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Adm. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2012), Pages 1-134

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Race to the Future: Innovations in Gifted and Enrichment Education in Asia, and Implications for the United States
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 1-25; doi:10.3390/admsci2010001
Received: 26 September 2011 / Revised: 14 November 2011 / Accepted: 5 December 2011 / Published: 12 January 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
How are Asian countries preparing children to have skills—including creativity, innovation, and technical capability—to compete in the 21st Century global economy? Countries including China, Korea, Japan and Singapore have begun to integrate education policy and practice into a key component of national [...] Read more.
How are Asian countries preparing children to have skills—including creativity, innovation, and technical capability—to compete in the 21st Century global economy? Countries including China, Korea, Japan and Singapore have begun to integrate education policy and practice into a key component of national innovation strategies: human capital development. Asian countries are developing an emphasis on innovation and creativity at all levels of education, while the United States continues (via No Child Left Behind testing and budget cut-backs) to move away from that model. Developments in China (including Hong Kong and Taiwan), Korea and Singapore are complemented with comparisons to trends in national policy and private sector practice in Japan and the United States. Preliminary findings indicate that while progress has been made towards establishing education practices that enrich student learning, helping children to reach their highest potential in some countries, cultural practices and budgetary constraints have limited reform in others. The paper concludes with a summary of comparative best practices in enrichment education policy and practice and implications for globally competitive national innovation systems. Full article
Open AccessArticle Effects of Interdependence and Social Interaction-Based Person-Team Fit
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 26-46; doi:10.3390/admsci2010026
Received: 29 November 2011 / Revised: 24 December 2011 / Accepted: 8 January 2012 / Published: 16 January 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The match between employees and their vocations, jobs and organizations has been the focus of the majority of past person-environment fit research. The compatibility between individuals and their work team environments is a more recently recognized, but much less studied, type of [...] Read more.
The match between employees and their vocations, jobs and organizations has been the focus of the majority of past person-environment fit research. The compatibility between individuals and their work team environments is a more recently recognized, but much less studied, type of fit. Person-team fit is conceptualized here along two fundamental dimensions of team environments: interdependence and social interaction. Results from a study involving 209 cross-functional team members indicate that person-team fit has an impact on satisfaction, commitment, trust and performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Regionalizing Immigration, Health and Inequality: Iraqi Refugees in Australia
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 47-62; doi:10.3390/admsci2010047
Received: 1 November 2011 / Revised: 10 January 2012 / Accepted: 10 January 2012 / Published: 16 January 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Humanitarian immigrants and refugees face multiple adjustment tasks and post-settlement support services concentrated in metropolitan areas play an important role. As part of an ongoing commitment, the Australian Government has increasingly supported resettlement in rural and regional areas of the country. Drawing [...] Read more.
Humanitarian immigrants and refugees face multiple adjustment tasks and post-settlement support services concentrated in metropolitan areas play an important role. As part of an ongoing commitment, the Australian Government has increasingly supported resettlement in rural and regional areas of the country. Drawing on the experience of Iraqi migrants in Victoria, Australia, we examine some of the conditions that characterize regional resettlement and raise key questions for public health policy. Structural vulnerabilities and discriminations impact upon physical, mental and social wellbeing, leading to further exclusion, with negative long-term implications. The discussion throws light on the issues that migrants and refugees may encounter in other parts within Australia, but are also germane in many countries and highlight the resulting complexity for policy-making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Health Policy: An International Perspective)
Open AccessArticle Leadership and Knowledge Management in an E-Government Environment
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 63-81; doi:10.3390/admsci2010063
Received: 30 November 2011 / Revised: 18 January 2012 / Accepted: 27 January 2012 / Published: 3 February 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (268 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) is well known to assess quality and business processes in a variety of sectors, including government. In this study, we investigate the relationship between aspects of the MBNQA’s leadership triad and knowledge management in an [...] Read more.
The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) is well known to assess quality and business processes in a variety of sectors, including government. In this study, we investigate the relationship between aspects of the MBNQA’s leadership triad and knowledge management in an e-government context. Specifically, we survey 1,100 employees of a medium-sized city government in the United States to investigate the relationship between leadership triad components, leadership strategic planning, and customer/market focus, with knowledge management. Our results show that these components are significantly related to knowledge management and are important in the delivery of e-government applications to the citizenry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue E-Government: Design, Evaluation and Practice)
Open AccessArticle A Review of Entrepreneurship Education for College Students in China
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 82-98; doi:10.3390/admsci2010082
Received: 10 January 2012 / Revised: 3 February 2012 / Accepted: 21 February 2012 / Published: 1 March 2012
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Abstract
Partly as a result of the rapid growth in Chinese higher education, graduate placement has become a critical issue facing colleges and universties. In response, one of the policy initiatives adopted by the Chinese government is for higher education institutions to put [...] Read more.
Partly as a result of the rapid growth in Chinese higher education, graduate placement has become a critical issue facing colleges and universties. In response, one of the policy initiatives adopted by the Chinese government is for higher education institutions to put an emphasis on entrepreneurship education. In 2002, the Ministry of Education launched a pilot program on carrying out entrepreneurship education in nine prestigious higher education institutions in China. Since then, many colleges and universities have adopted this innovation in education. This study attempts to examine entrepreneurship education as an innovative solution to the challenges facing higher education in China. It first introduces the background for promoting entrepreneurship education in China, analyzes the entrepreneurship education programs and activities in three selected universities, assesses the state of entrepreneurship education both from a student perspective and also through a comparison with developments in the United States, and concludes with recommendations for further developments in entrepreneurship education in China’s colleges and universities. Full article
Open AccessArticle Global Responses to Chronic Diseases: What Lessons Can Political Science Offer?
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 120-134; doi:10.3390/admsci2010120
Received: 23 January 2012 / Revised: 6 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 March 2012 / Published: 20 March 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (244 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Designing and adopting a global response to address the rise of chronic diseases in both the industrial and developing world requires policymakers to engage in global health diplomacy. In the context of the recent United Nations’ High-Level Summit on Non-Communicable Diseases, the [...] Read more.
Designing and adopting a global response to address the rise of chronic diseases in both the industrial and developing world requires policymakers to engage in global health diplomacy. In the context of the recent United Nations’ High-Level Summit on Non-Communicable Diseases, the paper first reviews the rationale for collective action at the global level to address the rise of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), given the perceived limited cross-border dimensions of NCDs. Secondly, based on the social sciences literature studying policymaking at the domestic and international level, this article highlights recommendations on how to engage during the main phases of the policy process: agenda-setting, policy development and adoption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Health Policy: An International Perspective)

Other

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Open AccessEssay Performing Leadership: Observations from the World of Music
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 99-119; doi:10.3390/admsci2010099
Received: 12 January 2012 / Revised: 1 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 March 2012 / Published: 20 March 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores leadership as an emergent social process. We begin by discussing and contesting the tradition privileging linear management processes, and offer as a counterpoint accounts of distributed leadership out of which our focus on leadership as a plural process grows. [...] Read more.
This paper explores leadership as an emergent social process. We begin by discussing and contesting the tradition privileging linear management processes, and offer as a counterpoint accounts of distributed leadership out of which our focus on leadership as a plural process grows. Our concept of leadership as a plural process is enriched by an inquiry into musical ensembles with formal leaders as well as those which are leaderless that find ways of moving collectively towards shared goals. The specific issues that we explore are: personal preparation, expressing readiness to begin, establishing a way of operating, and dealing with unexpected problems as they arise. We conclude by speculating about how these elements could inform our understanding of how leadership arises from teams beyond the musical world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)

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