Special Issue "Vehicular Communications and Networking"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Esteban Egea-López

Department of Information Technologies and Communications, Technical University of Cartagena, Plaza del Hospital 2, 30202, Cartagena, Spain
E-Mail
Fax: +34 968325973
Interests: vehicular communications; wireless networks; medium access protocols; resource allocation
Guest Editor
Dr. Juan J. Alcaraz

Department of Information Technologies and Communications, Technical University of Cartagena, Plaza del Hospital 2, 30202, Cartagena, Spain
E-Mail
Fax: +34 968325973
Interests: vehicular communications; wireless networks; medium access protocols; resource allocation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Significant efforts are being carried out by industry, academia and public agencies to improve driving safety, provide travel assistance, increase vehicle traffic efficiency and decrease fuel consumption by exploiting vehicular communications and networking technologies. These technologies, which are generally referred to as VANET (Vehicular Ad-hoc Networks) or by the more general term VCS (Vehicular Communication Systems), include vehicle-to-infrastructure, vehicle-to-vehicle communications and can be based on short- and medium-range communication as well as on cellular systems. The development and deployment of VCS are also considered one of the most critical issues for the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) industry.
This special issue seeks for contributions addressing technical and research issues, development projects, standardization activities, and field trials on VCS technologies and applications. Contributions can be of theoretical or practical nature, original results or state-of-the-art surveys of interest to the VCS community, focused on communication issues or on applications. Manuscripts from both academia and industry professionals are welcomed.
This special issue also publishes extended versions of selected papers from VECON 2012 (2nd International Workshop on Vehicular Communications and Networking, http://ait.upct.es/vecon2012/), held in conjunction with WiMob 2012 (8th IEEE International Conference on Wireless and Mobile Computing, Networking and Communications).

Dr. Esteban Egea-López
Dr. Juan J. Alcaraz
Guest Editors

The workshop website is available at: http://ait.upct.es/vecon2012/

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • VCS standardization activities and government policies
  • Architectures and protocols for VCS
  • Intelligent Transportation Systems
  • Cross-layer design and optimization for vehicular networks
  • Medium access control in VCS
  • Resource allocation in VCS
  • Safety applications of VCS
  • Simulation issues for VCS
  • Mobility and vehicular traffic models
  • Vehicular Traffic Management
  • VCS technologies for fuel efficiency and reduced emissions
  • Security, encryption and privacy for vehicular systems
  • Performance, scalability, reliability and efficiency of VCS
  • Human-machine interaction in VCS
  • Driving assistance and comfort applications
  • Networking aspects of VCS
  • QoS and real-time support in VCS
  • Physical layer aspects of the vehicular wireless link
  • Cognitive radio in VCS
  • Delay-tolerant techniques for VCS
  • Deployment issues in VCS
  • Real-world experiences and testbeds

