Special Issue "Plants Used in Cosmetics"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Claudia Juliano

Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Universita degli Studi di Sassari, Sassari, Italy
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vegetal extracts and herbs have been used for cosmetic purposes by many civilizations since time immemorial, and plants were, for centuries, the only way to obtain colorants, fragrances and products for soothing and protecting skin. In more recent times, with the development of chemistry and petrochemistry, synthetic raw materials of interest to the cosmetic industry became available in huge quantities and at low price and largely replaced natural extracts and compounds. However, in the last few decades cosmetic ingredients based on plants or plants derivatives have made a powerful comeback, and claims referring to “plant origin”, “natural origin” and “naturally derived”—to name just a few—have become a major trend in the field of beauty. This trend reversal is largely consumer-driven and depends on several reasons; they include the increasing aversion for animal-derived products, ecological concerns and—probably the most important—the large number of myths about the safety of some controversial cosmetic ingredients that in recent times pervaded the media and the net. These health-related allegations involve specific chemicals (being parabens the most debated), and, although there is no conclusive scientific evidence of health risk for these compounds, a rising number of consumers are concerned about them and demand their replacement with natural alternatives, perceived as safer than synthetic products. As a consequence, plant ingredients in cosmetics are continually gaining popularity. Today, it is widely contended that the plant kingdom represents an enormous reservoir of biologically active chemicals, which are widely employed in medicine to treat all kind of illnesses and can also act as functional substances in cosmetic formulations. Products of plant origin used in cosmetics include vegetable oils and other lipids, essential oils used as fragrances or for their antimicrobial activities, ingredients for skincare and hair care, and antioxidants, to name just a few. Nowadays, plant material used to produce cosmetic ingredients comes from a variety of sources, which include not only conventional horticultural production (in field or greenhouse), but also wild harvest in developing countries and biotechnological methods (e.g., tissue cultures, hydroponic systems, fermentation of genetically modified organisms, microalgae cultures). The multiplicity of sources of plant cosmetic ingredients poses many different ethical and scientific issues previously not considered or underestimated, such as sustainability of the supply chain, preservation of biodiversity, improved isolation and extraction techniques, the evaluation of safety of new raw materials, and, finally, the development of innovative formulations.

This Special Issue is dedicated to plants used for the development of cosmetics (both botanical species of traditional use and exotic plants introduced in cosmetics to fulfil market demand), innovative plant-based cosmetic ingredients, and potential cosmetic use of plants traditionally intended for other purposes.

Original research articles and reviews are welcomed and encouraged.

Dr. Claudia Juliano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plants
  • Cosmetics
  • Natural ingredients
  • Herbal products

