Special Issue "Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Yogendra Kumar Mishra

Functional Nanomaterials, Institute for Materials Science, Kiel University, Kaiserstr. 2, D-24143, Kiel, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hybrid inorganic nanomaterials; semiconductors; oxides; nitrides; plamonics; sensing; biomaterials; photocatalysis; porous materials; 3D nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Aim:

Dear Colleagues,

In last couple of decades, nanomaterials have received a lot of research interest in terms of syntheses, characterizations, and individual applications. Of course nanomaterials in pure and hybrid forms have much more scopes towards nurturing our day-to-day life but this aspect has been less explored. In my opinion, the applied aspects of nanomaterials should get proper attention now and this special issue will focus on potentials of various nanomaterials towards developing the cutting-edge technologies for our society.  

History:

The term 'nanomaterial' was coined in ~1960 but if one carefully looks into the literature, these dimensionally confined materials were quite much in medical practice in ancient times (Indian-Ayurveda, Greeks, Middle East, etc.). The fundamental research about the nanomaterials has been revisited in last couple of decades (from the huge literature, I can say,) and this field has to see the potentials of nanomaterials towards day-to-day appliances in different new technologies. New and innovative synthesis strategies should be developed which offer not only fabrications but their easy and compact integration opportunities in various technologies. Experimental physics, materials, chemistry, biological, pharmaceutical, and other interdisciplinary research communities should joint together at one platform to understand the application potentials of nanomaterials, however, mathematics, fundamental physics, computational materials science community should help in developing and understanding unique physical and chemical properties of pure and hybrid nanomaterials in different forms.

Scope:

This special issue is dedicated towards understanding the structure-property relationships of advance stage pure and hybrid nanomaterials using innovative synthesis strategies (physics, chemistry, biology, etc.).  The discussed nanomaterials should exhibit application potentials in different interdisciplinary directions. Fundamental studies about such materials would also be in the scope. The nano-ethics related articles which are of social interest are also welcome. The covered topics also include: plasmonics, photonics, electronics, energy, electrochemistry, sensing, photocatalysis, water purification, packaging, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticancerous, 3D nanoengineering, porous materials, composites, carbons, hydrogels, advanced ceramics, and other relevant nanomaterials and applications. Application aspects of nanomaterials (pure and hybrid) are must the submitted articles to be considered in this issue.

PD Dr. habil. Yogendra Kumar Mishra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • hybrids
  • multifunctional
  • synthesis
  • green chemistry
  • nanosensing
  • biomaterials
  • softmaterials
  • flexible ceramics
  • composites
  • advanced applications
  • cutting-edge technologies
  • smart nanodevices.

