E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Catalytic Materials"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Davide Ferri

Paul Scherrer Institute, OLGA/411, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +41 56 310 2781
Fax: +41 56 310 2323
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; environmental catalysis; operando spectroscopy; IR spectroscopy; perovskite-type oxides; functional materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Catalysts, heterogeneous or homogeneous, play a central role in present industrial production and will remain crucial for the development of novel processes based on the use of renewable feedstocks and of novel process technologies (e.g. photocatalysis). This issue wants to focus on various aspects of catalytic materials, from their synthesis to the structural characterization including the structure under reactive conditions, from the final application to the development of theoretical models to describe them.
Therefore, manuscripts covering these topics will be suitable for publication in the special issue dedicated to advanced catalytic materials.

Dr. Davide Ferri
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (10 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-10
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Amino Alcohol Oxidation with Gold Catalysts: The Effect of Amino Groups
Materials 2013, 6(7), 2777-2788; doi:10.3390/ma6072777
Received: 28 February 2013 / Revised: 22 May 2013 / Accepted: 14 June 2013 / Published: 12 July 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (752 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gold catalysts have been prepared by sol immobilization using Tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) as a protective and reducing agent or by deposition on different supports (Al2O3, TiO2, MgAl2O4, and MgO). The catalytic systems
[...] Read more.
Gold catalysts have been prepared by sol immobilization using Tetrakis(hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) as a protective and reducing agent or by deposition on different supports (Al2O3, TiO2, MgAl2O4, and MgO). The catalytic systems have been tested in the liquid phase oxidation of aminoalcohols (serinol and ethanolamine) and the corresponding polyols (glycerol and ethylene glycol). This comparison allowed us to state that the presence of amino groups has a crucial effect on the catalytic performance, in particular decreasing the durability to the catalysts, but did not substantially vary the selectivity. A support effect has been as well established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Effect of Ni Core Structure on the Electrocatalytic Activity of Pt-Ni/C in Methanol Oxidation
Materials 2013, 6(7), 2689-2700; doi:10.3390/ma6072689
Received: 16 February 2013 / Revised: 7 April 2013 / Accepted: 16 April 2013 / Published: 8 July 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1056 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Methanol oxidation catalysts comprising an outer Pt-shell with an inner Ni-core supported on carbon, (Pt-Ni/C), were prepared with either crystalline or amorphous Ni core structures. Structural comparisons of the two forms of catalyst were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD)
[...] Read more.
Methanol oxidation catalysts comprising an outer Pt-shell with an inner Ni-core supported on carbon, (Pt-Ni/C), were prepared with either crystalline or amorphous Ni core structures. Structural comparisons of the two forms of catalyst were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and methanol oxidation activity compared using CV and chronoamperometry (CA). While both the amorphous Ni core and crystalline Ni core structures were covered by similar Pt shell thickness and structure, the Pt-Ni(amorphous)/C catalyst had higher methanol oxidation activity. The amorphous Ni core thus offers improved Pt usage efficiency in direct methanol fuel cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Open AccessArticle Cobalt-based Catalysts for Ammonia Decomposition
Materials 2013, 6(6), 2400-2409; doi:10.3390/ma6062400
Received: 11 March 2013 / Revised: 20 May 2013 / Accepted: 5 June 2013 / Published: 10 June 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (551 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An effect of promoters such as calcium, aluminium, and potassium oxides and also addition of chromium and manganese on the structure of cobalt catalysts was examined. Studies of the catalytic ammonia decomposition over the cobalt catalysts are presented. The studies of the ammonia
[...] Read more.
An effect of promoters such as calcium, aluminium, and potassium oxides and also addition of chromium and manganese on the structure of cobalt catalysts was examined. Studies of the catalytic ammonia decomposition over the cobalt catalysts are presented. The studies of the ammonia decomposition were carried out for various ammonia-hydrogen mixtures in which ammonia concentration varied in the range from 10% to 100%. Co(0) catalyst, promoted by oxides of aluminium, calcium, and potassium, showed the highest activity in the ammonia decomposition reaction. Contrary to expectations, it was found that chromium and manganese addition into the catalysts decreased their activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle The Effect of PtRuIr Nanoparticle Crystallinity in Electrocatalytic Methanol Oxidation
Materials 2013, 6(5), 1621-1631; doi:10.3390/ma6051621
Received: 18 February 2013 / Revised: 23 April 2013 / Accepted: 24 April 2013 / Published: 29 April 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (886 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two structural forms of a ternary alloy PtRuIr/C catalyst, one amorphous and one highly crystalline, were synthesized and compared to determine the effect of their respective structures on their activity and stability as anodic catalysts in methanol oxidation. Characterization techniques included TEM, XRD,
[...] Read more.
