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Future Internet, Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2012), Pages 362-617

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Introduction to the Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet Special Issue
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 545-550; doi:10.3390/fi4020545
Received: 18 May 2012 / Accepted: 21 May 2012 / Published: 23 May 2012
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Abstract
The social transformations brought about by the mobile internet are extensive. In discussing the broad range of these transformations—positioned as a shift from personal computing to pervasive computing—this editorial elaborates on the key contributions addressed by the articles in this special issue [...] Read more.
The social transformations brought about by the mobile internet are extensive. In discussing the broad range of these transformations—positioned as a shift from personal computing to pervasive computing—this editorial elaborates on the key contributions addressed by the articles in this special issue of Future Internet. These articles touch on topics such as the digital divide, the role of the mobile internet in revolutions like the Arab Spring and the Occupy Wall Street movement, the development of site-specific and context-aware news, the incorporation of the internet into existing technologies like the automobile, and the utilization of the mobile internet to transform everyday spaces into game spaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Collaboration between Professionals: The Use of Videoconferencing for Delivering E-Health
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 362-371; doi:10.3390/fi4020362
Received: 15 March 2012 / Revised: 29 March 2012 / Accepted: 30 March 2012 / Published: 2 April 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (141 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article explores the ways in which collaboration between professionals using videoconferencing affects the e-health delivered to patients. In Norway, general practitioners (GPs) and specialists routinely hold videoconferences. Observations of 42 VC meetings, each lasting from 5 to 40 min, were analysed [...] Read more.
This article explores the ways in which collaboration between professionals using videoconferencing affects the e-health delivered to patients. In Norway, general practitioners (GPs) and specialists routinely hold videoconferences. Observations of 42 VC meetings, each lasting from 5 to 40 min, were analysed in terms of the interactions. In addition, five semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted, each lasting from 20 to 70 minutes. Statements were selected to illustrate the content of the interactions and how collaborative work affects the delivery of healthcare. Successful collaborative work provides practitioners with a new way of thinking: exchanging information and knowledge between levels of care in order to provide the best treatment for patients locally. The regularity makes the collaborative work a two-way achievement. GPs receive decision support and second opinions, and specialists receive information and opportunities to follow up. How the professionals manage their work (i.e., collaborating) may benefit their patients. The regular use of videoconferencing will furnish professionals with enhanced resources for the meeting of patients’ demands in the future. Regularly informing one another and exchanging knowledge, benefits the professionals by providing increased certainty with regard to their medical decisions, and it benefits the patients because they will feel satisfied with the competence of the specialists where they live. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future e-Health)
Open AccessArticle A Semantically Automated Protocol Adapter for Mapping SOAP Web Services to RESTful HTTP Format to Enable the Web Infrastructure, Enhance Web Service Interoperability and Ease Web Service Migration
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 372-395; doi:10.3390/fi4020372
Received: 11 January 2012 / Revised: 20 March 2012 / Accepted: 31 March 2012 / Published: 11 April 2012
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Abstract
Semantic Web Services (SWS) are Web Service (WS) descriptions augmented with semantic information. SWS enable intelligent reasoning and automation in areas such as service discovery, composition, mediation, ranking and invocation. This paper applies SWS to a previous protocol adapter which, operating within [...] Read more.
Semantic Web Services (SWS) are Web Service (WS) descriptions augmented with semantic information. SWS enable intelligent reasoning and automation in areas such as service discovery, composition, mediation, ranking and invocation. This paper applies SWS to a previous protocol adapter which, operating within clearly defined constraints, maps SOAP Web Services to RESTful HTTP format. However, in the previous adapter, the configuration element is manual and the latency implications are locally based. This paper applies SWS technologies to automate the configuration element and the latency tests are conducted in a more realistic Internet based setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ITA 11)
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Open AccessArticle Bloggers’ Community Characteristics and Influence within Greek Political Blogosphere
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 396-412; doi:10.3390/fi4020396
Received: 27 February 2012 / Revised: 9 April 2012 / Accepted: 12 April 2012 / Published: 19 April 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (342 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper investigates the properties of central or core political blogs. They can be located as clusters of blogs whose members have many incoming links. Other blogs form clouds around them in the sense that they link the core blogs. A case [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the properties of central or core political blogs. They can be located as clusters of blogs whose members have many incoming links. Other blogs form clouds around them in the sense that they link the core blogs. A case study records Greek political blogs and their incoming links reported through their blogrolls. The adjacency matrix from the blogs’ social network is analyzed and clusters are located. Three of them, those with the larger numbers of incoming links, may be considered to be central. Next, four measures of influence are used to test the influence of the central blogs. The findings suggest that there are many kinds of central blogs, influential and non-influential, and high influence does not always involve high hyperlinking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Government 2.0)
Open AccessArticle Principles of Eliminating Access Control Lists within a Domain
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 413-429; doi:10.3390/fi4020413
Received: 27 December 2011 / Revised: 20 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 April 2012 / Published: 19 April 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (571 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The infrastructure of large networks is broken down into areas that have a common security policy called a domain. Security within a domain is commonly implemented at all nodes. However this can have a negative effect on performance since it introduces a [...] Read more.