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Fabrication and Characterization of Novel Electrothermal Self-Healing Microcapsules with Graphene/Polymer Hybrid Shells for Bitumenious Material
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060419
Received: 25 April 2018 / Revised: 30 May 2018 / Accepted: 2 June 2018 / Published: 9 June 2018
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Abstract
Self-healing bituminous material has been a hot research topic in self-healing materials, and this smart self-healing approach is a promising a revolution in pavement material technology. Bitumen has a self-healing naturality relating to temperature, healing time, and aging degree. To date, heat induction
[...] Read more.
Self-healing bituminous material has been a hot research topic in self-healing materials, and this smart self-healing approach is a promising a revolution in pavement material technology. Bitumen has a self-healing naturality relating to temperature, healing time, and aging degree. To date, heat induction and microencapsulation rejuvenator are two feasible approaches, which have been put into real applications. However, both methods have disadvantages limiting their practical results and efficiency. It will be an ideal method combining the advantages and avoiding the disadvantages of the above two methods at the same time. The aim of this work was to synthesize and characterize electrothermal self-healing microcapsules containing bituminous rejuvenator with graphene/organic nanohybrid structure shells. The microcapsules owned electric conductivity capability because of the advent of graphene, and realized the self-healing through the two approaches of heat induction and rejuvenation. The microcapsule shells were fabricated using a strength hexamethoxymethylmelamine (HMMM) resin and graphene by two-step hybrid polymerization. Experimental tests were carried out to character the morphology, integrity, and shell structure. It was found that the electric charge balance determined the graphene/HMMM microstructure. The graphene content in shells could not be greatly increased under an electrostatic balance in emulsion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results indicated that the graphene had deposited on shells. TGA/DTG tests implied that the thermal decomposition temperature of microcapsules with graphene had increased to about 350 °C. The thermal conductivity of microcapsules had been sharply increased to about 8.0 W/m2·K with 2.0 wt % graphene in shells. At the same time, electrical resistivity of microcapsules/bitumen samples had a decrease with more graphene in bitumen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Theoretical Study of Aluminum Hydroxide as a Hydrogen-Bonded Layered Material
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 375; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060375
Received: 4 May 2018 / Revised: 23 May 2018 / Accepted: 25 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
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Abstract
In many layer-structured materials, constituent layers are bound through van der Waals (vdW) interactions. However, hydrogen bonding is another type of weak interaction which can contribute to the formation of multi-layered materials. In this work, we investigate aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH) 3 ] having
[...] Read more.
In many layer-structured materials, constituent layers are bound through van der Waals (vdW) interactions. However, hydrogen bonding is another type of weak interaction which can contribute to the formation of multi-layered materials. In this work, we investigate aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH) 3 ] having hydrogen bonding as an interlayer binding mechanism. We study the crystal structures and electronic band structures of bulk, single-layer, and multi-layer Al(OH) 3 using density functional theory calculations. We find that hydrogen bonds across the constituent layers indeed give rise to interlayer binding stronger than vdW interactions, and a reduction of the band gap occurs for an isolated layer as compared to bulk Al(OH) 3 which is attributed to the emergence of surface states. We also consider the alkali-halide intercalation between layers and examine how the intercalated atoms affect the atomic and electronic structures of Al(OH) 3 . Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Electrochemically-Driven Insertion of Biological Nanodiscs into Solid State Membrane Pores as a Basis for “Pore-In-Pore” Membranes
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(4), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8040237
Received: 2 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 13 April 2018
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Abstract
Nanoporous membranes are of increasing interest for many applications, such as molecular filters, biosensors, nanofluidic logic and energy conversion devices. To meet high-quality standards, e.g., in molecular separation processes, membranes with well-defined pores in terms of pore diameter and chemical properties are required.
[...] Read more.
Nanoporous membranes are of increasing interest for many applications, such as molecular filters, biosensors, nanofluidic logic and energy conversion devices. To meet high-quality standards, e.g., in molecular separation processes, membranes with well-defined pores in terms of pore diameter and chemical properties are required. However, the preparation of membranes with narrow pore diameter distributions is still challenging. In the work presented here, we demonstrate a strategy, a “pore-in-pore” approach, where the conical pores of a solid state membrane produced by a multi-step top-down lithography procedure are used as a template to insert precisely-formed biomolecular nanodiscs with exactly defined inner and outer diameters. These nanodiscs, which are the building blocks of tobacco mosaic virus-deduced particles, consist of coat proteins, which self-assemble under defined experimental conditions with a stabilizing short RNA. We demonstrate that the insertion of the nanodiscs can be driven either by diffusion due to a concentration gradient or by applying an electric field along the cross-section of the solid state membrane. It is found that the electrophoresis-driven insertion is significantly more effective than the insertion via the concentration gradient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Few-Layer MoS2 Nanodomains Decorating TiO2 Nanoparticles: A Case Study for the Photodegradation of Carbamazepine
