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Genes, Volume 9, Issue 3 (March 2018)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) When Egyptologists at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, could not figure out the sex of a mummified [...] Read more.
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Open AccessArticle Comparative Analysis of Surface Layer Glycoproteins and Genes Involved in Protein Glycosylation in the Genus Haloferax
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
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Abstract
Within the Haloferax genus, both the surface (S)-layer protein, and the glycans that can decorate it, vary between species, which can potentially result in many different surface types, analogous to bacterial serotypes. This variation may mediate phenotypes, such as sensitivity to different viruses
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Within the Haloferax genus, both the surface (S)-layer protein, and the glycans that can decorate it, vary between species, which can potentially result in many different surface types, analogous to bacterial serotypes. This variation may mediate phenotypes, such as sensitivity to different viruses and mating preferences. Here, we describe S-layer glycoproteins found in multiple Haloferax strains and perform comparative genomics analyses of major and alternative glycosylation clusters of isolates from two coastal sites. We analyze the phylogeny of individual glycosylation genes and demonstrate that while the major glycosylation cluster tends to be conserved among closely related strains, the alternative cluster is highly variable. Thus, geographically- and genetically-related strains may exhibit diverse surface structures to such an extent that no two isolates present an identical surface profile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Genomics of Extremophiles)
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Open AccessArticle Genomic Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Associated with Clinical Listeriosis and the Food Production Environment in Ireland
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
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Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes is a major human foodborne pathogen that is prevalent in the natural environment and has a high case fatality rate. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis has emerged as a valuable methodology for the classification of L. monocytogenes isolates and the identification
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Listeria monocytogenes is a major human foodborne pathogen that is prevalent in the natural environment and has a high case fatality rate. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) analysis has emerged as a valuable methodology for the classification of L. monocytogenes isolates and the identification of virulence islands that may influence infectivity. In this study, WGS was used to provide an insight into 25 L. monocytogenes isolates from cases of clinical infection in Ireland between 2013 and 2015. Clinical strains were either lineage I (14 isolates) or lineage II (11 isolates), with 12 clonal complexes (CC) represented, of which CC1 (6) and CC101 (4) were the most common. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis demonstrated that clinical isolates from mother–infant pairs (one isolate from the mother and one from the infant) were highly related (3 SNP differences in each) and also identified close similarities between isolates from otherwise distinct cases (1 SNP difference). Clinical strains were positive for common virulence-associated loci and 13 isolates harbour the LIPI-3 locus. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to compare strains to a database of 1300 Irish food and food processing environment isolates and determined that 64% of clinical pulsotypes were previously encountered in the food or food processing environment. Five of the matching food and food processing environment isolates were sequenced and results demonstrated a correlation between pulsotype and genotype. Overall, the work provides insights into the nature of L. monocytogenes strains currently causing clinical disease in Ireland and indicates that similar isolates can be found in the food or food processing environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Genomics of Foodborne Pathogens)
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Open AccessArticle Long Non-Coding RNAs Responsive to Salt and Boron Stress in the Hyper-Arid Lluteño Maize from Atacama Desert
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 2 March 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3561 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, which lack significant protein coding potential and possess critical roles in diverse cellular processes. Long non-coding RNAs have recently been functionally characterized in plant stress–response mechanisms. In the present study,
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Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, which lack significant protein coding potential and possess critical roles in diverse cellular processes. Long non-coding RNAs have recently been functionally characterized in plant stress–response mechanisms. In the present study, we perform a comprehensive identification of lncRNAs in response to combined stress induced by salinity and excess of boron in the Lluteño maize, a tolerant maize landrace from Atacama Desert, Chile. We use deep RNA sequencing to identify a set of 48,345 different lncRNAs, of which 28,012 (58.1%) are conserved with other maize (B73, Mo17 or Palomero), with the remaining 41.9% belonging to potentially Lluteño exclusive lncRNA transcripts. According to B73 maize reference genome sequence, most Lluteño lncRNAs correspond to intergenic transcripts. Interestingly, Lluteño lncRNAs presents an unusual overall higher expression compared to protein coding genes under exposure to stressed conditions. In total, we identified 1710 putatively responsive to the combined stressed conditions of salt and boron exposure. We also identified a set of 848 stress responsive potential trans natural antisense transcripts (trans-NAT) lncRNAs, which seems to be regulating genes associated with regulation of transcription, response to stress, response to abiotic stimulus and participating of the nicotianamine metabolic process. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) experiments were performed in a subset of lncRNAs, validating their existence and expression patterns. Our results suggest that a diverse set of maize lncRNAs from leaves and roots is responsive to combined salt and boron stress, being the first effort to identify lncRNAs from a maize landrace adapted to extreme conditions such as the Atacama Desert. The information generated is a starting point to understand the genomic adaptabilities suffered by this maize to surpass this extremely stressed environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessArticle Yak IGF2 Promotes Fibroblast Proliferation Via Suppression of IGF1R and PI3KCG Expression
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 3 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
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Abstract
Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) recapitulates many of the activities of insulin and promotes differentiation of myoblasts and osteoblasts, which likely contribute to genetic variations of growth potential. However, little is known about the functions and signaling properties of IGF2 variants in yaks.
