Special Issue "Internet Security"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Steven Furnell

Centre for Security, Communications and Network Research, Plymouth University, Drake Circus Plymouth Devon PL4 8AA, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cybercrime, intrusion detection and response, user authentication, usable security, security culture.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Internet, and its related technologies and services, has undeniably affected the everyday lives of millions of people.  We now depend upon it for day-to-day communications in both our business and personal lives, and are becoming ever more reliant upon the wider applications that it supports.  However, having been designed with little attention towards security, the Internet is still by no means secure, and offers many opportunities for attack.

This special issue invites papers addressing and advancing security-related themes in the Internet context, including the issues that increasingly arise as a result of mobile and wireless access.  Topics of interest include (but are not limited to) the core technologies and protocols that can provide protection at the network level, through to new measures that can be taken to safeguard the applications that run on top of this infrastructure.  The scope also includes issues relating to the use and governance of the Internet, such as censorship, surveillance and privacy.

Professor Steven Furnell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • network security
  • intrusion detection
  • security protocols
  • privacy
  • mobile security
  • malicious software

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle A Hierarchical Multitier Approach for Privacy Policies in e-Government Environments
Future Internet 2015, 7(4), 500-515; doi:10.3390/fi7040500
Received: 11 August 2015 / Revised: 1 December 2015 / Accepted: 9 December 2015 / Published: 21 December 2015
PDF Full-text (613 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The appeal of e-Government users to retain control over their personal information, while making use of advanced governmental electronic services through interconnected and interoperable deployments, can be assisted by the incorporation of privacy policy and Preferences documents. This paper addresses the formulation of
[...] Read more.
The appeal of e-Government users to retain control over their personal information, while making use of advanced governmental electronic services through interconnected and interoperable deployments, can be assisted by the incorporation of privacy policy and Preferences documents. This paper addresses the formulation of light-weight and accurate privacy policies, while preserving compliance with underlying legal and regulatory framework. Through the exploitation of existing governmental hierarchies, a multitier approach is proposed able to support diverge data needs and processing requests imposed by service providers. The incorporation of this approach into e-Government environments will reduce the administrative workload, imposed by the inclusion of privacy policy documents, and promote the implementation and provision of user-centric and data privacy aware electronic services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Security)
Open AccessArticle The Future Internet: A World of Secret Shares
Future Internet 2015, 7(4), 445-464; doi:10.3390/fi7040445
Received: 27 April 2015 / Accepted: 12 October 2015 / Published: 24 November 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (493 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is crumbling, partially due to the lack of a strong understanding of how encryption actually works, but also due to weaknesses in its implementation. This paper outlines an Internet storage technique using secret sharing methods which could be
[...] Read more.
The Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is crumbling, partially due to the lack of a strong understanding of how encryption actually works, but also due to weaknesses in its implementation. This paper outlines an Internet storage technique using secret sharing methods which could be used to overcome the problems inherent with PKI, while supporting new types of architectures incorporating such things as automated failover and break-glass data recovery. The paper outlines a novel architecture: SECRET, which supports a robust cloud-based infrastructure with in-built privacy and failover. In order to understand the performance overhead of SECRET, the paper outlines a range of experiments that investigate the overhead of this and other secret share methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Security)
Open AccessArticle Vehicular Internet: Security & Privacy Challenges and Opportunities
Future Internet 2015, 7(3), 257-275; doi:10.3390/fi7030257
Received: 28 April 2015 / Accepted: 9 July 2015 / Published: 24 July 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The vehicular internet will drive the future of vehicular technology and intelligent transportation systems (ITS). Whether it is road safety, infotainment, or driver-less cars, the vehicular internet will lay the foundation for the future of road travel. Governments and companies are pursuing driver-less
[...] Read more.
