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Special Issue "Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging and Mapping"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christian Huck

Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, CCB-Center for Chemistry and Biomedicine, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80-82, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +4351250757304
Interests: vibrational spectroscopy; separation science; enrichment techniques; mass spectrometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of vibrational spectroscopic imaging and mapping applied to different disciplines in life sciences, including, for example, cancer diagnosis and therapy, plant tissue studies, etc., has given rise to many highly interesting papers. In most cases, these papers are spread over several different journals with individual scientific focuses. Consequently, it is important to create a Special Issue to provide a broad survey and address various aspects. For the readership, this Special Issue will provide an attractive opportunity to obtain, more easily, information concerning the different facets of both infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging and mapping. For the authors, it will be an appropriate occasion to make their results and techniques more visible, and to show that they are active members in the field of vibrational spectroscopic imaging and mapping.

This Special Issue will contain contributions discussing all the different aspects broadly indicated by the keywords. Review articles by experts in the field will also be welcome.

Prof. Dr. Christian Huck
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vibrational spectroscopy
  • Imaging
  • Mapping
  • Near infrared
  • Mid infrared
  • Raman
  • Chemometrics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Phase and Index of Refraction Imaging by Hyperspectral Reflectance Confocal Microscopy
Molecules 2016, 21(12), 1727; doi:10.3390/molecules21121727
Received: 6 October 2016 / Revised: 7 December 2016 / Accepted: 9 December 2016 / Published: 16 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4330 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscope (HSCM) was realized by CNR-ISC (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi) a few years ago. The instrument and data have been already presented and discussed. The main activity of this HSCM has been within biology, and reflectance
[...] Read more.
A hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscope (HSCM) was realized by CNR-ISC (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi) a few years ago. The instrument and data have been already presented and discussed. The main activity of this HSCM has been within biology, and reflectance data have shown good matching between spectral signatures and the nature or evolution on many types of cells. Such a relationship has been demonstrated mainly with statistical tools like Principal Component Analysis (PCA), or similar concepts, which represent a very common approach for hyperspectral imaging. However, the point is that reflectance data contains much more useful information and, moreover, there is an obvious interest to go from reflectance, bound to the single experiment, to reflectivity, or other physical quantities, related to the sample alone. To accomplish this aim, we can follow well-established analyses and methods used in reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, we show methods of calculations for index of refraction n, extinction coefficient k and local thicknesses of frequency starting from phase images by fast Kramers-Kronig (KK) algorithms and the Abeles matrix formalism. Details, limitations and problems of the presented calculations as well as alternative procedures are given for an example of HSCM images of red blood cells (RBC). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging and Mapping)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle In Vivo Monitoring of the Growth of Fertilized Eggs of Medaka Fish (Oryzias latipes) by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Imaging—A Marked Change in the Relative Content of Weakly Hydrogen-Bonded Water in Egg Yolk Just before Hatching
Molecules 2016, 21(8), 1003; doi:10.3390/molecules21081003
Received: 14 May 2016 / Revised: 21 July 2016 / Accepted: 27 July 2016 / Published: 1 August 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (16980 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study develops further our previous study of in vivo monitoring at the molecular level of the embryonic development in Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and NIR imaging. NIR spectra were measured nondestructively for three major
[...] Read more.
The present study develops further our previous study of in vivo monitoring at the molecular level of the embryonic development in Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and NIR imaging. NIR spectra were measured nondestructively for three major parts of fertilized medaka eggs (the embryonic body, oil droplets, and egg yolk) from the first day after fertilization to the day just before hatching (JBH). Changes in the contents of chemical components such as proteins, water, and lipids were monitored in situ during embryonic development. A marked change in the relative content of weakly hydrogen-bonded water was observed in the egg yolk JBH. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out using the NIR spectra data of the egg yolk and embryo on the fifth day after fertilization. The PCA clearly separates the egg yolk data from the embryo body parts. Principal component PC1 and PC2 loading plots suggest that the hydrogen bonding structure of water in the egg yolk is considerably different to those of the other parts and the fraction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water in the egg yolk is smaller than that in the embryonic body. NIR images developed from the intensities of peaks of second derivative spectra owing to water and proteins show their different distribution patterns. Images of the ratio of strongly and weakly hydrogen-bonded water confirmed that oil droplets and embryonic body parts have higher and lower ratios, respectively, of strongly hydrogen-bonded water than do the other parts. The images developed from the intensity of the peaks at 4864 and 4616 cm−1 related to the proteins indicated that the egg yolk contains a higher concentration of protein than do the other parts. The peaks at 5756 and 4530 cm−1 caused by the protein secondary structures of α-helix and β-sheet showed the configuration of the egg cell membrane. The present study might lead to new understanding at the molecular level regarding the growth of fertilized eggs and provides a new tool to visualize egg development in a nondestructive manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging and Mapping)
Figures

