Special Issue "Building Performance Analysis and Simulation"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ismet Ugursal

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax B3H 4R2, Nova Scotia, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 902 494 2246
Fax: +1 902 423 6711
Interests: building stock modeling; building energy consumption and conservation; HVAC systems; energy efficient buildings; zero energy/emission buildings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the complexity of energy and environmental systems in buildings increase, the need to assess a building’s performance from a variety of viewpoints, such as energy use and demand, comfort, day-lighting and renewable energy potential, increases. Owing to the complexity of the systems as well as the buildings themselves, the only way to conduct such assessments is by computer simulation. Thus, building performance analysis and simulation is now routinely required in new building/community planning and design, as well as for retrofit projects involving existing buildings/communities.

Considering the increasing use and importance of building performance analysis and simulation, Buildings has decided to devote a Special Issue to bring together articles that focus on this topic.

For this Special Issue of Buildings on “Building Performance Analysis and Simulation”, we are looking for original papers that report on topics such as:

  • software tools used in building performance analysis and simulation, including new approaches and software as well as critical/comparative evaluation of existing software
  • unique and interesting studies reporting on building performance analysis and simulation
  • studies that provide insight into building performance analysis and simulation
  • studies that report on the use of building performance analysis and simulation for policy making purposes

Original papers that address other related topics are also welcome.

The timeline for the special issue is as follows:

October 31, 2013: Abstracts/article proposals due (500 words maximum)
November 15, 2013: Notice of acceptance of proposals
February 28, 2014: Full manuscripts due

Papers will be published after acceptance following a full peer-review process.

Prof. Dr. V. Ismet Ugursal, PEng, FCSME
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • building performance analysis
  • building performance simulation
  • building performance modelling
  • building energy simulation
  • building energy simulation software
  • building performance metrics
  • building performance indicators
  • high performance buildings

