Special Issue "Advances in the Tribology of Artificial Hip and Knee Joints"

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A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rajshree Mootanah (Website)

1 Department of Engineering and Built Environment, Faculty of Science & Technology Anglia Ruskin University Bishop Hall Lane Chelmsford, Essex CM1 1SQ, UK
2 Visiting Scientist, Leon Root Motion Analysis Laboratory Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA
3 Visiting Professor, University of Mascara, Algeria
Fax: (44) 1245 684536

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Artificial hip and knee joints have been successful in restoring joint function and mobility. However, wear of articular bearing surfaces and osteolysis continue to be major factors that limit implant longevity. Wear debris, generated in artificial hip and knees, are largely confined to the bone and joint interface. Phagocytosis of wear debris is size-dependent. Wear particle size, shape, and volume are influenced by joint type, bearing geometry, material combination, and lubricant-type. The released, unwanted metallic debris interact with periprosthetic surrounding tissues and may cause pain, hypersensitivity, inflammation, pseudotumour formation, implant loosening, and the need for revision surgery. Further research is warranted to improve the articular bearing surfaces of artificial hip and knee joints.

Dr. Rajshree Mootanah
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Bio-Environment-Induced Degradation and Failure of Internal Fixation Implants
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(4), 1012-1020; doi:10.3390/jfb6041012
Received: 21 July 2015 / Revised: 29 August 2015 / Accepted: 10 October 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
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Abstract
Internal fixations provide fast healing but their failure remains problematic to patients. Here, we report an experimental study in failure of three typical cases of metals: a bent intramedullary stainless steel nail, a broken exterior pure Ti plate, and a broken intramedullary [...] Read more.
Internal fixations provide fast healing but their failure remains problematic to patients. Here, we report an experimental study in failure of three typical cases of metals: a bent intramedullary stainless steel nail, a broken exterior pure Ti plate, and a broken intramedullary stainless steel nail. Characterization of the bent nail indicates that those metals are vulnerable to corrosion with the evidence of increased surface roughness and embrittlement. Depredated surface of the Ti plate resulted debris particles in the surrounding tissue of 15.2 ± 6.5 μm in size. Nanoparticles were observed in transmission electron microscope. The electron diffraction pattern of the debris indicates a combination of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases. The failure mode of the broken nail made of stainless steel was found to be fatigue initiated from the surface. This study clearly shows the biological-attack induced surface degradation resulting in debris and fatigue. Future design and selection of implant materials should consider such factors for improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Tribology of Artificial Hip and Knee Joints)
Open AccessArticle The Tribology of Explanted Hip Resurfacings Following Early Fracture of the Femur
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(4), 1021-1035; doi:10.3390/jfb6041021
Received: 2 September 2015 / Revised: 3 October 2015 / Accepted: 10 October 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
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Abstract
A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this [...] Read more.
A recognized issue related to metal-on-metal hip resurfacings is early fracture of the femur. Most theories regarding the cause of fracture relate to clinical factors but an engineering analysis of failed hip resurfacings has not previously been reported. The objective of this work was to determine the wear volumes and surface roughness values of a cohort of retrieved hip resurfacings which were removed due to early femoral fracture, infection and avascular necrosis (AVN). Nine resurfacing femoral heads were obtained following early fracture of the femur, a further five were retrieved due to infection and AVN. All fourteen were measured for volumetric wear using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Wear rates were then calculated and regions of the articulating surface were divided into “worn” and “unworn”. Roughness values in these regions were measured using a non-contacting profilometer. The mean time to fracture was 3.7 months compared with 44.4 months for retrieval due to infection and AVN. Average wear rates in the early fracture heads were 64 times greater than those in the infection and AVN retrievals. Given the high wear rates of the early fracture components, such wear may be linked to an increased risk of femoral neck fracture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Tribology of Artificial Hip and Knee Joints)
Open AccessArticle Complications Related to Metal-on-Metal Articulation in Trapeziometacarpal Joint Total Joint Arthroplasty
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(2), 318-327; doi:10.3390/jfb6020318
Received: 21 April 2015 / Accepted: 18 May 2015 / Published: 25 May 2015
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Abstract
Adverse reactions to metal-on-metal (MoM) prostheses are well known from total hip joint resurfacing arthroplasty with elevated serum chrome or cobalt, pain and pseudo tumor formation. It may, however, also be seen after total joint replacement of the trapeziometacarpal joint using MoM [...] Read more.
Adverse reactions to metal-on-metal (MoM) prostheses are well known from total hip joint resurfacing arthroplasty with elevated serum chrome or cobalt, pain and pseudo tumor formation. It may, however, also be seen after total joint replacement of the trapeziometacarpal joint using MoM articulation, and we present two cases of failure of MoM prostheses due to elevated metal-serum levels in one case and pseudo tumor formation in another case. Furthermore, we suggest a diagnostic algorithm for joint pain after MoM trapeziometacarpal joint replacement based on published experiences from MoM hip prostheses and adverse reactions to metal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Tribology of Artificial Hip and Knee Joints)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Effectiveness of Vitamin-E-Doped Polyethylene in Joint Replacement: A Literature Review
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(3), 889-900; doi:10.3390/jfb6030889
Received: 1 July 2015 / Revised: 24 July 2015 / Accepted: 8 August 2015 / Published: 8 September 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (223 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials, such as in bearing components in joint arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve the design and material properties over the last decades. Antioxidants, such as vitamin-E, seem to be a [...] Read more.
Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials, such as in bearing components in joint arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve the design and material properties over the last decades. Antioxidants, such as vitamin-E, seem to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear and degradation in the long-term. Nevertheless, even if several promising in vitro results are available, there is yet no clinical evidence that vitamin-E polyethylenes show these advantages in vivo. The aim of this paper was to provide a comprehensive overview on the current knowledge regarding the biological and mechanical proprieties of this biomaterial, underlying the in vitro and in vivo evidence for effectiveness of vitamin-E-doped polyethylene in joint arthroplasty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Tribology of Artificial Hip and Knee Joints)
Open AccessReview Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty: A Review of Adverse Reactions and Patient Management
J. Funct. Biomater. 2015, 6(3), 486-499; doi:10.3390/jfb6030486
Received: 13 May 2015 / Revised: 12 June 2015 / Accepted: 18 June 2015 / Published: 26 June 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (223 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent alarming joint registry data highlighting increased revision rates has prompted further research into the area of metal-on-metal hip replacements and resurfacings. This review article examines the latest literature on the topic of adverse reactions to metal debris and summarises the most [...] Read more.
Recent alarming joint registry data highlighting increased revision rates has prompted further research into the area of metal-on-metal hip replacements and resurfacings. This review article examines the latest literature on the topic of adverse reactions to metal debris and summarises the most up-to-date guidelines on patient management. Adverse reactions to metal debris can cause significant damage to soft tissue and bone if not diagnosed early. Furthermore, not every patient with an adverse reaction to metal debris will be symptomatic. As such, clinicians must remain vigilant when assessing and investigating these patients in order to detect failing implants and initiate appropriate management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Tribology of Artificial Hip and Knee Joints)

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