Special Issue "Recent Advances in Horticultural Practices for Berry Crops"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. David R. Bryla

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Horticultural Crop Research Unit, Corvallis, Oregon, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: irrigation; fertilization; and soil management of berry crops

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue examines recent advances in horticultural practices for economically-important berry crops, including blueberry, blackberry, cranberry, raspberry, and strawberry. Systems used for berry production vary widely and range anywhere from open fields to tunnels, greenhouses, and vertical planting systems. No single practice is best for all situations, and success depends on thorough understanding of how the crop grows and responds to changes in the environment. Growers must focus on improving both yield and fruit quality and are constantly challenged by weather, pests and diseases, and market and labor requirements.

We welcome contributions of both reviews and original research on topics such as soil and site preparation, cultivar selection, planting and establishment, pruning and training systems, mulching, irrigation and water requirements, nutrition and fertilizers, combating pests and diseases, and fruit harvest and handling. New information on practices for organic and soilless systems are also encouraged. Ideally, the contributions will cover many of the major growing regions from around the world and will include research from temperate, subtropical, and tropical climates.

Dr. David R. Bryla
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Blackberry
  • Blueberry
  • Fruit quality
  • Irrigation
  • Mulch
  • Nutrient management
  • Pest management
  • Plant disease
  • Raspberry
  • Soil management
  • Strawberry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Pruning and Training Systems Impact Yield and Cold Hardiness of ‘Marion’ Trailing Blackberry
Agriculture 2018, 8(9), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8090134
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 22 August 2018 / Accepted: 24 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
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Abstract
The floricane-fruiting, trailing blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus, Watson) cultivar Marion was evaluated in two plantings for the impact of floricane pruning date. This included leaving the dead canes unpruned and training new primocanes over the dead wood (new-over-old), primocane topping
[...] Read more.
The floricane-fruiting, trailing blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus, Watson) cultivar Marion was evaluated in two plantings for the impact of floricane pruning date. This included leaving the dead canes unpruned and training new primocanes over the dead wood (new-over-old), primocane topping and suppression date in alternate year (AY) and every year (EY) production systems at various planting densities. The presence of primocanes during fruit development did not affect yield of the floricane in the current season but suppressing primocanes to June 30 in Oregon, USA, led to insufficient time for primocane growth, reducing yield of the floricane the following year by 36% relative to no primocane suppression. Pruning out senescing floricanes immediately after fruit harvest or later—thus allowing more time for remobilization of nutrients or reserves—had no impact on yield. However, yield in the new-over-old system was higher, likely due to less training damage to primocanes in this treatment. All of the AY treatments studied led to lower berry weight compared to EY production but this has not been an issue in the processed fruit market to date. Plants in AY production produced more canes per plant than in EY but at the industry standard spacing of 1.5 m, AY plants yielded only 60% to 66% more than EY plants in these studies, despite evidence of plants in AY production having greater cold hardiness. There was no significant effect of planting at higher density (0.6 and 0.9 m) on cumulative yield over 4 years. However, planting at 0.6 m and topping the primocanes to the top trellis wire (1.8 m) increased yield significantly compared to other AY treatments. This alternative production system may offer economic advantages to the 1.5 m EY or AY production systems through reducing management costs and allowing for mechanical pruning and training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Horticultural Practices for Berry Crops)
Open AccessArticle Changes in the Concentration of Leaf Nitrogen over the Season Affect the Diagnosis of Deficiency or Sufficiency in Strawberries in the Subtropics
Agriculture 2018, 8(8), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8080126
Received: 16 April 2018 / Revised: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
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Abstract
Optimum leaf nitrogen (N) concentrations have been identified for strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) in temperate and Mediterranean areas, but whether these values are appropriate for the subtropics is unclear. Two experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine if the seasonal
[...] Read more.
Optimum leaf nitrogen (N) concentrations have been identified for strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) in temperate and Mediterranean areas, but whether these values are appropriate for the subtropics is unclear. Two experiments were conducted for 2 years to determine if the seasonal changes in the concentration of leaf N affect the diagnosis of deficiency or sufficiency of strawberry plants in Queensland, Australia. In 2014, ‘Festival’, ‘Fortuna’, and ‘Winter Dawn’ were planted in early April and grown with and without N for the entire season. Then, ‘Festival’ was planted the following year in mid- or late April and, again, was grown with and without N. Yield was slightly lower with N in 2014, but higher with it the following year, particularly in the early planting. The concentration of total N in young, fully expanded leaves decreased from 3.0% to 2.0% as leaf, crown, and root dry weight increased, while the concentration of nitrate-N (NO3-N) decreased from 1200–3200 to 50–500 mg/kg. These changes in leaf N were large enough to affect the diagnosis of N deficiency or sufficiency. The concentration of leaf N was less variable than the concentration of leaf NO3-N and, therefore, better for estimating the nutrient status of strawberry plants in the subtropics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Horticultural Practices for Berry Crops)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Weed Management in Cranberries: A Historical Perspective and a Look to the Future
Agriculture 2018, 8(9), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8090138
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 29 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
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Abstract
Integrated weed management (IWM) has been part of cranberry cultivation since its inception in the early 19th century. Proper site and cultivar selection, good drainage, rapid vine establishment, and hand weeding are as important now for successful weed management as when the industry
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Integrated weed management (IWM) has been part of cranberry cultivation since its inception in the early 19th century. Proper site and cultivar selection, good drainage, rapid vine establishment, and hand weeding are as important now for successful weed management as when the industry first started. In 1940, Extension publications listed eight herbicides (e.g., petroleum-based products, inorganic salts and sulfates) for weed control. Currently, 18 herbicides representing 11 different modes of action are registered for use on cranberries. Nonchemical methods, such as hand weeding, sanding, flooding, and proper fertilization, remain integral for managing weed populations; new tactics such as flame cultivation have been added to the toolbox. Priority ratings have been developed to aid in weed management planning. Despite many efforts, biological control of weeds remains elusive on the commercial scale. Evaluation of new herbicides, unmanned aerial systems (UAS), image analysis, and precision agriculture technology; investigation of other management practices for weeds and their natural enemies; utilization of computational decision making and Big Data; and determination of the impact of climate change are research areas whose results will translate into new use recommendations for the weed control of cranberry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Horticultural Practices for Berry Crops)
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