Published Papers (10 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-10
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Building Performance Analysis and Simulation: We’ve Come a Long Way
Buildings 2014, 4(4), 762-763; doi:10.3390/buildings4040762
Received: 9 October 2014 / Accepted: 13 October 2014 / Published: 17 October 2014
PDF Full-text (154 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Back in 1981, when I started doing building energy performance simulation for pre-design and energy efficiency retrofit work, building simulation was in its infancy. There were only a handful of building energy simulation programs, with DOE-2, ESP-II, BLAST, TRACE and MERIWHETHER being the
[...] Read more.
Back in 1981, when I started doing building energy performance simulation for pre-design and energy efficiency retrofit work, building simulation was in its infancy. There were only a handful of building energy simulation programs, with DOE-2, ESP-II, BLAST, TRACE and MERIWHETHER being the most commonly used ones by consultants [1]. These programs required "mainframe" computers, so I used to prepare the input files on a Radio Shack TRS-80, send it over a telephone modem to a company in Toronto that ran the simulation on a mainframe computer overnight and shipped the printed output to me by courier in the morning. Each run had a turn-around time of almost 48 h, and the run-time and courier charges were about $100, almost as much as a day's salary for a young engineer. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Parameters Influencing the Moisture Buffering Potential of Hygroscopic Materials with BSim Simulations
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 375-393; doi:10.3390/buildings4030375
Received: 17 June 2014 / Revised: 15 July 2014 / Accepted: 16 July 2014 / Published: 23 July 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Validated by a large-scale experimental investigation on moisture buffering (MB) effect, a whole building Heat, Air and Moisture (HAM) simulation tool, BSim, is applied to evaluate the impact of a number of parameters on the moisture buffering potential of a full-scale test room
[...] Read more.
Validated by a large-scale experimental investigation on moisture buffering (MB) effect, a whole building Heat, Air and Moisture (HAM) simulation tool, BSim, is applied to evaluate the impact of a number of parameters on the moisture buffering potential of a full-scale test room finished with hygroscopic materials. The Maximum Accumulated Moisture Buffering Value (MAMBV), developed from the moisture balance analyses in the experimental study, is used in the BSim simulation result analyses to evaluate the impact of various parameters. The parameters investigated include ventilation rates (0.5–5 ACH), types of materials (uncoated gypsum board, wood paneling, orientated strand board, aerated cellular concrete, and telephone book paper), humidity conditions of supply air, volume rates, and steady-state outdoor conditions. It is found that all these parameters have a significant impact on the moisture buffering potential except for the steady-state outdoor conditions. Two material properties, the moisture capacity and vapor permeability, determine the moisture buffering capacities of materials under different moisture generation regimes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Open AccessArticle Experimental and Numerical Analyses of New Massive Wooden Shear-Wall Systems
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 355-374; doi:10.3390/buildings4030355
Received: 5 March 2014 / Revised: 24 June 2014 / Accepted: 25 June 2014 / Published: 14 July 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (4556 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Three innovative massive wooden shear-wall systems (Cross-Laminated-Glued Wall, Cross-Laminated-Stapled Wall, Layered Wall with dovetail inserts) were tested and their structural behaviour under seismic action was assessed with numerical simulations. The wall specimens differ mainly in the method used to assemble the layers of
[...] Read more.
Three innovative massive wooden shear-wall systems (Cross-Laminated-Glued Wall, Cross-Laminated-Stapled Wall, Layered Wall with dovetail inserts) were tested and their structural behaviour under seismic action was assessed with numerical simulations. The wall specimens differ mainly in the method used to assemble the layers of timber boards composing them. Quasi-static cyclic loading tests were carried out and then reproduced with a non-linear numerical model calibrated on the test results to estimate the most appropriate behaviour factor for each system. Non-linear dynamic simulations of 15 artificially generated seismic shocks showed that these systems have good dissipative capacity when correctly designed and that they can be assigned to the medium ductility class of Eurocode 8. This work also shows the influence of deformations in wooden panels and base connectors on the behaviour factor and dissipative capacity of the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Open AccessArticle The Effect of Building Aspect Ratio on Energy Efficiency: A Case Study for Multi-Unit Residential Buildings in Canada
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 336-354; doi:10.3390/buildings4030336
Received: 17 April 2014 / Revised: 24 June 2014 / Accepted: 25 June 2014 / Published: 9 July 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1702 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines the energy consumption of varying aspect ratio in multi-unit residential buildings in Canadian cities. The aspect ratio of a building is one of the most important determinants of energy efficiency. It defines the building surface area by which heat is
[...] Read more.
This paper examines the energy consumption of varying aspect ratio in multi-unit residential buildings in Canadian cities. The aspect ratio of a building is one of the most important determinants of energy efficiency. It defines the building surface area by which heat is transferred between the interior and exterior environment. It also defines the amount of building area that is subject to solar gain. The extent to which this can be beneficial or detrimental depends on the aspect ratio and climate. This paper evaluates the relationship between the geometry of buildings and location to identify a design vernacular for energy-efficient designs across Canada. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Material Efficiency of Building Construction
Buildings 2014, 4(3), 266-294; doi:10.3390/buildings4030266
Received: 21 March 2014 / Revised: 4 May 2014 / Accepted: 16 June 2014 / Published: 1 July 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (346 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Better construction and use of buildings in the European Union would influence 42% of final energy consumption, about 35% of our greenhouse gas emissions and more than 50% of all extracted materials. It could also help to save up to 30% of water
[...] Read more.
Better construction and use of buildings in the European Union would influence 42% of final energy consumption, about 35% of our greenhouse gas emissions and more than 50% of all extracted materials. It could also help to save up to 30% of water consumption. This paper outlines and draws conclusions about different aspects of the material efficiency of buildings and assesses the significance of different building materials on the material efficiency. The research uses an extensive literature study and a case-study in order to assess: should the depletion of materials be ignored in the environmental or sustainability assessment of buildings, are the related effects on land use, energy use and/or harmful emissions significant, should related indicators (such as GHGs) be used to indicate the material efficiency of buildings, and what is the significance of scarce materials, compared to the use of other building materials. This research suggests that the material efficiency should focus on the significant global impacts of material efficiency; not on the individual factors of it. At present global warming and greenhouse gas emissions are among the biggest global problems on which material efficiency has a direct impact on. Therefore, this paper suggests that greenhouse gas emissions could be used as an indicator for material efficiency in building. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Open AccessArticle GIS Modeling of Solar Neighborhood Potential at a Fine Spatiotemporal Resolution
Buildings 2014, 4(2), 195-206; doi:10.3390/buildings4020195
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 11 April 2014 / Accepted: 14 May 2014 / Published: 21 May 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2931 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This research presents a 3D geographic information systems (GIS) modeling approach at a fine spatiotemporal resolution to assess solar potential for the development of smart net-zero energy communities. It is important to be able to accurately identify the key areas on the facades
[...] Read more.
This research presents a 3D geographic information systems (GIS) modeling approach at a fine spatiotemporal resolution to assess solar potential for the development of smart net-zero energy communities. It is important to be able to accurately identify the key areas on the facades and rooftops of buildings that receive maximum solar radiation, in order to prevent losses in solar gain due to obstructions from surrounding buildings and topographic features. A model was created in ArcGIS, in order to efficiently compute and iterate the hourly solar modeling and mapping process over a simulated year. The methodology was tested on a case study area located in southern Ontario, where two different 3D models of the site plan were analyzed. The accuracy of the work depends on the resolution and sky size of the input model. Future work is needed in order to create an efficient iterative function to speed the extraction process of the pixelated solar radiation data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Open AccessArticle Optimum Envelope of a Single-Family House Based on Life Cycle Analysis
Buildings 2014, 4(2), 95-112; doi:10.3390/buildings4020095
Received: 26 February 2014 / Revised: 8 April 2014 / Accepted: 9 April 2014 / Published: 21 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (402 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper describes the methodology used for the life cycle cost (LCC) and life cycle energy (LCE) analyses of the case study house in Quebec, Canada. The TRNSYS energy analysis program is coupled with GenOpt, a general purpose optimization program, for the purpose
[...] Read more.
This paper describes the methodology used for the life cycle cost (LCC) and life cycle energy (LCE) analyses of the case study house in Quebec, Canada. The TRNSYS energy analysis program is coupled with GenOpt, a general purpose optimization program, for the purpose of this study. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is used for the search for the optimum solution. Results show that the optimum levels of insulation should be higher than the reference values, even for the case of LCC analysis. The results are for the most part still valid if electricity costs are assumed to increase below the inflation rate for the duration of the study period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Open AccessArticle Development of a Façade Assessment and Design Tool for Solar Energy (FASSADES)
Buildings 2014, 4(1), 43-59; doi:10.3390/buildings4010043
Received: 24 January 2014 / Revised: 27 February 2014 / Accepted: 3 March 2014 / Published: 13 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1273 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Planning energy-efficient buildings which produce on-site renewable energy in an urban context is a challenge for all involved actors in the planning process. The primary objective of this study was to develop a façade assessment and design tool for solar energy (FASSADES) providing
[...] Read more.
Planning energy-efficient buildings which produce on-site renewable energy in an urban context is a challenge for all involved actors in the planning process. The primary objective of this study was to develop a façade assessment and design tool for solar energy (FASSADES) providing the necessary information for all stakeholders in the design process. The secondary objective was to demonstrate the tool by performing an assessment analysis of a building block. The FASSADES tool is a DIVA4Rhino script, combining Radiance/Daysim and EnergyPlus for simulating the annual production of solar thermal and photovoltaic systems on facades, the cost-effectiveness of the solar energy system, and the payback time. Different output methods are available; graphically within the 3D drawing environment and numerically within post-processing software. The tool was tested to analyse a building block within a city under Swedish conditions. Output of the developed tool showed that shading from nearby buildings greatly affects the feasibility of photovoltaic and solar thermal systems on facades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Figures