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Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) recapitulates many of the activities of insulin and promotes differentiation of myoblasts and osteoblasts, which likely contribute to genetic variations of growth potential. However, little is known about the functions and signaling properties of IGF2 variants in yaks. The over-expression vector and knockdown sequence of yak IGF2 were transfected into yak fibroblasts, and the effects were detected by a series of assays. IGF2 expression in yak muscle tissues was significantly lower than that of other tissues. In yak fibroblasts, the up-regulated expression of IGF2 inhibits expression of IGF1 and insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) and significantly up-regulates expression of IGF1R. Inhibition of IGF2 expression caused the up-regulates expression of IGF1, IGF1R and IGF2R. Both over-expression and knockdown of IGF2 resulted in up-regulation of threonine protein kinase 1 (Akt1) expression and down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, catalytic subunit gamma (PIK3CG). Cell cycle and cell proliferation assays revealed that over-expression of IGF2 enhanced the DNA synthesis phase and promoted yak fibroblasts proliferation. Conversely, knockdown of IGF2 decreased DNA synthesis and inhibited proliferation. These results suggested that IGF2 was negatively correlated with IGF1R and PIK3CG and demonstrated an association with the IGFs-PI3K-Akt (IGFs-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase- threonine protein kinase) pathway in cell proliferation and provided evidence supporting the functional role of IGF2 for use in improving the production performance of yaks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessArticle Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Cytokinin Oxidase/Dehydrogenase (CKX) Genes Reveal Likely Roles in Pod Development and Stress Responses in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)
Received: 7 February 2018 / Revised: 10 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
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Abstract
Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenases (CKXs) play a critical role in the irreversible degradation of cytokinins, thereby regulating plant growth and development. Brassica napus is one of the most widely cultivated oilseed crops worldwide. With the completion of whole-genome sequencing of B. napus, genome-wide identification
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Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenases (CKXs) play a critical role in the irreversible degradation of cytokinins, thereby regulating plant growth and development. Brassica napus is one of the most widely cultivated oilseed crops worldwide. With the completion of whole-genome sequencing of B. napus, genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the BnCKX gene family has become technically feasible. In this study, we identified 23 BnCKX genes and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, conserved motifs, protein subcellular localizations, and other properties. We also analyzed the expression of the 23 BnCKX genes in the B. napus cultivar Zhong Shuang 11 (‘ZS11’) by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), revealing their diverse expression patterns. We selected four BnCKX genes based on the results of RNA-sequencing and qRT-PCR and compared their expression in cultivated varieties with extremely long versus short siliques. The expression levels of BnCKX5-1, 5-2, 6-1, and 7-1 significantly differed between the two lines and changed during pod development, suggesting they might play roles in determining silique length and in pod development. Finally, we investigated the effects of treatment with the synthetic cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) and the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on the expression of the four selected BnCKX genes. Our results suggest that regulating BnCKX expression is a promising way to enhance the harvest index and stress resistance in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessReview Dietary Alteration of the Gut Microbiome and Its Impact on Weight and Fat Mass: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Received: 5 December 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4322 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Dietary alteration of the gut microbiome is an important target in the treatment of obesity. Animal and human studies have shown bidirectional weight modulation based on the probiotic formulation used. In this study, we systematically reviewed the literature and performed a meta-analysis to
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Dietary alteration of the gut microbiome is an important target in the treatment of obesity. Animal and human studies have shown bidirectional weight modulation based on the probiotic formulation used. In this study, we systematically reviewed the literature and performed a meta-analysis to assess the impact of prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics on body weight, body mass index (BMI) and fat mass in adult human subjects. We searched Medline (PubMed), Embase, the Cochrane Library and the Web of Science to identify 4721 articles, of which 41 were subjected to full-text screening, yielding 21 included studies with 33 study arms. Probiotic use was associated with significant decreases in BMI, weight and fat mass. Studies of subjects consuming prebiotics demonstrated a significant reduction in body weight, whereas synbiotics did not show an effect. Overall, when the utilization of gut microbiome-modulating dietary agents (prebiotic/probiotic/synbiotic) was compared to placebo, there were significant decreases in BMI, weight and fat mass. In summary, dietary agents for the modulation of the gut microbiome are essential tools in the treatment of obesity and can lead to significant decreases in BMI, weight and fat mass. Further studies are needed to identify the ideal dose and duration of supplementation and to assess the durability of this effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetes, Obesity and the Gut Microbiome)
