Special Issue "Seismic-Resistant Building Design"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ali M. Memari (Website)

The Pennsylvania Housing Research Center (PHRC), Department of Architectural Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 219 Sackett, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Phone: +1-814-863-9788
Interests: residential and commercial buildings analysis; evaluation; testing; and design; laboratory testing; evaluation; development of light-frame; masonry; cladding; envelope systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Consideration of earthquake induced loading and deformation in building design has become a routine requirement in most countries. Material specific design codes (steel, concrete, masonry, wood, etc.) are being developed in more coordination with the codes that govern the loading requirements. Advanced design concepts and lateral load resisting systems are being adopted by design professionals more widely. Performance-based design approach is also being applied to design of some buildings, although it is not part of the code yet. As most existing buildings have not been constructed based on the more stringent requirements of seismic code provisions, seismic retrofit of existing buildings continues to be in high demand. Finally, considering the need for resiliency of buildings under multiple hazard conditions, the issue of multi-hazard resistant design of buildings has attracted much attention over the past few years.

For this Special Issue of the Buildings Journal, authors are invited to submit papers related to the general theme of the Special Issue for all types of buildings. Among relevant topics, submission of papers discussing analysis, design, evaluation, assessment, rating, and retrofit of buildings for performance under earthquake effects is highly encouraged. In addition, it is of interest to invite contributions that address new code requirements/provisions (material or loading), innovative seismic resisting systems, performance-based seismic design, and multi-hazard resistant building design.

Prof. Dr. Ali M. Memari
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • seismic code provisions
  • earthquake resistant design
  • seismic evaluation and retrofit
  • performance-based design
  • multi-hazard design
  • design for resiliency

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Time-History Seismic Analysis of Masonry Buildings: A Comparison between Two Non-Linear Modelling Approaches
Buildings 2015, 5(2), 597-621; doi:10.3390/buildings5020597
Received: 25 February 2015 / Revised: 13 May 2015 / Accepted: 18 May 2015 / Published: 26 May 2015
PDF Full-text (1875 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper presents a comparison between two numerical modelling approaches employed to investigate the seismic behavior of unreinforced masonry buildings with flexible diaphragms. The comparison is performed analyzing a two-story prototype tested on a shaking table at the CNR-ENEA research center of [...] Read more.
The paper presents a comparison between two numerical modelling approaches employed to investigate the seismic behavior of unreinforced masonry buildings with flexible diaphragms. The comparison is performed analyzing a two-story prototype tested on a shaking table at the CNR-ENEA research center of Casaccia (Italy). The first numerical model was built by using the finite element (FE) technique, while the second one was built by a simplified macro-element (ME) approach. Both models were employed to perform non-linear dynamic analyses, integrating the equations of motion by step-by-step procedures. The shaking table tests were simulated to analyze the behavior of the prototype from the initial elastic state until the development of extensive damage. The main results of the analyses are discussed and critically compared in terms of engineering parameters, such as accelerations, displacements and base shears. The effectiveness of both models within the investigated typology of buildings is then evaluated in depth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Open AccessArticle The Dissipative Column: A New Hysteretic Damper
Buildings 2015, 5(1), 163-178; doi:10.3390/buildings5010163
Received: 19 November 2014 / Accepted: 2 February 2015 / Published: 9 February 2015
PDF Full-text (2183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new replaceable hysteretic damper to better control seismic building damage, consisting of two or more adjacent steel vertical elements connected to each other with continuous mild/low strength steel shear links, is proposed and investigated in this paper. New Dampers, called Dissipative [...] Read more.