Two structural forms of a ternary alloy PtRuIr/C catalyst, one amorphous and one highly crystalline, were synthesized and compared to determine the effect of their respective structures on their activity and stability as anodic catalysts in methanol oxidation. Characterization techniques included TEM, XRD, and EDX. Electrochemical analysis using a glassy carbon disk electrode for cyclic voltammogram and chronoamperometry were tested in a solution of 0.5 mol L−1 CH3OH and 0.5 mol L−1 H2SO4. Amorphous PtRuIr/C catalyst was found to have a larger electrochemical surface area, while the crystalline PtRuIr/C catalyst had both a higher activity in methanol oxidation and increased CO poisoning rate. Crystallinity of the active alloy nanoparticles has a big impact on both methanol oxidation activity and in the CO poisoning rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Open AccessArticle Butanol Dehydration over V2O5-TiO2/MCM-41 Catalysts Prepared via Liquid Phase Atomic Layer Deposition
Materials 2013, 6(5), 1718-1729; doi:10.3390/ma6051718
Received: 5 March 2013 / Revised: 10 April 2013 / Accepted: 24 April 2013 / Published: 29 April 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
MCM-41 was used as a support and, by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the liquid phase, a catalyst was prepared by consecutively loading titanium oxide and vanadium oxide to the support. This research analyzes the effect of the loading amount of vanadium
[...] Read more.
MCM-41 was used as a support and, by using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the liquid phase, a catalyst was prepared by consecutively loading titanium oxide and vanadium oxide to the support. This research analyzes the effect of the loading amount of vanadium oxide on the acidic characteristics and catalytic performance in the dehydration of butanol. The physical and chemical characteristics of the TiO2-V2O5/MCM-41 catalysts were analyzed using XRF, BET, NH3-TPD, XRD, Py-IR, and XPS. The dehydration reaction of butanol was performed in a fixed bed reactor. For the samples with vanadium oxide loaded to TiO2/MCM-41 sample using the liquid phase ALD method, it was possible to increase the loading amount until the amount of vanadium oxide reached 12.1 wt %. It was confirmed that the structural properties of the mesoporous silica were retained well after titanium oxide and vanadium loading. The NH3-TPD and Py-IR results indicated that weak acid sites were produced over the TiO2/MCM-41 samples, which is attributed to the generation of Lewis acid sites. The highest activity of the V2O5(12.1)-TiO2/MCM-41 catalyst in 2-butanol dehydration is ascribed to it having the highest number of Lewis acid sites, as well as the highest vanadium dispersion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Degradation of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid (2,4-D) by Novel Photocatalytic Material of Tourmaline-Coated TiO2 Nanoparticles: Kinetic Study and Model
Materials 2013, 6(4), 1530-1542; doi:10.3390/ma6041530
Received: 19 February 2013 / Revised: 28 March 2013 / Accepted: 7 April 2013 / Published: 15 April 2013
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The novel complex photocatalytic material was prepared by coating TiO2 nanoparticles on tourmaline using the sol-gel method, and used in the degradation of the herbicide 2,4-D. The results indicated that coating TiO2 with tourmaline enhanced the photocatalytic activity significantly. Based on
[...] Read more.
The novel complex photocatalytic material was prepared by coating TiO2 nanoparticles on tourmaline using the sol-gel method, and used in the degradation of the herbicide 2,4-D. The results indicated that coating TiO2 with tourmaline enhanced the photocatalytic activity significantly. Based on the research of a simplified model for the average light intensity in the photoreactor, the influence of the concentration of photocatalyst, and the initial concentration of 2,4-D, a model for the degradation of 2,4-D by the tourmaline-coated TiO2 nanoparticles was established. Further tests showed that results calculated from this model were close to those obtained in the actual experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Open AccessArticle Photocatalytic Oxidation of Low-Level Airborne 2-Propanol and Trichloroethylene over Titania Irradiated with Bulb-Type Light-Emitting Diodes
Materials 2013, 6(1), 265-278; doi:10.3390/ma6010265
Received: 23 October 2012 / Revised: 26 December 2012 / Accepted: 15 January 2013 / Published: 18 January 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study examined the photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE) and 2-propanol, at indoor levels, over titanium dioxide (TiO2) irradiated with light-emitting diodes (LED) under different operational conditions. TiO2 powder baked at 450 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic decomposition efficiency
[...] Read more.