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Open AccessArticle Evolutionary Mechanisms of Varying Chromosome Numbers in the Radiation of Erebia Butterflies
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 14 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
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Abstract
The evolution of intrinsic barriers to gene flow is a crucial step in the process of speciation. Chromosomal changes caused by fusion and fission events are one such barrier and are common in several groups of Lepidoptera. However, it remains unclear if and
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The evolution of intrinsic barriers to gene flow is a crucial step in the process of speciation. Chromosomal changes caused by fusion and fission events are one such barrier and are common in several groups of Lepidoptera. However, it remains unclear if and how chromosomal changes have contributed to speciation in this group. I tested for a phylogenetic signal of varying chromosome numbers in Erebia butterflies by combining existing sequence data with karyological information. I also compared different models of trait evolution in order to infer the underlying evolutionary mechanisms. Overall, I found significant phylogenetic signals that are consistent with non-neutral trait evolution only when parts of the mitochondrial genome were included, suggesting cytonuclear discordances. The adaptive evolutionary model tested in this study consistently outperformed the neutral model of trait evolution. Taken together, these results suggest that, unlike other Lepidoptera groups, changes in chromosome numbers may have played a role in the diversification of Erebia butterflies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Evolutionary Genetics of Reproductive Isolation)
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Open AccessReview Targeting Mitochondria to Counteract Age-Related Cellular Dysfunction
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 2 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
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Abstract
Senescence is related to the loss of cellular homeostasis and functions, which leads to a progressive decline in physiological ability and to aging-associated diseases. Since mitochondria are essential to energy supply, cell differentiation, cell cycle control, intracellular signaling and Ca2+ sequestration, fine-tuning
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Senescence is related to the loss of cellular homeostasis and functions, which leads to a progressive decline in physiological ability and to aging-associated diseases. Since mitochondria are essential to energy supply, cell differentiation, cell cycle control, intracellular signaling and Ca2+ sequestration, fine-tuning mitochondrial activity appropriately, is a tightrope walk during aging. For instance, the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) ensures a supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but is also the main source of potentially harmful levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, mitochondrial function is strongly linked to mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial shape, which undergo various alterations during aging. Since mitochondria play such a critical role in an organism’s process of aging, they also offer promising targets for manipulation of senescent cellular functions. Accordingly, interventions delaying the onset of age-associated disorders involve the manipulation of mitochondrial function, including caloric restriction (CR) or exercise, as well as drugs, such as metformin, aspirin, and polyphenols. In this review, we discuss mitochondria’s role in and impact on cellular aging and their potential to serve as a target for therapeutic interventions against age-related cellular dysfunction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mitochondria and Aging)
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Open AccessArticle Distinct Roles of Velvet Complex in the Development, Stress Tolerance, and Secondary Metabolism in Pestalotiopsis microspora, a Taxol Producer
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 7 March 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
The velvet family proteins have been shown to play critical roles in fungal secondary metabolism and development. However, variations of the roles have been observed in different fungi. We report here the observation on the role of three velvet complex components VeA, VelB,