A new replaceable hysteretic damper to better control seismic building damage, consisting of two or more adjacent steel vertical elements connected to each other with continuous mild/low strength steel shear links, is proposed and investigated in this paper. New Dampers, called Dissipative Columns (DC), continuously linked with X-shaped steel plates, provide additional stiffness and damping to a lateral system by using a basic and minimally invasive construction element: the column. Working in a way similar to coupled shear walls, the proposed element behavior is theoretically analyzed at linear and non-linear ranges. In fact, considering different restrained cases, a parametric analysis is developed in order both to evaluate the effect of the main geometrical and structural parameters and to provide the design capacity curves of this new damper. The DC can be considered a new damping device, easy to install in new as well as existing buildings in order to protect them from seismic damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Open AccessArticle SSI on the Dynamic Behaviour of a Historical Masonry Building: Experimental versus Numerical Results
Buildings 2014, 4(4), 978-1000; doi:10.3390/buildings4040978
Received: 28 July 2014 / Revised: 21 October 2014 / Accepted: 10 November 2014 / Published: 28 November 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2701 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A reliable procedure to identify the dynamic behaviour of existing masonry buildings is described in the paper, referring to a representative case study: a historical masonry palace located in Benevento (Italy). Since the building has been equipped with a permanent dynamic monitoring [...] Read more.
A reliable procedure to identify the dynamic behaviour of existing masonry buildings is described in the paper, referring to a representative case study: a historical masonry palace located in Benevento (Italy). Since the building has been equipped with a permanent dynamic monitoring system by the Department of Civil Protection, some of the recorded data, acquired in various operating conditions, have been analysed with basic instruments of the Operational Modal Analysis in order to identify the main eigenfrequencies and vibration modes of the structure. The obtained experimental results have been compared to the numerical outcomes provided by three detailed Finite Element (FE) models of the building. The influence of Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) has been also introduced in the FE model by a sub-structure approach where concentrated springs were placed at the base of the building to simulate the effect of soil and foundation on the global dynamic behaviour of the structure. The obtained results evidence that subsoil cannot a priori be disregarded in identifying the dynamic response of the building. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Open AccessArticle Seismic Collapse Assessment of a 20-Story Steel Moment-Resisting Frame Structure
Buildings 2014, 4(4), 806-822; doi:10.3390/buildings4040806
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 24 September 2014 / Accepted: 20 October 2014 / Published: 28 October 2014
PDF Full-text (1867 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The 2010 edition of the load standard in the United States (U.S.), ASCE 7-10, (Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures) introduced risk-targeted spectral acceleration values for the estimation of seismic design loads. In this study, a 20-story steel moment resisting [...] Read more.
The 2010 edition of the load standard in the United States (U.S.), ASCE 7-10, (Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures) introduced risk-targeted spectral acceleration values for the estimation of seismic design loads. In this study, a 20-story steel moment resisting frame structure located in Century City, CA, USA was designed based on ASCE 7-10 and a probabilistic seismic collapse assessment was conducted. The main goals of this study are: (a) to evaluate whether the design of a typical steel moment-frame structure based on risk-targeted spectral accelerations fulfills the target design collapse level of 1% probability of collapse in 50 years; and (b) to quantify the collapse potential of a tall steel structure design based on the most current U.S. seismic code provisions. The probability of collapse was estimated for two sets of 104 and 224 recorded ground motions, respectively. An evaluation of the results demonstrated that for this specific structure the code-prescribed collapse performance target was reasonably met. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Performance Evaluation of Different Masonry Infill Walls with Structural Fuse Elements Based on In-Plane Cyclic Load Testing
Buildings 2014, 4(4), 605-634; doi:10.3390/buildings4040605
Received: 27 June 2014 / Revised: 4 September 2014 / Accepted: 9 September 2014 / Published: 26 September 2014
PDF Full-text (2667 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper discusses the performance of a structural fuse concept developed for use as a seismic isolation system in the design and retrofit of masonry infill walls. An experimental program was developed and executed to study the behavior of the structural fuse [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the performance of a structural fuse concept developed for use as a seismic isolation system in the design and retrofit of masonry infill walls. An experimental program was developed and executed to study the behavior of the structural fuse system under cyclic loads, and to evaluate the performance of the system with various masonry materials. Cyclic tests were performed by applying displacement controlled loads at the first, second, and third stories of a two-bay, three-story steel test frame with brick infill walls; using a quasi-static loading protocol to create a first mode response in the structural system. A parametric study was also completed by replacing the brick infill panels with infill walls constructed of concrete masonry units and autoclaved aerated concrete blocks, and applying monotonically increasing, displacement controlled loads at the top story of the test frame. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Open AccessArticle Introduction of an Innovative Cladding Panel System for Multi-Story Buildings
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 418-436; doi:10.3390/buildings4030418
Received: 22 June 2014 / Revised: 29 July 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 14 August 2014
PDF Full-text (1104 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An Energy Dissipating Cladding System has been developed for use in buildings designed based on the concept of damage-controlled structure in seismic design. This innovative cladding panel system is capable of functioning both as a structural brace, as well as a source [...] Read more.
