Next Article in Journal
Surface Evolution of Nano-Textured 4H–SiC Homoepitaxial Layers after High Temperature Treatments: Morphology Characterization and Graphene Growth
Next Article in Special Issue
Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Graphene/Sulfur/Carbon Nanocomposite for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(3), 1493-1531; doi:10.3390/nano5031493

Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective

Nanobio Device Laboratory, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jiye Fang
Received: 5 August 2015 / Revised: 25 August 2015 / Accepted: 26 August 2015 / Published: 7 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [5541 KB, uploaded 7 September 2015]   |  

Abstract

Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to obtain current conductive textile technology, and the integration of electronic components into these textiles shows great promise for common everyday applications. The harvest and storage of energy in textile electronics is a challenge that requires further attention in order to enable complete adoption of this technology in practical implementations. This review focuses on the various conductive textiles, their methods of preparation, and textile-based electronic components. We also focus on fabrication and the function of textile-based energy harvesting and storage devices, discuss their fundamental limitations, and suggest new areas of study. View Full-Text
Keywords: wearable electronics; textile electronics; conductive fabric; textile sensors; energy harvesting and storage wearable electronics; textile electronics; conductive fabric; textile sensors; energy harvesting and storage
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kaushik, V.; Lee, J.; Hong, J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.; Seo, J.; Mahata, C.; Lee, T. Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective. Nanomaterials 2015, 5, 1493-1531.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nanomaterials EISSN 2079-4991 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top