Next Issue
Previous Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Nutrients, Volume 2, Issue 6 (June 2010), Pages 572-651

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Are New Generations of Female College-Student Populations Meeting Calcium Requirements: Comparison of American and Croatian Female Students
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 599-610; doi:10.3390/nu2060599
Received: 26 April 2010 / Revised: 27 May 2010 / Accepted: 28 May 2010 / Published: 28 May 2010
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (736 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We compared calcium (Ca) sources and intake, as well as multivitamin/mineral supplement use between female students with nutrition/health background and those from general-student-populations. 314 participants 18–37 y, including 57 African-Americans and 54 Caucasian-Americans recruited from Nutrition and/or other Health Sciences departments (NHS), [...] Read more.
We compared calcium (Ca) sources and intake, as well as multivitamin/mineral supplement use between female students with nutrition/health background and those from general-student-populations. 314 participants 18–37 y, including 57 African-Americans and 54 Caucasian-Americans recruited from Nutrition and/or other Health Sciences departments (NHS), and 100 African-American and 103 Croatian women representing general-student-population (GSP), completed food frequency questionnaire assessing their usual Ca intake and supplement use. NHS populations met recommendations and consumed significantly more Ca, particularly from dairy sources, and were more likely to take supplements than GSP groups, suggesting that health education may influence Ca intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Calcium)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Long-Chain Omega-3 Oils–An Update on Sustainable Sources
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 572-585; doi:10.3390/nu2060572
Received: 1 March 2010 / Revised: 30 April 2010 / Accepted: 20 May 2010 / Published: 26 May 2010
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (290 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Seafood is currently the best and generally a safe source of long-chain (LC, (≥C20) omega-3 oils amongst the common food groups. LC omega-3 oils are also obtained in lower amounts per serve from red meat, egg and selected other foods. [...] Read more.
Seafood is currently the best and generally a safe source of long-chain (LC, (≥C20) omega-3 oils amongst the common food groups. LC omega-3 oils are also obtained in lower amounts per serve from red meat, egg and selected other foods. As global population increases the opportunities to increase seafood harvest are limited, therefore new alternate sources are required. Emerging sources include microalgae and under-utilized resources such as Southern Ocean krill. Prospects for new land plant sources of these unique and health-benefiting oils are also particularly promising, offering hope for alternate and sustainable supplies of these key oils, with resulting health, social, economic and environmental benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Omega-3 Update)
Open AccessReview Postprandial Energy Metabolism in the Regulation of Body Weight: Is there a Mechanistic Role for Dietary Calcium?
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 586-598; doi:10.3390/nu2060586
Received: 16 April 2010 / Revised: 26 May 2010 / Accepted: 27 May 2010 / Published: 28 May 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (600 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. [...] Read more.
There has been much interest in the mechanisms by which calcium may attenuate weight gain or accelerate body fat loss. This review focuses on postprandial energy metabolism and indicates that dietary calcium increases whole body fat oxidation after single and multiple meals. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for a greater diet induced thermogenesis, an increased lipolysis or suppression of key lipogenic enzyme systems. There is however convincing evidence that higher calcium intakes promote a modest energy loss through increased fecal fat excretion. Overall, there is a role for dietary calcium in human energy metabolism. Future studies need to define threshold intakes for metabolic and gastrointestinal outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Calcium)
Figures

Open AccessReview The Role of Functional Foods, Nutraceuticals, and Food Supplements in Intestinal Health
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 611-625; doi:10.3390/nu2060611
Received: 6 May 2010 / Revised: 21 May 2010 / Accepted: 30 May 2010 / Published: 1 June 2010
Cited by 31 | PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
New eating habits, actual trends in production and consumption have a health, environmental and social impact. The European Union is fighting diseases characteristic of a modern age, such as obesity, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, allergies and dental problems. Developed countries are also faced [...] Read more.
New eating habits, actual trends in production and consumption have a health, environmental and social impact. The European Union is fighting diseases characteristic of a modern age, such as obesity, osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, allergies and dental problems. Developed countries are also faced with problems relating to aging populations, high energy foods, and unbalanced diets. The potential of nutraceuticals/functional foods/food supplements in mitigating health problems, especially in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, is discussed. Certain members of gut microflora (e.g., probiotic/protective strains) play a role in the host health due to its involvement in nutritional, immunologic and physiological functions. The potential mechanisms by which nutraceuticals/functional foods/food supplements may alter a host’s health are also highlighted in this paper. The establishment of novel functional cell models of the GI and analytical tools that allow tests in controlled experiments are highly desired for gut research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)
Open AccessReview Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression
Nutrients 2010, 2(6), 626-651; doi:10.3390/nu2060626
Received: 29 April 2010 / Revised: 18 May 2010 / Accepted: 25 May 2010 / Published: 2 June 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions [...] Read more.
Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics has considerable potential, but the evidence needs to be further substantiated. Vitamin A, iron, and zinc have been associated with adverse effects and caution is warranted for their use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food and Function 2009)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Nutrients Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
nutrients@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Nutrients
Back to Top