Open AccessArticle A Numerical Study on the Impact of Wind Gust Frequency on Air Exchanges in Buildings with Variable External and Internal Leakages
Buildings 2014, 4(1), 27-42; doi:10.3390/buildings4010027
Received: 17 December 2013 / Revised: 20 February 2014 / Accepted: 21 February 2014 / Published: 5 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (403 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wind-driven air infiltration has been recognized among the major reasons for energy loss in buildings, and the impact to energy efficiency under steady conditions has been reported and issued as part of many building codes. The nearly zero-energy building demand makes uncontrolled leakage
[...] Read more.
Wind-driven air infiltration has been recognized among the major reasons for energy loss in buildings, and the impact to energy efficiency under steady conditions has been reported and issued as part of many building codes. The nearly zero-energy building demand makes uncontrolled leakage paths even more undesired and creates the need for further investigation of their behavior under unsteady wind conditions. The present numerical study examines the role of wind gustiness on instantaneous infiltration rates of a low-rise building. For this purpose, two levels of gust frequency Ω have been simulated, expressed as a sinusoidal factor in the wind profile formula. In parallel, a ratio α is employed to represent seven different cases of external leakages distribution, while five scenarios of compartmentalization and internal leakages shows the impact of the latter on the dynamics of building air exchange rates. The results indicate that higher wind gustiness results in higher ACH, marking out gusts as a potential critical factor under unsteady climate conditions. The infiltration rates shown in relation to the leakage distribution ratio α provide arguments for the importance of the detailed detection of external leakages while the comparison of the different internal-volume-scenario highlights the key-role of internal leakages control towards a drastic reduction of infiltration rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Performance Evaluation of Modern Building Thermal Envelope Designs in the Semi-Arid Continental Climate of Tehran
Buildings 2013, 3(4), 674-688; doi:10.3390/buildings3040674
Received: 21 August 2013 / Revised: 27 September 2013 / Accepted: 29 September 2013 / Published: 4 October 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (904 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper we evaluate the thermal performance of a range of modern wall constructions used in the residential buildings of Tehran in order to find the most appropriate alternative to the traditional un-fired clay and brick materials, which are increasingly being replaced
[...] Read more.
In this paper we evaluate the thermal performance of a range of modern wall constructions used in the residential buildings of Tehran in order to find the most appropriate alternative to the traditional un-fired clay and brick materials, which are increasingly being replaced in favor of more slender wall constructions employing hollow clay, autoclaved aerated concrete or light expanded clay aggregate blocks. The importance of improving the building envelope through estimating the potential for energy saving due to the application of the most energy-efficient wall type is presented and the wall constructions currently erected in Tehran are introduced along with their dynamic and steady-state thermal properties. The application of a dynamic simulation tool is explained and the output of the thermal simulation model is compared with the dynamic thermal properties of the wall constructions to assess their performance in summer and in winter. Finally, the best and worst wall type in terms of their cyclic thermal performance and their ability to moderate outdoor conditions is identified through comparison of the predicted indoor temperature and a target comfort temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Building Performance Analysis and Simulation)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Buildings Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
buildings@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Buildings
Back to Top