This study examined the photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE) and 2-propanol, at indoor levels, over titanium dioxide (TiO2) irradiated with light-emitting diodes (LED) under different operational conditions. TiO2 powder baked at 450 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic decomposition efficiency (PDE) for TCE, while all photocatalysts baked at different temperatures showed similar PDEs for 2-propanol. The average PDEs of TCE over a three hour period were four, four, five, and 51% for TiO2 powders baked at 150, 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The average PDEs of 2-propanol were 95, 97, 98, and 96% for TiO2 powders baked at 150, 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The ratio of anatase at 2θ = 25.2° to rutile at 2θ = 27.4° was lowest for the TiO2 powder baked at 450 °C. Although the LED-irradiated TiO2 system revealed lower PDEs of TCE and 2-propanol when compared to those of the eight watt, black-light lamp-irradiated TiO2 system, the results for the PDEs normalized to the energy consumption were reversed. Other operational parameters, such as relative humidity, input concentrations, flow rate, and feeding type were also found to influence the photocatalytic performance of the UV LED-irradiated TiO2 system when applied to the cleaning of TCE and 2-propanol at indoor air levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Self-Ordered Titanium Dioxide Nanotube Arrays: Anodic Synthesis and Their Photo/Electro-Catalytic Applications
Materials 2013, 6(7), 2892-2957; doi:10.3390/ma6072892
Received: 1 March 2013 / Revised: 2 May 2013 / Accepted: 5 June 2013 / Published: 16 July 2013
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (1873 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metal oxide nanotubes have become a widely investigated material, more specifically, self-organized titania nanotube arrays synthesized by electrochemical anodization. As a highly investigated material with a wide gamut of applications, the majority of published literature focuses on the solar-based applications of this material.
[...] Read more.
Metal oxide nanotubes have become a widely investigated material, more specifically, self-organized titania nanotube arrays synthesized by electrochemical anodization. As a highly investigated material with a wide gamut of applications, the majority of published literature focuses on the solar-based applications of this material. The scope of this review summarizes some of the recent advances made using metal oxide nanotube arrays formed via anodization in solar-based applications. A general methodology for theoretical modeling of titania surfaces in solar applications is also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)
Open AccessReview Ethylene Formation by Catalytic Dehydration of Ethanol with Industrial Considerations
Materials 2013, 6(1), 101-115; doi:10.3390/ma6010101
Received: 9 November 2012 / Revised: 20 December 2012 / Accepted: 21 December 2012 / Published: 28 December 2012
Cited by 28 | PDF Full-text (230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Ethylene is the primary component in most plastics, making it economically valuable. It is produced primarily by steam-cracking of hydrocarbons, but can alternatively be produced by the dehydration of ethanol, which can be produced from fermentation processes using renewable substrates such as glucose,
[...] Read more.
Ethylene is the primary component in most plastics, making it economically valuable. It is produced primarily by steam-cracking of hydrocarbons, but can alternatively be produced by the dehydration of ethanol, which can be produced from fermentation processes using renewable substrates such as glucose, starch and others. Due to rising oil prices, researchers now look at alternative reactions to produce green ethylene, but the process is far from being as economically competitive as using fossil fuels. Many studies have investigated catalysts and new reaction engineering technologies to increase ethylene yield and to lower reaction temperature, in an effort to make the reaction applicable in industry and most cost-efficient. This paper presents various lab synthesized catalysts, reaction conditions, and reactor technologies that achieved high ethylene yield at reasonable reaction temperatures, and evaluates their practicality in industrial application in comparison with steam-cracking plants. The most promising were found to be a nanoscale catalyst HZSM-5 with 99.7% ethylene selectivity at 240 °C and 630 h lifespan, using a microreactor technology with mechanical vapor recompression, and algae-produced ethanol to make ethylene. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessConcept Paper A Perspective on the Flame Spray Synthesis of Photocatalyst Nanoparticles
Materials 2013, 6(8), 3194-3212; doi:10.3390/ma6083194
Received: 3 June 2013 / Revised: 6 July 2013 / Accepted: 8 July 2013 / Published: 31 July 2013
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (839 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The synthesis of functional nanoparticles via one-step flame spray pyrolysis (FSP), especially those of catalytic nature, has attracted the interests of scientists and engineers, as well as industries. The rapid and high temperature continuous synthesis yields nanoparticles with intrinsic features of active catalysts,
[...] Read more.
The synthesis of functional nanoparticles via one-step flame spray pyrolysis (FSP), especially those of catalytic nature, has attracted the interests of scientists and engineers, as well as industries. The rapid and high temperature continuous synthesis yields nanoparticles with intrinsic features of active catalysts, that is, high surface area and surface energetics. For these reasons, FSP finds applications in various thermally inducible catalytic reactions. However, the design and synthesis of photocatalysts by FSP requires a knowledge set which is different from that established for thermal catalysts. Unknown to many, this has resulted in frustrations to those entering the field unprepared, especially since FSP appears to be an elegant tool in synthesising oxide nanoparticles of any elemental construct. From simple oxide to doped-oxide, and mixed metal oxide to the in situ deposition of noble metals, this Perspective gives an overview on the development of photocatalysts made by FSP in the last decade that led to a better understanding of the design criteria. Various challenges and opportunities are also highlighted, especially those beyond simple metal oxides, which perhaps contain the greatest potential for the exploitation of photocatalysts design by FSP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Catalytic Materials)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
materials@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials
Back to Top