Special Issue "Optical Memory"

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A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yoshimasa Kawata

Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Naka, Hamamatsu 432-8561, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: laser microscopy, three-dimesinsional imaging theory, photorefractive optics, three-dimensional memory, nonlinear optics Contribution: Special Issue: Optical Memory

Special Issue Information

Submission

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Keywords

  • holographic recording
  • multilayered recording
  • near-field recording
  • multiwavelength recording
  • multi level recording
  • material science
  • nano fabrication
  • signal processing
  • basic theory
  • new applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Shift Multiplex Recording of Four-Valued Phase Data Pages by Volume Retardagraphy
Appl. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 158-170; doi:10.3390/app4020158
Received: 8 December 2013 / Revised: 12 March 2014 / Accepted: 20 March 2014 / Published: 8 April 2014
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Abstract
In this paper, shift multiplex recording of phase data pages on a volume polarization-sensitive medium by retardagraphy is demonstrated. The origin of shift selectivity in volume retardagraphy is explained. In the experiment, four-valued phase data pages are used. Then, a coding method is
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In this paper, shift multiplex recording of phase data pages on a volume polarization-sensitive medium by retardagraphy is demonstrated. The origin of shift selectivity in volume retardagraphy is explained. In the experiment, four-valued phase data pages are used. Then, a coding method is proposed to correct a reconstructed phase pattern. The recorded phase data pages are reconstructed using the feature of the coding method. By comparing the reconstructed phase data pages with recording phase data pages, symbol error rates of less than 11% are achieved. From the experimental result, it is verified that volume retardagraphy is applicable to optical memory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Memory)
Open AccessArticle Shift-Peristrophic Multiplexing for High Density Holographic Data Storage
Appl. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 148-157; doi:10.3390/app4020148
Received: 21 November 2013 / Revised: 5 March 2014 / Accepted: 17 March 2014 / Published: 31 March 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1693 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Holographic data storage is a promising technology that provides very large data storage capacity, and the multiplexing method plays a significant role in increasing this capacity. Various multiplexing methods have been previously researched. In the present study, we propose a shift-peristrophic multiplexing technique
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Holographic data storage is a promising technology that provides very large data storage capacity, and the multiplexing method plays a significant role in increasing this capacity. Various multiplexing methods have been previously researched. In the present study, we propose a shift-peristrophic multiplexing technique that uses spherical reference waves, and experimentally verify that this method efficiently increases the data capacity. In the proposed method, a series of holograms is recorded with shift multiplexing, in which the recording material is rotated with its axis perpendicular to the material’s surface. By iterating this procedure, multiplicity is shown to improve. This method achieves more than 1 Tbits/inch2 data density recording. Furthermore, a capacity increase of several TB per disk is expected by maximizing the recording medium performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Memory)
Open AccessArticle Diffraction Focal Position and Vector Diffraction Theory for Micro Holographic Storage Systems
Appl. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 57-65; doi:10.3390/app4010057
Received: 18 November 2013 / Revised: 12 February 2014 / Accepted: 18 February 2014 / Published: 13 March 2014
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Abstract
In this study, we proposed a method to determine the optimal focal position for micro-holographic storage systems, using vector diffraction theory; the theory provides exact solutions when the numerical aperture (NA) exceeds 0.6. The best diffraction focus was determined by the position and
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In this study, we proposed a method to determine the optimal focal position for micro-holographic storage systems, using vector diffraction theory; the theory provides exact solutions when the numerical aperture (NA) exceeds 0.6. The best diffraction focus was determined by the position and wavelength corresponding to minimal spherical aberration. The calculated refractive index modulation, polarization illumination, and boundary conditions at the interface of different media were analyzed. From the results of our analysis, we could confirm the size of micrograting as a function of NA and wavelength, based on vector diffraction theory, compared with scalar diffraction theory which defines the micrograting by . To demonstrate our analysis, we adapted an optical alignment method using a Twyman-Green interferometer, and could obtain good agreement between analysis and experimental results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Memory)
Open AccessArticle Imaging of Volume Phase Gratings in a Photosensitive Polymer, Recorded in Transmission and Reflection Geometry
Appl. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 19-27; doi:10.3390/app4010019
Received: 30 November 2013 / Revised: 15 January 2014 / Accepted: 24 January 2014 / Published: 20 February 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Volume phase gratings, recorded in a photosensitive polymer by two-beam interference exposure, are studied by means of optical microscopy. Transmission gratings and reflection gratings, with periods in the order of 10 μm down to 130 nm, were investigated. Mapping of holograms by means
[...] Read more.
Volume phase gratings, recorded in a photosensitive polymer by two-beam interference exposure, are studied by means of optical microscopy. Transmission gratings and reflection gratings, with periods in the order of 10 μm down to 130 nm, were investigated. Mapping of holograms by means of imaging in sectional view is introduced to study reflection-type gratings, evading the resolution limit of classical optical microscopy. In addition, this technique is applied to examine so-called parasitic gratings, arising from interference from the incident reference beam and the reflected signal beam. The appearance and possible avoidance of such unintentionally recorded secondary structures is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Memory)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Two-Photon Absorbing Molecules as Potential Materials for 3D Optical Memory
Appl. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 1-18; doi:10.3390/app4010001
Received: 15 November 2013 / Revised: 16 December 2013 / Accepted: 9 January 2014 / Published: 22 January 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review, recent advances in two-photon absorbing photochromic molecules, as potential materials for 3D optical memory, are presented. The investigations introduced in this review indicate that 3D data storage processing at the molecular level is possible. As 3D memory using two-photon absorption
[...] Read more.
In this review, recent advances in two-photon absorbing photochromic molecules, as potential materials for 3D optical memory, are presented. The investigations introduced in this review indicate that 3D data storage processing at the molecular level is possible. As 3D memory using two-photon absorption allows advantages over existing systems, the use of two-photon absorbing photochromic molecules is preferable. Although there are some photochromic molecules with good properties for memory, in most cases, the two-photon absorption efficiency is not high. Photochromic molecules with high two-photon absorption efficiency are desired. Recently, molecules having much larger two-photon absorption cross sections over 10,000 GM (GM= 10−50 cm4 s molecule−1 photon−1) have been discovered and are expected to open the way to realize two-photon absorption 3D data storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Memory)

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