The vehicular internet will drive the future of vehicular technology and intelligent transportation systems (ITS). Whether it is road safety, infotainment, or driver-less cars, the vehicular internet will lay the foundation for the future of road travel. Governments and companies are pursuing driver-less vehicles as they are considered to be more reliable than humans and, therefore, safer. The vehicles today are not just a means of transportation but are also equipped with a wide range of sensors that provide valuable data. If vehicles are enabled to share data that they collect with other vehicles or authorities for decision-making and safer driving, they thereby form a vehicular network. However, there is a lot at stake in vehicular networks if they are compromised. With the stakes so high, it is imperative that the vehicular networks are secured and made resilient to any attack or attempt that may have serious consequences. The vehicular internet can also be the target of a cyber attack, which can be devastating. In this paper, the opportunities that the vehicular internet offers are presented and then various security and privacy aspects are discussed and some solutions are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Security)
Open AccessArticle EDAS: An Evaluation Prototype for Autonomic Event-Driven Adaptive Security in the Internet of Things
Future Internet 2015, 7(3), 225-256; doi:10.3390/fi7030225
Received: 11 March 2015 / Revised: 12 June 2015 / Accepted: 23 June 2015 / Published: 8 July 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3705 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In Internet of Things (IoT), the main driving technologies are considered to be tiny sensory objects. These objects cannot host traditional preventive and detective technologies to provide protection against the increasing threat sophistication. Furthermore, these solutions are limited to analyzing particular contextual information,
[...] Read more.
In Internet of Things (IoT), the main driving technologies are considered to be tiny sensory objects. These objects cannot host traditional preventive and detective technologies to provide protection against the increasing threat sophistication. Furthermore, these solutions are limited to analyzing particular contextual information, for instance network information or files, and do not provide holistic context for risk analysis and response. Analyzing a part of a situation may lead to false alarms and later to unnecessary and incorrect configurations. To overcome these concerns, we proposed an event-driven adaptive security (EDAS) model for IoT. EDAS aims to observe security events (changes) generated by various things in the monitored IoT environment, investigates any intentional or unintentional risks associated with the events and adapts to it autonomously. It correlates different events in time and space to reduce any false alarms and provides a mechanism to predict attacks before they are realized. Risks are responded to autonomically by utilizing a runtime adaptation ontology. The mitigation action is chosen after assessing essential information, such as the risk faced, user preferences, device capabilities and service requirements. Thus, it selects an optimal mitigation action in a particular adverse situation. The objective of this paper is to investigate EDAS feasibility and its aptitude as a real-world prototype in a remote patient monitoring context. It details how EDAS can be a practical choice for IoT-eHealth in terms of the security, design and implementation features it offers as compared to traditional security controls. We have explained the prototype’s major components and have highlighted the key technical challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Security)
Open AccessArticle Inefficiency of IDS Static Anomaly Detectors in Real-World Networks
Future Internet 2015, 7(2), 94-109; doi:10.3390/fi7020094
Received: 14 November 2014 / Revised: 25 March 2015 / Accepted: 31 March 2015 / Published: 6 May 2015
PDF Full-text (1014 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A wide range of IDS implementations with anomaly detection modules have been deployed. In general, those modules depend on intrusion knowledge databases, such as Knowledge Discovery Dataset (KDD99), Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA) or Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data at
[...] Read more.
A wide range of IDS implementations with anomaly detection modules have been deployed. In general, those modules depend on intrusion knowledge databases, such as Knowledge Discovery Dataset (KDD99), Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA) or Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data at Dartmouth (CRAWDAD), among others. Once the database is analyzed and a machine learning method is employed to generate detectors, some classes of new detectors are created. Thereafter, detectors are supposed to be deployed in real network environments in order to achieve detection with good results for false positives and detection rates. Since the traffic behavior is quite different according to the user’s network activities over available services, restrictions and applications, it is supposed that behavioral-based detectors are not well suited to all kind of networks. This paper presents the differences of detection results between some network scenarios by applying traditional detectors that were calculated with artificial neural networks. The same detector is deployed in different scenarios to measure the efficiency or inefficiency of static training detectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Security)
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