Special Issue "Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations"

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A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 November 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Barry Z. Posner

Leavey School of Business; Santa Clara University; 500 El Camino Real Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: leadership; human resources management; organizational theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Effective leaders understand that “You can't do it alone.” This special issue provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between leaders and their constituents, and understand how leaders get people to collaborate and struggle together for mutual aspirations within the context of a group or team.  Some of the issues to be investigated include:  How is leadership effectively shared and distributed in high-performing teams?  What does leadership look like within teams of people working across virtual workplaces?

What factors build or hinder the development of trust and respect between leaders and their teams and their members?  What are the mechanisms for leaders effectively sharing power, discretion and latitude with team members?

How do leaders share information and resources without abdicating responsibility?

What factors influence alignment between the aims of leaders and the aspirations of their teams? What unique cross-cultural issues impact the relationship between leaders and their teams?  Special attention should be paid to the interaction of leaders (leadership) and teams rather than simply focusing simply on leaders and/or teamwork.

Prof. Dr. Barry Z. Posner
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • leadership
  • teamwork
  • cooperation
  • empowerment
  • virtual Teams
  • delegation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Descriptive Account of an Inter-Professional Collaborative Leadership Project
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(3), 373-399; doi:10.3390/admsci4030373
Received: 9 July 2014 / Revised: 9 September 2014 / Accepted: 9 September 2014 / Published: 17 September 2014
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Abstract
A collaborative project between an academic healthcare faculty and a professional development director resulted in the design, delivery and evaluation of an inter-professional collaborative leadership workshop with ongoing leadership development activities. The workshop attendees were five inter-professional teams from one large, urban cancer
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A collaborative project between an academic healthcare faculty and a professional development director resulted in the design, delivery and evaluation of an inter-professional collaborative leadership workshop with ongoing leadership development activities. The workshop attendees were five inter-professional teams from one large, urban cancer care center in Taipei, Taiwan. The workshop included didactic instruction complemented with team discussions and interactive exercises. Continued practice was encouraged, such as appreciative inquiry exercises and rotated team leadership. Evaluation involved the use of a cross-culturally validated collaborative practice tool and follow-up interviews and focus groups. Although the formal workshop was a 1-day session, continued organizational support and systematic approaches to collaborative leadership practice in clinical settings were necessary components for transfer of learning from the workshop to real life. This paper will include an overview of the foundational leadership concepts covered in the workshop. The instructional strategies, evaluation methods and outcomes will be discussed. The limitations and strengths of this collaborative leadership project will be provided, as well as future plans for a collaborative leadership development program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)
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Open AccessArticle Catching Leaders’ Mood: Contagion Effects in Teams
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(3), 203-220; doi:10.3390/admsci2030203
Received: 2 June 2012 / Revised: 30 July 2012 / Accepted: 30 July 2012 / Published: 29 August 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (289 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Much of the behavior at work takes place within teams. Leaders of teams experience different feelings that, in turn, can have an impact on how team members feel and perform. This study examined the effects of leaders’ mood on individual team members’ mood,
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Much of the behavior at work takes place within teams. Leaders of teams experience different feelings that, in turn, can have an impact on how team members feel and perform. This study examined the effects of leaders’ mood on individual team members’ mood, group affective tone, and team outcomes (actual team performance, potency, and goal commitment) in a laboratory study, with a sample of 63 students working in three-person teams. Furthermore, the study investigated the mediating role of group affective tone in the leaders’ mood–team outcomes relationship. Results demonstrated that leaders influence team members’ individual mood, group affective tone, actual team performance, and potency. Moreover, group affective tone mediated the relationship between team leaders’ mood and potency. Taken together, the findings suggest that in order to enhance subordinates’ work experience and to attain desired outcomes, leaders should be aware of their mood and its potential effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Effects of Interdependence and Social Interaction-Based Person-Team Fit
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 26-46; doi:10.3390/admsci2010026
Received: 29 November 2011 / Revised: 24 December 2011 / Accepted: 8 January 2012 / Published: 16 January 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The match between employees and their vocations, jobs and organizations has been the focus of the majority of past person-environment fit research. The compatibility between individuals and their work team environments is a more recently recognized, but much less studied, type of fit.
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The match between employees and their vocations, jobs and organizations has been the focus of the majority of past person-environment fit research. The compatibility between individuals and their work team environments is a more recently recognized, but much less studied, type of fit. Person-team fit is conceptualized here along two fundamental dimensions of team environments: interdependence and social interaction. Results from a study involving 209 cross-functional team members indicate that person-team fit has an impact on satisfaction, commitment, trust and performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Creating High Reliability Teams in Healthcare through In situ Simulation Training
Adm. Sci. 2011, 1(1), 14-31; doi:10.3390/admsci1010014
Received: 4 May 2011 / Revised: 20 June 2011 / Accepted: 4 July 2011 / Published: 19 July 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The importance of teamwork on patient safety in healthcare has been well established. However, the theory and research of healthcare teams are seriously lacking in clinical application. While conventional team theory assumes that teams are stable and leadership is constant, a growing body
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The importance of teamwork on patient safety in healthcare has been well established. However, the theory and research of healthcare teams are seriously lacking in clinical application. While conventional team theory assumes that teams are stable and leadership is constant, a growing body of evidence indicates that most healthcare teams are unstable and lack constant leadership. For healthcare organizations to reduce error and ensure patient safety, the true nature of healthcare teams must be better understood. This study presents a taxonomy of healthcare teams and the determinants of high reliability in healthcare teams based on a series of studies undertaken over a five-year period (2005–2010). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Intra-Group Conflict and Teamwork Quality: The Moderating Role of Leadership Styles
Adm. Sci. 2011, 1(1), 3-13; doi:10.3390/admsci1010003
Received: 12 February 2011 / Revised: 18 March 2011 / Accepted: 23 March 2011 / Published: 29 March 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (209 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The study examines the extent to which task and relations oriented leadership moderate the impact of task and relationship conflict on teamwork quality. In a sample of 37 teams, the study shows that relationship oriented leadership is beneficial for dealing with relationship conflict,
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The study examines the extent to which task and relations oriented leadership moderate the impact of task and relationship conflict on teamwork quality. In a sample of 37 teams, the study shows that relationship oriented leadership is beneficial for dealing with relationship conflict, but it does not have the expected positive interaction effect with task conflict. The main practical implication of the results is that in order to mitigate the negative effects of intra-group conflict on teamwork quality the leadership style should fit the type of disagreement (task versus relational) predominantly experienced by the teams. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEssay Performing Leadership: Observations from the World of Music
Adm. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 99-119; doi:10.3390/admsci2010099
Received: 12 January 2012 / Revised: 1 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 March 2012 / Published: 20 March 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper explores leadership as an emergent social process. We begin by discussing and contesting the tradition privileging linear management processes, and offer as a counterpoint accounts of distributed leadership out of which our focus on leadership as a plural process grows. Our
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This paper explores leadership as an emergent social process. We begin by discussing and contesting the tradition privileging linear management processes, and offer as a counterpoint accounts of distributed leadership out of which our focus on leadership as a plural process grows. Our concept of leadership as a plural process is enriched by an inquiry into musical ensembles with formal leaders as well as those which are leaderless that find ways of moving collectively towards shared goals. The specific issues that we explore are: personal preparation, expressing readiness to begin, establishing a way of operating, and dealing with unexpected problems as they arise. We conclude by speculating about how these elements could inform our understanding of how leadership arises from teams beyond the musical world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teamwork and Leadership in Organizations)

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