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Multivariate Chemical Image Fusion of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging Modalities
Molecules 2016, 21(7), 870; doi:10.3390/molecules21070870
Received: 13 April 2016 / Revised: 14 June 2016 / Accepted: 28 June 2016 / Published: 2 July 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (6153 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge
[...] Read more.
Chemical image fusion refers to the combination of chemical images from different modalities for improved characterisation of a sample. Challenges associated with existing approaches include: difficulties with imaging the same sample area or having identical pixels across microscopic modalities, lack of prior knowledge of sample composition and lack of knowledge regarding correlation between modalities for a given sample. In addition, the multivariate structure of chemical images is often overlooked when fusion is carried out. We address these challenges by proposing a framework for multivariate chemical image fusion of vibrational spectroscopic imaging modalities, demonstrating the approach for image registration, fusion and resolution enhancement of chemical images obtained with IR and Raman microscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging and Mapping)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Applications and Developments on the Use of Vibrational Spectroscopy Imaging for the Analysis, Monitoring and Characterisation of Crops and Plants
Molecules 2016, 21(6), 755; doi:10.3390/molecules21060755
Received: 10 April 2016 / Revised: 30 May 2016 / Accepted: 7 June 2016 / Published: 10 June 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The adaptation and use of advanced technologies is an effective and encouraging way to efficiently and reliably characterise crops and plants. Additionally advances in these technologies will improve the information available for agronomists, breeders and plant physiologists in order to develop best management
[...] Read more.
The adaptation and use of advanced technologies is an effective and encouraging way to efficiently and reliably characterise crops and plants. Additionally advances in these technologies will improve the information available for agronomists, breeders and plant physiologists in order to develop best management practices in the process and commercialization of agricultural products and commodities. Methods based on vibrational spectroscopy such as near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy using either single spot or hyperspectral measurements are now more available and ready to use than ever before. The main characteristics of these methodologies (high-throughput, non-destructive) have determined a growth in basic and applied research using NIR spectroscopy in many disciplines related with crop and plant sciences. A wide range of studies have demonstrated the ability of NIR spectroscopy to analyse different parameters in crops. Recently the use of hyperspectral imaging techniques have expanded the range of applications in crop and plant sciences. This article provides an overview of applications and developments of NIR hyperspectral image for the analysis, monitoring and characterisation of crops and plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging and Mapping)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Applications and developments on the use of vibrational spectroscopy imaging for the analysis, monitoring and characterisation of crops and plants
Author: Cozzolino, D.
Affiliation: School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland Innovation and Research Precint (CQIRP), Central Queensland University (CQU) Australia, Bruce Highway, North Rockhampton Qld 4701.
Email:
Abstract: Adapting and using advanced technologies is a promising way to efficiently and reliably characterise and improve crops, as well as to improve the information available to be used by agronomists in order to develop best management practices in the process and commercialization of agricultural products and commodities. The main characteristic of these methodologies (high-throughput, non-destructive) attracted researchers from different fields in plant sciences (e.g., physiology, breeding) where many applications were or are in development. Different studies have shown the important role of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in the analysis of crops and more recently, the development of hyper spectral imaging is placing these techniques and methods as the most useful tools in crop and plant sciences. These article provide with an overview on the applications and developments of vibrational spectroscopy imaging for the analysis, monitoring and characterization of crops and plants.

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