Special Issue "Novel Lithium Battery Electrode Materials"

A special issue of Inorganics (ISSN 2304-6740). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Solid-State Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christian M. Julien

Physicochimie des Electrolytes et Nanosystèmes Interfaciaux (PHENIX), Université Pierre et Marie Curie—Paris6, UMR 8234, 4 place Jussieu, Paris 75005, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: energy storage and conversion; lithium batteries; materials chemistry; electrode materials; insertion reactions; vibrational spectrocopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inorganic materials have attracted a huge and ever-increasing interest as electrodes, i.e., cathodes and anodes for energy storage and conversion to develop high energy and high power lithium batteries, including lithium metal polymer (LMP) and lithium-ion (LIB) batteries applied to hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs). Both theoretical and experimental studies from a range of disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, electrochemistry, nanoscience) are essential in this ongoing endeavour.

The main focus of this Special Issue is on the latest advances made in materials in the area of electrochemical, energy storage and conversion in the area of lithium batteries (LMP and LIB). These advances cover novel synthetic methods, crystal chemistry, structure and physico-chemical properties, redox reactions and electrochemical performance.

Prof. Dr. Christian M. Julien
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inorganics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Energy storage and conversion
  • Synthesis and characterization techniques
  • Crystal chemistry
  • Charge transfer and transport properties
  • Redox reactions
  • Electrochemical performance
  • Lithium-metal polymer batteries
  • Lithium-ion batteries