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Herbal Cosmetics Knowledge of Arab-Choa and Kotoko Ethnic Groups in the Semi-Arid Areas of Far North Cameroon: Ethnobotanical Assessment and Phytochemical Review
Received: 31 March 2018 / Revised: 21 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 2 May 2018
PDF Full-text (1884 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The plant-based traditional knowledge of many Cameroonian populations concerning beauty and skin care is still poorly documented, yet they are real resources of innovation and economic development. The aim of this study is to document the indigenous knowledge of Choa Arab and Kotoko
[...] Read more.
The plant-based traditional knowledge of many Cameroonian populations concerning beauty and skin care is still poorly documented, yet they are real resources of innovation and economic development. The aim of this study is to document the indigenous knowledge of Choa Arab and Kotoko ethnic group in Kousséri (Far North Region of Cameroon) about plants used for cosmetics. Ethnobotanical data collected among key informants revealed a total of 13 plants species belonging to 12 families used by local people. Canarium schweinfurthii Engl and Santalum album L. obtained the highest frequency of citation. Trees are the most abundant life forms, while barks and seeds are the most frequently used parts. More than 40% of recorded plants are used for skin care. The cosmetic allegations of recorded plants include: dermatology, anti-cancers, antioxidant agent, perfume, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, wounds healing activity, skin lightening, dental caries, astringent and hair care. They all contain various phytochemicals that are of interest in cosmetics. Despite the strong relationship between the Choa Arab and Kotoko people and herbal cosmetic ingredients, these plants are still less investigated for their cosmetic application. The authors urge for the development of sustainable supply chain for plants with potentials as cosmetics, involving local communities in the planning, implementation and monitoring process, following principles of Nagoya protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Cosmeceutical Properties of Two Cultivars of Red Raspberry Grown under Different Conditions
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 25 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1633 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Plant selection, input, and field management are proven strategies that produce high yields of crops bearing selected desirable characteristics for the nutraceutical and cosmeceutical industry. This study reports on the effect of substrate and light on selected quantitative and qualitative bioactive properties of
[...] Read more.
Plant selection, input, and field management are proven strategies that produce high yields of crops bearing selected desirable characteristics for the nutraceutical and cosmeceutical industry. This study reports on the effect of substrate and light on selected quantitative and qualitative bioactive properties of two cultivars of Rubus idaeus L (‘Ruvi’ and ‘Cayuga’). Our results demonstrated that the quantitative and qualitative fruit characteristics (yield, fruit dimensions, titratable acidity, and total soluble solids contents), plant growth, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, and total antioxidant capacity, are significantly affected by genotype, light intensity, and substrate type. Fruits from ‘Ruvi’ plants cultivated under low light conditions, on soil/peat substrate exhibited high levels of antioxidant capacity, phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and high inhibitory potency towards the skin-regulating enzymes tyrosinase and elastase. Extract derived from these fruits was formulated into a topical skin care cream. This cream exhibited excellent compatibility and stability characteristics. Our research concluded that quantity and quality of Rubus idaeus L. fruits could be efficiently managed through conventional agronomic practices. Our project determined the optimal agronomic management practices to produce desirable characteristics and maximize bioactive content that determine the nutraceutical and cosmeceutical quality of the red raspberry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Development of a Natural Anti-Age Ingredient Based on Quercus pubescens Willd. Leaves Extract—A Case Study
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
PDF Full-text (2352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Consumers pay more and more attention not just to the safety and health aspects of ingredients entering their cosmetics’ formulations, but also to their potency, origin, processing, ethical value and environmental footprint. Sustainability of the supply chain, preservation of biodiversity, as well as
[...] Read more.
Consumers pay more and more attention not just to the safety and health aspects of ingredients entering their cosmetics’ formulations, but also to their potency, origin, processing, ethical value and environmental footprint. Sustainability of the supply chain, preservation of biodiversity, as well as greener extraction techniques are hence very popular with consumers. Consumers are primarily concerned by the efficacy of the cosmetic products they use and continuously scrutinize product labels, so marketing arguments need to be based on rigorous testing and reliable results to support claims (anti-age, anti-pollution, etc.) displayed on the product’s packaging. As a result, the increasing demand for natural ingredients with assessed bioactivities has profoundly modified the strategies adopted by cosmetic professionals to innovate in terms of actives. Sourcing and developing new natural cosmetic actives is a long-term procedure that is thoroughly described in the present paper, via the example of the design of both liquid and solid ingredients based on Quercus pubescens Willd. leaves extract, for which anti-age properties were assessed by a combination of in vitro assays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Whitening Agents from Reseda luteola L. and Their Chemical Characterization Using Combination of CPC, UPLC-HRMS and NMR
Received: 5 November 2017 / Revised: 22 November 2017 / Accepted: 23 November 2017 / Published: 25 November 2017
PDF Full-text (1155 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Skin whitening agents occupy an important part of the dermo-cosmetic market nowadays. They are used to treat various skin pigmentation disorders, or simply to obtain a lighter skin tone. The use of traditional skin bleachers (e.g., hydroquinone, corticoids) is now strictly regulated due
[...] Read more.