An Energy Dissipating Cladding System has been developed for use in buildings designed based on the concept of damage-controlled structure in seismic design. This innovative cladding panel system is capable of functioning both as a structural brace, as well as a source of energy dissipation, without demanding inelastic action and ductility from the basic lateral force resisting system. The structural systems of many modern buildings typically have large openings to accommodate glazing systems, and a popular type of construction uses spandrel precast cladding panels at each floor level that supports strip window systems. The present study focuses on developing spandrel type precast concrete cladding panels as supplementary energy dissipating devices that are added to the basic structural system. Through a series of analytical studies, the result of evaluating the ability of the proposed Energy Dissipating Cladding system to improve the earthquake resistance of the buildings is presented here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)
Open AccessArticle Seismic Evaluation of Structural Insulated Panels in Comparison with Wood-Frame Panels
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 394-417; doi:10.3390/buildings4030394
Received: 29 May 2014 / Accepted: 4 July 2014 / Published: 31 July 2014
PDF Full-text (2396 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Structural Insulated Panel (SIP) wall systems have been used in residential and light commercial buildings for the past sixty years. Lack of sufficient published research on racking load performance and limited understanding of the influence of fastener types on seismic response has [...] Read more.
Structural Insulated Panel (SIP) wall systems have been used in residential and light commercial buildings for the past sixty years. Lack of sufficient published research on racking load performance and limited understanding of the influence of fastener types on seismic response has been a deterrent in widespread use of the wall system in seismically active areas. This paper presents the results of a study involving a total of twenty one 2.4 m × 2.4 m shear walls tested under monotonic and cyclic loading. Four different 114 mm thick SIP panel configurations and one traditional wood frame wall were tested under monotonic loading according to ASTM E 564-06; and thirteen 114 mm thick SIP panels and three wood frame walls were tested under the CUREE loading protocol according to ASTM E 2126-11. Parameters such as fastener type; spline design; hold-down anchor location; and sheathing bearing were adjusted throughout the testing in order to determine their effects on the SIP’s performance. Performance parameters such as peak load and displacement; energy dissipation; allowable drift load capacity and seismic compatibility were determined for all of the specimens. Such parameters were then used to demonstrate the SIP walls’ compatibility with the wood frame walls and to determine the efficiency of the different SIP wall configuration and spline systems employed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Self-Centering Seismic Lateral Force Resisting Systems: High Performance Structures for the City of Tomorrow
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 520-548; doi:10.3390/buildings4030520
Received: 12 June 2014 / Revised: 3 September 2014 / Accepted: 4 September 2014 / Published: 18 September 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (918 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Structures designed in accordance with even the most modern buildings codes are expected to sustain damage during a severe earthquake; however; these structures are expected to protect the lives of the occupants. Damage to the structure can require expensive repairs; significant business [...] Read more.
Structures designed in accordance with even the most modern buildings codes are expected to sustain damage during a severe earthquake; however; these structures are expected to protect the lives of the occupants. Damage to the structure can require expensive repairs; significant business downtime; and in some cases building demolition. If damage occurs to many structures within a city or region; the regional and national economy may be severely disrupted. To address these shortcomings with current seismic lateral force resisting systems and to work towards more resilient; sustainable cities; a new class of seismic lateral force resisting systems that sustains little or no damage under severe earthquakes has been developed. These new seismic lateral force resisting systems reduce or prevent structural damage to nonreplaceable structural elements by softening the structural response elastically through gap opening mechanisms. To dissipate seismic energy; friction elements or replaceable yielding energy dissipation elements are also included. Post-tensioning is often used as a part of these systems to return the structure to a plumb; upright position (self-center) after the earthquake has passed. This paper summarizes the state-of-the art for self-centering seismic lateral force resisting systems and outlines current research challenges for these systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic-Resistant Building Design)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Buildings Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
buildings@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Buildings
Back to Top