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Optimization of Electrochemical Performance of LiFePO4/C by Indium Doping and High Temperature Annealing
Inorganics 2017, 5(4), 67; doi:10.3390/inorganics5040067
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 16 September 2017 / Accepted: 2 October 2017 / Published: 10 October 2017
PDF Full-text (4594 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We have prepared nano-structured In-doped (1 mol %) LiFePO4/C samples by sol–gel method followed by a selective high temperature (600 and 700 °C) annealing in a reducing environment of flowing Ar/H2 atmosphere. The crystal structure, particle size, morphology, and magnetic
[...] Read more.
We have prepared nano-structured In-doped (1 mol %) LiFePO4/C samples by sol–gel method followed by a selective high temperature (600 and 700 °C) annealing in a reducing environment of flowing Ar/H2 atmosphere. The crystal structure, particle size, morphology, and magnetic properties of nano-composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microsopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns of the nano-composites were indexed to the olivine crystal structure of LiFePO4 with space group Pnma, showing minor impurities of Fe2P and Li3PO4 due to decomposition of LiFePO4. We found that the doping of In in LiFePO4/C nanocomposites affects the amount of decomposed products, when compared to the un-doped ones treated under similar conditions. An optimum amount of Fe2P present in the In-doped samples enhances the electronic conductivity to achieve a much improved electrochemical performance. The galvanostatic charge/discharge curves show a significant improvement in the electrochemical performance of 700 °C annealed In-doped-LiFePO4/C sample with a discharge capacity of 142 mAh·g−1 at 1 C rate, better rate capability (~128 mAh·g−1 at 10 C rate, ~75% of the theoretical capacity) and excellent cyclic stability (96% retention after 250 cycles) compared to other samples. This enhancement in electrochemical performance is consistent with the results of our electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showing decreased charge-transfer resistance and high exchange current density. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Lithium Battery Electrode Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Pulsed Current Electrodeposition of Silicon Thin Films Anodes for Lithium Ion Battery Applications
Inorganics 2017, 5(2), 27; doi:10.3390/inorganics5020027
Received: 20 March 2017 / Revised: 16 April 2017 / Accepted: 17 April 2017 / Published: 20 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4270 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electrodeposition of amorphous silicon thin films on Cu substrate from organic ionic electrolyte using pulsed electrodeposition conditions has been studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows a drastic change in the morphology of these electrodeposited silicon thin films at different frequencies of 0, 500,
[...] Read more.
Electrodeposition of amorphous silicon thin films on Cu substrate from organic ionic electrolyte using pulsed electrodeposition conditions has been studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows a drastic change in the morphology of these electrodeposited silicon thin films at different frequencies of 0, 500, 1000, and 5000 Hz studied due to the change in nucleation and the growth mechanisms. These electrodeposited films, when tested in a lithium ion battery configuration, showed improvement in stability and performance with an increase in pulse current frequency during deposition. XPS analysis showed variation in the content of Si and oxygen with the change in frequency of deposition and with the change in depth of these thin films. The presence of oxygen largely due to electrolyte decomposition during Si electrodeposition and the structural instability of these films during the first discharge–charge cycle are the primary reasons contributing to the first cycle irreversible (FIR) loss observed in the pulse electrodeposited Si–O–C thin films. Nevertheless, the silicon thin films electrodeposited at a pulse current frequency of 5000 Hz show a stable capacity of ~805 mAh·g−1 with a fade in capacity of ~0.056% capacity loss per cycle (a total loss of capacity ~246 mAh·g−1) at the end of 500 cycles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Lithium Battery Electrode Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Na1+yVPO4F1+y (0 ≤ y≤ 0.5) as Cathode Materials for Hybrid Na/Li Batteries
Inorganics 2017, 5(2), 19; doi:10.3390/inorganics5020019
Received: 22 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 23 March 2017 / Published: 27 March 2017
PDF Full-text (10952 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Using Rietveld-refined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electrochemical cycling, it was established that among sodium vanadium fluorophosphate compositions Na1+yVPO4F1+y (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.75), the single-phase material Na1.5VPO4F1.5 or Na3V2(PO4)2F3 with a tetragonal structure (the P42/mnm S.G.) is formed
[...] Read more.
Using Rietveld-refined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electrochemical cycling, it was established that among sodium vanadium fluorophosphate compositions Na1+yVPO4F1+y (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.75), the single-phase material Na1.5VPO4F1.5 or Na3V2(PO4)2F3 with a tetragonal structure (the P42/mnm S.G.) is formed only for y = 0.5. The samples with y < 0.5 and y > 0.5 possessed different impurity phases. Na3V2(PO4)2F3 could be considered as a multifunctional cathode material for the fabrication of lithium-ion and sodium-ion high-energy batteries. The reversible discharge capacity of 116 mAh•g−1 was achieved upon cycling Na3V2(PO4)2F3 in a hybrid Na/Li cell. Decrease in discharge capacity for the other samples was in accordance with the amount of the electrochemically active phase Na3V2(PO4)2F3. Na3V2(PO4)2F3 showed good cycleability and a high rate of performance, presumably due to operation in the mixed Na/Li electrolyte. The study of the structure and composition of charged and discharged samples, and the analysis of differential capacity curves showed a negligible Na/Li electrochemical exchange, and a predominant sodium-based cathode reaction. To increase the degree of the Na/Li electrochemical exchange in Na3V2(PO4)2F3, it needs to be desodiated first in a Na cell, and then cycled in a lithium cell. In this case, the electrolyte would be enriched with the Li ions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Lithium Battery Electrode Materials)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Study of Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries: Recent Progress and New Challenges
Inorganics 2017, 5(2), 32; doi:10.3390/inorganics5020032
Received: 5 March 2017 / Revised: 8 April 2017 / Accepted: 20 April 2017 / Published: 28 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (9297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Amongst a number of different cathode materials, the layered nickel-rich LiNiyCoxMn1−yxO2 and the integrated lithium-rich xLi2MnO3·(1 − x)Li[NiaCobMnc]O2 (a
[...] Read more.
Amongst a number of different cathode materials, the layered nickel-rich LiNiyCoxMn1−yxO2 and the integrated lithium-rich xLi2MnO3·(1 − x)Li[NiaCobMnc]O2 (a + b + c = 1) have received considerable attention over the last decade due to their high capacities of ~195 and ~250 mAh·g−1, respectively. Both materials are believed to play a vital role in the development of future electric vehicles, which makes them highly attractive for researchers from academia and industry alike. The review at hand deals with both cathode materials and highlights recent achievements to enhance capacity stability, voltage stability, and rate capability, etc. The focus of this paper is on novel strategies and established methods such as coatings and dopings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Lithium Battery Electrode Materials)
Figures

Open AccessReview Nanotechnology of Positive Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries
Inorganics 2017, 5(2), 25; doi:10.3390/inorganics5020025
Received: 1 March 2017 / Revised: 3 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 April 2017 / Published: 14 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work presents the recent progress in nanostructured materials used as positive electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Three classes of host lattices for lithium insertion are considered: transition-metal oxides V2O5, α-NaV2O5, α-MnO2, olivine-like
[...] Read more.
This work presents the recent progress in nanostructured materials used as positive electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Three classes of host lattices for lithium insertion are considered: transition-metal oxides V2O5, α-NaV2O5, α-MnO2, olivine-like LiFePO4, and layered compounds LiNi0.55Co0.45O2, LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 and Li2MnO3. First, a brief description of the preparation methods shows the advantage of a green process, i.e., environmentally friendliness wet chemistry, in which the synthesis route using single and mixed chelators is used. The impact of nanostructure and nano-morphology of cathode material on their electrochemical performance is investigated to determine the synthesis conditions to obtain the best electrochemical performance of LIBs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Lithium Battery Electrode Materials)
Figures

Back to Top