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Sending Safety Video over WiMAX in Vehicle Communications
Future Internet 2013, 5(4), 535-567; doi:10.3390/fi5040535
Received: 6 June 2013 / Revised: 8 August 2013 / Accepted: 28 August 2013 / Published: 31 October 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1099 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reports on the design of an OPNET simulation platform to test the performance of sending real-time safety video over VANET (Vehicular Adhoc NETwork) using the WiMAX technology. To provide a more realistic environment for streaming real-time video, a video model was
[...] Read more.
This paper reports on the design of an OPNET simulation platform to test the performance of sending real-time safety video over VANET (Vehicular Adhoc NETwork) using the WiMAX technology. To provide a more realistic environment for streaming real-time video, a video model was created based on the study of video traffic traces captured from a realistic vehicular camera, and different design considerations were taken into account. A practical controller over real-time streaming protocol is implemented to control data traffic congestion for future road safety development. Our driving video model was then integrated with the WiMAX OPNET model along with a mobility model based on real road maps. Using this simulation platform, different mobility cases have been studied and the performance evaluated in terms of end-to-end delay, jitter and visual experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicular Communications and Networking)
Open AccessArticle Physical Layer Network Coding Based on Integer Forcing Precoded Compute and Forward
Future Internet 2013, 5(3), 439-459; doi:10.3390/fi5030439
Received: 2 July 2013 / Revised: 19 July 2013 / Accepted: 5 August 2013 / Published: 28 August 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (338 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, we address the implementation of physical layer network coding (PNC) based on compute and forward (CF) in relay networks. It is known that the maximum achievable rates in CF-based transmission is limited due to the channel approximations at the relay.
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we address the implementation of physical layer network coding (PNC) based on compute and forward (CF) in relay networks. It is known that the maximum achievable rates in CF-based transmission is limited due to the channel approximations at the relay. In this work, we propose the integer forcing precoder (IFP), which bypasses this maximum rate achievability limitation. Our precoder requires channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter, but only that of the channel between the transmitter and the relay, which is a feasible assumption. The overall contributions of this paper are three-fold. Firstly, we propose an implementation of CF using IFP and prove that this implementation achieves higher rates as compared to traditional relaying schemes. Further, the probability of error from the proposed scheme is shown to have up to 2 dB of gain over the existent lattice network coding-based implementation of CF. Secondly, we analyze the two phases of transmission in the CF scheme, thereby characterizing the end-to-end behavior of the CF and not only one-phase behavior, as in previous proposals. Finally, we develop decoders for both the relay and the destination. We use a generalization of Bezout’s theorem to justify the construction of these decoders. Further, we make an analytical derivation of the end-to-end probability of error for cubic lattices using the proposed scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicular Communications and Networking)
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Open AccessArticle Cross-Network Information Dissemination in Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs): Experimental Results from a Smartphone-Based Testbed
Future Internet 2013, 5(3), 398-428; doi:10.3390/fi5030398
Received: 1 March 2013 / Revised: 14 June 2013 / Accepted: 5 July 2013 / Published: 5 August 2013
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (5641 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we present an innovative approach for effective cross-network information dissemination, with applications to vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). The proposed approach, denoted as "Cross-Network Effective Traffic Alert Dissemination" (X-NETAD), leverages on the spontaneous formation of local WiFi (IEEE 802.11b) VANETs,
[...] Read more.
In this work, we present an innovative approach for effective cross-network information dissemination, with applications to vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). The proposed approach, denoted as "Cross-Network Effective Traffic Alert Dissemination" (X-NETAD), leverages on the spontaneous formation of local WiFi (IEEE 802.11b) VANETs, with direct connections between neighboring vehicles, in order to disseminate, very quickly and inexpensively, traffic alerts received from the cellular network. The proposed communication architecture has been implemented on Android smartphones. The obtained experimental results show that an effective cross-network information dissemination service can entirely rely on smartphone-based communications. This paves the way to future Internet architectures, where vehicles will play a key role as information destinations and sources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicular Communications and Networking)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle eHealth Service Support in Future IPv6 Vehicular Networks
Future Internet 2013, 5(3), 317-335; doi:10.3390/fi5030317
Received: 1 March 2013 / Revised: 7 May 2013 / Accepted: 5 June 2013 / Published: 27 June 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2931 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent vehicular networking activities include novel automotive applications, such as public vehicle to vehicle/infrastructure (V2X), large scale deployments, machine-to-machine (M2M) integration scenarios, and more. The platform described in this paper focuses on the integration of eHealth in a V2I setting. This is to
[...] Read more.
Recent vehicular networking activities include novel automotive applications, such as public vehicle to vehicle/infrastructure (V2X), large scale deployments, machine-to-machine (M2M) integration scenarios, and more. The platform described in this paper focuses on the integration of eHealth in a V2I setting. This is to allow the use of Internet from a vehicular setting to disseminate health-related information. From an eHealth viewpoint, the use of remote healthcare solutions to record and transmit a patient’s vital signs is a special telemedicine application that helps hospital resident health professionals to optimally prepare the patient’s admittance. From the automotive perspective, this is a typical vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication scenario. This proposal provides an IPv6 vehicular platform, which integrates eHealth devices and allows sending captured health-related data to a personal health record (PHR) application server in the IPv6 Internet. The collected data is viewed remotely by a doctor and supports his diagnostic decision. In particular, our work introduces the integration of vehicular and eHealth testbeds, describes related work and presents a lightweight auto-configuration method based on a DHCPv6 extension to provide IPv6 connectivity with a few numbers of messages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicular Communications and Networking)
Open AccessArticle Optimization of Vehicular Trajectories under Gaussian Noise Disturbances
Future Internet 2013, 5(1), 1-20; doi:10.3390/fi5010001
Received: 7 November 2012 / Revised: 6 December 2012 / Accepted: 19 December 2012 / Published: 27 December 2012
PDF Full-text (428 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays, research on Vehicular Technology aims at automating every single mechanical element of vehicles, in order to increase passengers’ safety, reduce human driving intervention and provide entertainment services on board. Automatic trajectory tracing for vehicles under especially risky circumstances is a field of
[...] Read more.
Nowadays, research on Vehicular Technology aims at automating every single mechanical element of vehicles, in order to increase passengers’ safety, reduce human driving intervention and provide entertainment services on board. Automatic trajectory tracing for vehicles under especially risky circumstances is a field of research that is currently gaining enormous attention. In this paper, we show some results on how to develop useful policies to execute maneuvers by a vehicle at high speeds with the mathematical optimization of some already established mobility conditions of the car. We also study how the presence of Gaussian noise on measurement sensors while maneuvering can disturb motion and affect the final trajectories. Different performance criteria for the optimization of such maneuvers are presented, and an analysis is shown on how path deviations can be minimized by using trajectory smoothing techniques like the Kalman Filter. We finalize the paper with a discussion on how communications can be used to implement these schemes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vehicular Communications and Networking)
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