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The velvet family proteins have been shown to play critical roles in fungal secondary metabolism and development. However, variations of the roles have been observed in different fungi. We report here the observation on the role of three velvet complex components VeA, VelB, and LaeA in Pestalotiopsis microspora, a formerly reported taxol-producing fungus. Deletion of individual members led to the retardation of vegetative growth and sporulation and pigmentation, suggesting critical roles in these processes. The mutant strain △velB appeared hypersensitive to osmotic stress and the dye Congo red, whereas △veA and △laeA were little affected by the pressures, suggesting only velB was required for the integrity of the cell wall. Importantly, we found that the genes played distinct roles in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in P. microspora. For instance, the production of pestalotiollide B, a previously characterized polyketide, required velB and laeA. In contrast, the veA gene appeared to inhibit the pestalotiollide B (PB) role in its biosynthesis. This study suggests that the three components of the velvet complex are important global regulators, but with distinct roles in hyphal growth, asexual production, and secondary metabolism in P. microspora. This work provides information for further understanding the biosynthesis of secondary metabolism in the fungus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessReview Phylogeny and Phylogeography of Rhizobial Symbionts Nodulating Legumes of the Tribe Genisteae
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 2 March 2018 / Accepted: 5 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The legume tribe Genisteae comprises 618, predominantly temperate species, showing an amphi-Atlantic distribution that was caused by several long-distance dispersal events. Seven out of the 16 authenticated rhizobial genera can nodulate particular Genisteae species. Bradyrhizobium predominates among rhizobia nodulating Genisteae legumes. Bradyrhizobium strains
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The legume tribe Genisteae comprises 618, predominantly temperate species, showing an amphi-Atlantic distribution that was caused by several long-distance dispersal events. Seven out of the 16 authenticated rhizobial genera can nodulate particular Genisteae species. Bradyrhizobium predominates among rhizobia nodulating Genisteae legumes. Bradyrhizobium strains that infect Genisteae species belong to both the Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii superclades. In symbiotic gene phylogenies, Genisteae bradyrhizobia are scattered among several distinct clades, comprising strains that originate from phylogenetically distant legumes. This indicates that the capacity for nodulation of Genisteae spp. has evolved independently in various symbiotic gene clades, and that it has not been a long-multi-step process. The exception is Bradyrhizobium Clade II, which unlike other clades comprises strains that are specialized in nodulation of Genisteae, but also Loteae spp. Presumably, Clade II represents an example of long-lasting co-evolution of bradyrhizobial symbionts with their legume hosts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Genomics of the Rhizobium-Legume Symbiosis)
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Open AccessArticle VdPLP, A Patatin-Like Phospholipase in Verticillium dahliae, Is Involved in Cell Wall Integrity and Required for Pathogenicity
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 4 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
The soil-borne ascomycete fungus Verticillium dahliae causes vascular wilt disease and can seriously diminish the yield and quality of important crops. Functional analysis of growth- and pathogenicity-related genes is essential for revealing the pathogenic molecular mechanism of V. dahliae. Phospholipase is an
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The soil-borne ascomycete fungus Verticillium dahliae causes vascular wilt disease and can seriously diminish the yield and quality of important crops. Functional analysis of growth- and pathogenicity-related genes is essential for revealing the pathogenic molecular mechanism of V. dahliae. Phospholipase is an important virulence factor in fungi that hydrolyzes phospholipids into fatty acid and other lipophilic substances and is involved in hyphal development. Thus far, only a few V. dahliae phospholipases have been identified, and their involvement in V. dahliae development and pathogenicity remains unknown. In this study, the function of the patatin-like phospholipase gene in V. dahliae (VdPLP, VDAG_00942) is characterized by generating gene knockout and complementary mutants. Vegetative growth and conidiation of VdPLP deletion mutants (ΔVdPLP) were significantly reduced compared with wild type and complementary strains, but more microsclerotia formed. The ΔVdPLP mutants were very sensitive to the cell-wall-perturbing agents: calcofluor white (CFW) and Congo red (CR). The transcriptional level of genes related to the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway and chitin synthesis were downregulated, suggesting that VdPLP has a pivotal role in the CWI pathway and chitin synthesis in V. dahliae. ΔVdPLP strains were distinctly impaired in in their virulence and ability to colonize Nicotiana benthamiana roots. Our results demonstrate that VdPLP regulates hyphal growth and conidial production and is involved in stabilizing the cell wall, thus mediating the pathogenicity of V. dahliae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessReview Alternative Splicing in the Hippo Pathway—Implications for Disease and Potential Therapeutic Targets
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
Alternative splicing is a well-studied gene regulatory mechanism that produces biological diversity by allowing the production of multiple protein isoforms from a single gene. An involvement of alternative splicing in the key biological signalling Hippo pathway is emerging and offers new therapeutic avenues.