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(4), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8040207
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 24 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 29 March 2018
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Abstract
S-doped TiO2 and hybrid MoS2/TiO2 systems have been synthesized, via the sulfidation with H2S of the bare TiO2 and of MoOx supported on TiO2 systems, with the aim of enhancing the photocatalytic properties of
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S-doped TiO2 and hybrid MoS2/TiO2 systems have been synthesized, via the sulfidation with H2S of the bare TiO2 and of MoOx supported on TiO2 systems, with the aim of enhancing the photocatalytic properties of TiO2 for the degradation of carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant drug, whose residues and metabolites are usually inefficiently removed in wastewater treatment plants. The focus of this study is to find a relationship between the morphology/structure/surface properties and photoactivity. The full characterization of samples reveals the strong effects of the H2S action on the properties of TiO2, with the formation of defects at the surface, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), while also the optical properties are strongly affected by the sulfidation treatment, with changes in the electronic states of TiO2. Meanwhile, the formation of small and thin few-layer MoS2 domains, decorating the TiO2 surface, is evidenced by both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV-Vis/Raman spectroscopies, while Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra give insights into the nature of Ti and Mo surface sites. The most interesting findings of our research are the enhanced photoactivity of the MoS2/TiO2 hybrid photocatalyst toward the carbamazepine mineralization. Surprisingly, the formation of hazardous compounds (i.e., acridine derivatives), usually obtained from carbamazepine, is precluded when treated with MoS2/TiO2 systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Nanotransition Materials (NTMs): Photocatalysis, Validated High Effective Sorbent Models Study for Organic Dye Degradation and Precise Mathematical Data’s at Standardized Level
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(3), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8030134
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 21 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
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Abstract
The present work describes the synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) via a solution process with the aim of applying the nano-adsorbent for the reduction of methylene blue (MB) dye in alkaline media. These NPs were characterized via Field emission scanning electron microscopy
[...] Read more.
The present work describes the synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) via a solution process with the aim of applying the nano-adsorbent for the reduction of methylene blue (MB) dye in alkaline media. These NPs were characterized via Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction, high-resolution Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultra violet UV-visible spectroscopy to confirm their morphology and crystalline and optical properties in order to design an adsorption-degradation process. The photocatalytic CuONPs exhibited dynamic properties, great adsorption affinity during the chemisorption process, and operated at various modes with a strong interaction between the adsorbent and the adsorptive species, and equilibrium isotherm, kinetic isotherm, and thermodynamic activities in the presence of UV light. All basic quantities, such as concentration, pH, adsorbent dose, time, and temperature, were determined by an optimization process. The best-fitted adsorption Langmuir model (R2 = 0.9988) and performance, including adsorption capacity (350.87 mg/g), photocatalytic efficiency (90.74%), and degradation rate constant (Ks = 2.23 ×10−2 min−1), illustrate good feasibility with respect to sorption-reduction reactions but followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic on the adsorbent surface, reaching an equilibrium point in 80 min. The thermodynamic analysis suggests that the adsorption reaction is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (∆H°), entropy (∆S°), and Gibbs free energy (∆G°) give effective results to support a chemical reduction reaction at 303 K temperature. The equilibrium isotherm and kinetic and thermodynamic models with error function analysis explore the potential, acceptability, accuracy, access to adsorbents, and novelty of an unrivaled-sorption system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessCommunication Large Area Nanoparticle Alignment by Chemical Lift-Off Lithography
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8020071
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nanoparticle alignment on the substrate attracts considerable attention due to its wide application in different fields, such as mechanical control, small size electronics, bio/chemical sensing, molecular manipulation, and energy harvesting. However, precise nanoparticle positioning and deposition control with high fidelity are still challenging.
[...] Read more.
