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Special Issue "Physical Anti-Bacterial Nanostructured Biomaterials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Elena Ivanova

Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 61392145137
Interests: planar micro-devices; bio-molecules; micro-organisms; bacterial taxonomy; bacterial interactions; macro/micro/nanostructured surfaces; surface chemistry
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Russell Crawford

Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: colloid and surface science; biointerfaces; biofilms; biological; anti-bacterial; implants; surface nano-topography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial surfaces are receiving a significant amount of interest, particularly over the last five years. Surfaces, such as those are being developed, are one method to stem the increasing prevalence of microbial contamination of medical and industrial surfaces. In recent years, certain nanostructured surfaces have been shown to exhibit high levels of biocidal action, with this behaviour arising from physical, rather than chemical, action. Such surfaces include those containing particular nanotopologies, including those that are found on some insect wing surfaces, such as those of cicadae, damselflies and dragonflies. The activity of these surfaces has been shown to arise from interactions of a physical nature, where the nanostructures on the substrates disrupt the cell wall structure of the attaching pathogenic cells. 

This Special Issue of Materials will report on recent advances being made in the identification and development of the nanostructured biomaterials that exhibit anti-bacterial behaviour, where the origin of this action arises from physical interactions at the cell–substrate interface.

Prof. Dr. Elena  Ivanova
Prof. Dr. Russell Crawford
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial Surfaces
  • Nanostructured Biomaterials
  • Nanotopology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cell Response on Mechanobactericidal Titanium Surfaces
Materials 2018, 11(4), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040605
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 31 March 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 14 April 2018
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Abstract
Titanium is a biocompatible material that is frequently used for making implantable medical devices. Nanoengineering of the surface is the common method for increasing material biocompatibility, and while the nanostructured materials are well-known to represent attractive substrata for eukaryotic cells, very little information
[...] Read more.
Titanium is a biocompatible material that is frequently used for making implantable medical devices. Nanoengineering of the surface is the common method for increasing material biocompatibility, and while the nanostructured materials are well-known to represent attractive substrata for eukaryotic cells, very little information has been documented about the interaction between mammalian cells and bactericidal nanostructured surfaces. In this study, we investigated the effect of bactericidal titanium nanostructures on PC12 cell attachment and differentiation—a cell line which has become a widely used in vitro model to study neuronal differentiation. The effects of the nanostructures on the cells were then compared to effects observed when the cells were placed in contact with non-structured titanium. It was found that bactericidal nanostructured surfaces enhanced the attachment of neuron-like cells. In addition, the PC12 cells were able to differentiate on nanostructured surfaces, while the cells on non-structured surfaces were not able to do so. These promising results demonstrate the potential application of bactericidal nanostructured surfaces in biomedical applications such as cochlear and neuronal implants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Anti-Bacterial Nanostructured Biomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle Arrest of Root Carious Lesions via Sodium Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Silver Diamine Fluoride In Vitro
Materials 2018, 11(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11010009
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 22 December 2017
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Abstract
Objective: To compare the root carious lesion arrest of chlorhexidine (CHX) and silver diamine fluoride (SDF) varnishes and/or sodium fluoride rinses (NaF) in vitro. Background: Effective and easily applicable interventions for treating root carious lesions are needed, as these lesions are highly prevalent
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Objective: To compare the root carious lesion arrest of chlorhexidine (CHX) and silver diamine fluoride (SDF) varnishes and/or sodium fluoride rinses (NaF) in vitro. Background: Effective and easily applicable interventions for treating root carious lesions are needed, as these lesions are highly prevalent amongst elderly individuals. Methods: In 100 bovine dentin samples, artificial root carious lesions were induced using acetic acid and a continuous-culture Lactobacillus rhamnosus biofilm model. One quarter of each induced lesion was excavated and baseline dentinal bacterial counts assessed as Colony-Forming-Units (CFU) per mg. Samples were allocated to one of four treatments (n = 25/group): (1) untreated control; (2) 38% SDF or (3) 35% CHX varnish, each applied once, plus 500 ppm daily NaF rinse in the subsequent lesion progression phase; and (4) daily NaF rinses only. Samples were re-transferred to the biofilm model and submitted to a cariogenic challenge. After six days, another quarter of each lesion was used to assess bacterial counts and the remaining sample was used to assess integrated mineral loss (ΔZ) using microradiography. Results: ΔZ did not differ significantly between control (median (25th/75th percentiles): 9082 (7859/9782) vol % × µm), NaF (6704 (4507/9574) and SDF 7206 (5389/8082)) (p < 0.05/Kruskal–Wallis test). CHX significantly reduced ΔZ (3385 (2447/4496)) compared with all other groups (p < 0.05). Bacterial numbers did not differ significantly between control (1451 (875/2644) CFU/µg) and NaF (750 (260/1401)) (p > 0.05). SDF reduced bacterial counts (360 (136/1166)) significantly compared with control (p < 0.05). CHX reduced bacterial counts (190 (73/517)) significantly compared with NaF and control (p < 0.05). Conclusion: CHX varnish plus regular NaF rinses arrested root carious lesions most successfully. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Anti-Bacterial Nanostructured Biomaterials)
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