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Alternative splicing is a well-studied gene regulatory mechanism that produces biological diversity by allowing the production of multiple protein isoforms from a single gene. An involvement of alternative splicing in the key biological signalling Hippo pathway is emerging and offers new therapeutic avenues. This review discusses examples of alternative splicing in the Hippo pathway, how deregulation of these processes may contribute to disease and whether these processes offer new potential therapeutic targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aberrant Pre-mRNA Splicing in Disease)
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Open AccessArticle Caenorhabditis elegans BRICHOS Domain–Containing Protein C09F5.1 Maintains Thermotolerance and Decreases Cytotoxicity of Aβ42 by Activating the UPR
Received: 11 December 2017 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
Caenorhabditis elegans C09F5.1 is a nematode-specific gene that encodes a type II transmembrane protein containing the BRICHOS domain. The gene was isolated as a heat-sensitive mutant, but the function of the protein remained unclear. We examined the expression pattern and subcellular localization of
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Caenorhabditis elegans C09F5.1 is a nematode-specific gene that encodes a type II transmembrane protein containing the BRICHOS domain. The gene was isolated as a heat-sensitive mutant, but the function of the protein remained unclear. We examined the expression pattern and subcellular localization of C09F5.1 as well as its roles in thermotolerance and chaperone function. Expression of C09F5.1 under heat shock conditions was induced in a heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1)–dependent manner. However, under normal growth conditions, most cells types exposed to mechanical stimuli expressed C09F5.1. Knockdown of C09F5.1 expression or deletion of the N-terminal domain decreased thermotolerance. The BRICHOS domain of C09F5.1 did not exhibit chaperone function unlike those of other proteins containing this domain, but the domain was essential for the proper subcellular localization of the protein. Intact C09F5.1 was localized to the Golgi body, but the N-terminal domain of C09F5.1 (C09F5.1-NTD) was retained in the ER. C09F5.1-NTD delayed paralysis by beta-amyloid (1-42) protein (Aβ42) in Alzheimer’s disease model worms (CL4176) and activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) by interacting with Aβ42. An intrinsically disordered region (IDR) located at the N-terminus of C09F5.1 may be responsible for the chaperone function of C09F5.1-NTD. Taken together, the data suggest that C09F5.1 triggers the UPR by interacting with abnormal proteins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Genetics and Genomics)
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Open AccessReview CD99: A Cell Surface Protein with an Oncojanus Role in Tumors
Received: 25 January 2018 / Revised: 2 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
The cell surface molecule CD99 has gained interest because of its involvement in regulating cell differentiation and adhesion/migration of immune and tumor cells. However, the molecule plays an intriguing and dual role in different cell types. In particular, it acts as a requirement
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The cell surface molecule CD99 has gained interest because of its involvement in regulating cell differentiation and adhesion/migration of immune and tumor cells. However, the molecule plays an intriguing and dual role in different cell types. In particular, it acts as a requirement for cell malignancy or as an oncosuppressor in tumors. In addition, the gene encodes for two different isoforms, which also act in opposition inside the same cell. This review highlights key studies focusing on the dual role of CD99 and its isoforms and discusses major critical issues, challenges, and strategies for overcoming those challenges. The review specifically underscores the properties that make the molecule an attractive therapeutic target and identifies new relationships and areas of study that may be exploited. The elucidation of the spatial and temporal control of the expression of CD99 in normal and tumor cells is required to obtain a full appreciation of this molecule and its signaling. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Novel Hybrid Sequence-Based Model for Identifying Anticancer Peptides
Received: 24 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 27 February 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3848 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cancer is a serious health issue worldwide. Traditional treatment methods focus on killing cancer cells by using anticancer drugs or radiation therapy, but the cost of these methods is quite high, and in addition there are side effects. With the discovery of anticancer
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Cancer is a serious health issue worldwide. Traditional treatment methods focus on killing cancer cells by using anticancer drugs or radiation therapy, but the cost of these methods is quite high, and in addition there are side effects. With the discovery of anticancer peptides, great progress has been made in cancer treatment. For the purpose of prompting the application of anticancer peptides in cancer treatment, it is necessary to use computational methods to identify anticancer peptides (ACPs). In this paper, we propose a sequence-based model for identifying ACPs (SAP). In our proposed SAP, the peptide is represented by 400D features or 400D features with g-gap dipeptide features, and then the unrelated features are pruned using the maximum relevance-maximum distance method. The experimental results demonstrate that our model performs better than some existing methods. Furthermore, our model has also been extended to other classifiers, and the performance is stable compared with some state-of-the-art works. Full article
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