Nanoparticle alignment on the substrate attracts considerable attention due to its wide application in different fields, such as mechanical control, small size electronics, bio/chemical sensing, molecular manipulation, and energy harvesting. However, precise nanoparticle positioning and deposition control with high fidelity are still challenging. Herein, a straightforward strategy for high quality nanoparticle-alignment by chemical lift-off lithography (CLL) is demonstrated. This technique creates high resolution self-assembled monolayer (SAM) chemical patterns on gold substrates, enabling nanoparticle-selective deposition and precise alignment. The fabricated nanoparticle arrangement geometries and dimensions are well-controllable in a large area. With proper nanoparticle surface functionality control and adequate substrate molecular manipulation, well-defined nanoparticle arrays with single-particle-wide alignment resolution are achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Structure and Optical Properties of Titania-PDMS Hybrid Nanocomposites Prepared by In Situ Non-Aqueous Synthesis
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(12), 460; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7120460
Received: 23 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 20 December 2017
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Abstract
Organic-inorganic hybrid materials are attractive due to the combination of properties from the two distinct types of materials. In this work, transparent titania-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid materials with up to 15.5 vol. % TiO2 content were prepared by an in situ non-aqueous method using
[...] Read more.
Organic-inorganic hybrid materials are attractive due to the combination of properties from the two distinct types of materials. In this work, transparent titania-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid materials with up to 15.5 vol. % TiO2 content were prepared by an in situ non-aqueous method using titanium (IV) isopropoxide and hydroxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane as precursors. Spectroscopy (Fourier transform infrared, Raman, Ultraviolet-visible, ellipsometry) and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis allowed to describe in detail the structure and the optical properties of the nanocomposites. Titanium alkoxide was successfully used as a cross-linker and titania-like nanodomains with an average size of approximately 4 nm were shown to form during the process. The resulting hybrid nanocomposites exhibit high transparency and tunable refractive index from 1.42 up to 1.56, depending on the titania content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Ionic Liquid Confined in Mesoporous Polymer Membrane with Improved Stability for CO2/N2 Separation
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7100299
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 20 September 2017 / Accepted: 25 September 2017 / Published: 29 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) have a promising prospect of application in flue gas separation, owing to its high permeability and selectivity of CO2. However, existing SILMs have the disadvantage of poor stability due to the loss of ionic liquid from
[...] Read more.
Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) have a promising prospect of application in flue gas separation, owing to its high permeability and selectivity of CO2. However, existing SILMs have the disadvantage of poor stability due to the loss of ionic liquid from the large pores of the macroporous support. In this study, a novel SILM with high stability was developed by confining ionic liquid in a mesoporous polymer membrane. First, a mesoporous polymer membrane derived from a soluble, low-molecular-weight phenolic resin precursor was deposited on a porous Al2O3 support, and then 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([emim][BF4]) was immobilized inside mesopores of phenolic resin, forming the SILM under vacuum. Effects of trans-membrane pressure difference on the SILM separation performance were investigated by measuring the permeances of CO2 and N2. The SILM exhibits a high ideal CO2/N2 selectivity of 40, and an actual selectivity of approximately 25 in a mixed gas (50% CO2 and 50% N2) at a trans-membrane pressure difference of 2.5 bar. Compared to [emim][BF4] supported by polyethersulfone membrane with a pore size of around 0.45 μm, the [emim][BF4] confined in a mesoporous polymer membrane exhibits an improved stability, and its separation performance remained stable for 40 h under a trans-membrane pressure difference of 1.5 bar in a mixed gas before the measurement was intentionally stopped. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Nanoparticle-Mediated Therapeutic Agent Delivery for Treating Metastatic Breast Cancer—Challenges and Opportunities
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(6), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8060361
Received: 8 May 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
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Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American women and more than 90% of BC-related death is caused by metastatic BC (MBC). This review stresses the limited success of traditional therapies as well as the use of nanomedicine
[...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American women and more than 90% of BC-related death is caused by metastatic BC (MBC). This review stresses the limited success of traditional therapies as well as the use of nanomedicine for treating MBC. Understanding the biological barriers of MBC that nanoparticle in vivo trafficking must overcome could provide valuable new insights for translating nanomedicine from the bench side to the bedside. A view about nanomedicine applied in BC therapy has been summarized with their present status, which is gaining attention in the clinically-applied landscape. The progressions of drug/gene delivery systems, especially the status of their preclinical or clinical trials, are also discussed. Here we highlight that the treatment of metastasis, in addition to the extensively described inhibition of primary tumor growth, is an indispensable requirement for nanomedicine. Along with more innovations in material chemistry and more progressions in biology, nanomedicine will constantly supply more exciting new approaches for targeted drug/gene delivery against MBC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hybrid Nanomaterials for Future Technologies)
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