Skin whitening agents occupy an important part of the dermo-cosmetic market nowadays. They are used to treat various skin pigmentation disorders, or simply to obtain a lighter skin tone. The use of traditional skin bleachers (e.g., hydroquinone, corticoids) is now strictly regulated due to their side effects. When considering this and the growing consumers’ interest for more natural ingredients, plant extracts can be seen as safe and natural alternatives. In this perspective, in vitro bioassays were undertaken to assess cosmetic potential of Reseda luteola, and particularly its promising whitening activities. A bioguided purification procedure employing centrifugal partition chromatography, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS) and NMR was developed to isolate and identify the whitening agents (i.e., luteolin and apigenin) from aerial parts of R. luteola. UPLC-HRMS also enabled the characterization of acetylated luteolin- and apigenin-O-glycosides, which occurrence is reported for the first time in R. luteola. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview Secondary Plant Metabolites for Sun Protective Cosmetics: From Pre-Selection to Product Formulation
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 2 May 2018
PDF Full-text (3518 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Topical sun protective cosmetics (sunscreens, pre- and post-sun) have been intensively developed and produced to protect human skin against solar irradiation-associated damages/pathologies. Unfortunately, routine cosmetics for sun protection containing synthetic organic and/or physical sunscreens could exert adverse effects towards human organisms and bring
[...] Read more.
Topical sun protective cosmetics (sunscreens, pre- and post-sun) have been intensively developed and produced to protect human skin against solar irradiation-associated damages/pathologies. Unfortunately, routine cosmetics for sun protection containing synthetic organic and/or physical sunscreens could exert adverse effects towards human organisms and bring undesirable ecological changes. Terrestrial and marine plant species, being exposed to sun light for hundreds of millions of years, have evolved two pro-survival strategies: effective protection against/adaptation to its deleterious effects and the use of solar energy for photosynthesis/photo-biochemical reactions. Secondary plant metabolites (SPM) are primary sensors of solar energy and mediators of its use (photo-sensitisers) or neutralisation (photo-protectors). A similar double photo-protective/photo-sensitising system is built in within human skin. Modern development of toxicologically/ecologically safe yet effective sun-protective cosmetics attempts to pre-select photo-stable and non-phototoxic SPMs that provide broad UVA + UVB sunscreen, free radical scavenging and direct antioxidant defence, endogenous antioxidant rescue, induction of antioxidant enzymes (indirect antioxidant defence), and normalisation of metabolic and immune responses to UVA + UVB. Proper formulation of sun protective cosmetics should assure targeted delivery of photo-active SPMs to definite skin layers to invigorate the built in photo-chemical skin barrier. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperReview A Critical View of Different Botanical, Molecular, and Chemical Techniques Used in Authentication of Plant Materials for Cosmetic Applications
Received: 6 April 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 1 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A number of approaches can be implemented to ensure plant-based material authentication for cosmetic applications. Doing this requires knowledge and data dealing with botany, molecular biology, and analytical chemistry, the main techniques of which are described here. A comprehensive and critical view of
[...] Read more.
A number of approaches can be implemented to ensure plant-based material authentication for cosmetic applications. Doing this requires knowledge and data dealing with botany, molecular biology, and analytical chemistry, the main techniques of which are described here. A comprehensive and critical view of the methods is provided with comments as well as examples of their application domains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Cosmetic Functional Ingredients from Botanical Sources for Anti-Pollution Skincare Products
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 19 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (489 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Air pollution is a rising problem in many metropolitan areas around the world. Airborne contaminants are predominantly derived from anthropogenic activities, and include carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, ozone and particulate matter (PM; a mixture of solid and liquid
[...] Read more.
Air pollution is a rising problem in many metropolitan areas around the world. Airborne contaminants are predominantly derived from anthropogenic activities, and include carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, ozone and particulate matter (PM; a mixture of solid and liquid particles of variable size and composition, able to absorb and delivery a large number of pollutants). The exposure to these air pollutants is associated to detrimental effects on human skin, such as premature aging, pigment spot formation, skin rashes and eczema, and can worsen some skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. A cosmetic approach to this problem involves the topical application of skincare products containing functional ingredients able to counteract pollution-induced skin damage. Considering that the demand for natural actives is growing in all segments of global cosmetic market, the aim of this review is to describe some commercial cosmetic ingredients obtained from botanical sources able to reduce the impact of air pollutants on human skin with different mechanisms, providing a scientific rationale for their use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Used in Cosmetics)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Review
Title: Contact Allergy to Plant Extracts in Cosmetics
Authors: A. Goossens, L. Gilissen, et al.
Affiliation: Contact Allergy Unit, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, K.U.Leuven Kapucijnenvoer 33, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
Abstract: Contact-allergic reactions related to the presence of plant extracts in cosmetic products may be delayed-type reactions, i.e. allergic contact dermatitis (eczema), but also immediate-type reactions, i.e. contact urticaria and its syndrome, such as from proteins and their hydrolysates.
Reactions to plant materials are complex due to the very large number of ingredients contained in these products, lack of stability and standardization of preparations, possible role of oxidation and degradation, multiple positive reactions and cross-reactions in sensitized subjects, and variable sources of sensitization. Finally, Latin INCI names on the cosmetic labels used for plant extracts represent a pitfall.

 

Back to Top