The infrastructure of large networks is broken down into areas that have a common security policy called a domain. Security within a domain is commonly implemented at all nodes. However this can have a negative effect on performance since it introduces a delay associated with packet filtering. When Access Control Lists (ACLs) are used within a router for this purpose then a significant overhead is introduced associated with this process. It is likely that identical checks are made at multiple points within a domain prior to a packet reaching its destination. Therefore by eliminating ACLs within a domain by modifying the ingress/egress points with equivalent functionality an improvement in the overall performance can be obtained. This paper considers the effect of the delays when using router operating systems offering different levels of functionality. It considers factors which contribute to the delay particularly due to ACLs and by using theoretical principles modified by practical calculation a model is created. Additionally this paper provides an example of an optimized solution which reduces the delay through network routers by distributing the security rules to the ingress/egress points of the domain without affecting the security policy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ITA 11)
Open AccessArticle A Survey of Patterns for Web Services Security and Reliability Standards
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 430-450; doi:10.3390/fi4020430
Received: 16 January 2012 / Revised: 26 March 2012 / Accepted: 16 April 2012 / Published: 20 April 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (557 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An important aspect for the acceptance of Service-Oriented Architectures is having convenient ways to help designers build secure applications. Numerous standards define ways to apply security in web services. However, these standards are rather complex and sometimes overlap, which makes them hard [...] Read more.
An important aspect for the acceptance of Service-Oriented Architectures is having convenient ways to help designers build secure applications. Numerous standards define ways to apply security in web services. However, these standards are rather complex and sometimes overlap, which makes them hard to use and may produce inconsistencies. Representing them as patterns makes them easier to understand, to compare to other patterns, to discover inconsistencies, and to use them to build secure web services applications. Security patterns abstract the key aspects of a security mechanism and can thus be applied by non-experts. We survey here our work on security patterns for web services and their standards and we put them in perspective with respect to each other and to more fundamental patterns. We also consider other patterns for web services security. All the patterns described here have been previously published, we only show here one of them in detail as an illustration of our style for writing patterns. Our main purpose here is to enumerate them, show their use, and show how they relate to each other. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Web Services)
Open AccessArticle Collaborative Open Source Geospatial Tools and Maps Supporting the Response Planning to Disastrous Earthquake Events
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 451-468; doi:10.3390/fi4020451
Received: 29 December 2011 / Revised: 20 March 2012 / Accepted: 27 April 2012 / Published: 7 May 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1296 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The latest improvements in geo-informatics offer new opportunities in a wide range of territorial and environmental applications. In this general framework, a relevant issue is represented by earthquake early warning and emergency management. This research work presents the investigation and development of [...] Read more.
The latest improvements in geo-informatics offer new opportunities in a wide range of territorial and environmental applications. In this general framework, a relevant issue is represented by earthquake early warning and emergency management. This research work presents the investigation and development of a simple and innovative geospatial methodology and related collaborative open source geospatial tools for predicting and mapping the vulnerability to seismic hazard in order to support the response planning to disastrous events. The proposed geospatial methodology and tools have been integrated into an open source collaborative GIS system, designed and developed as an integrated component of an earthquake early warning and emergency management system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
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Open AccessArticle Security Analysis in the Migration to Cloud Environments
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 469-487; doi:10.3390/fi4020469
Received: 20 December 2011 / Revised: 23 April 2012 / Accepted: 24 April 2012 / Published: 8 May 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (253 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cloud computing is a new paradigm that combines several computing concepts and technologies of the Internet creating a platform for more agile and cost-effective business applications and IT infrastructure. The adoption of Cloud computing has been increasing for some time and the [...] Read more.
Cloud computing is a new paradigm that combines several computing concepts and technologies of the Internet creating a platform for more agile and cost-effective business applications and IT infrastructure. The adoption of Cloud computing has been increasing for some time and the maturity of the market is steadily growing. Security is the question most consistently raised as consumers look to move their data and applications to the cloud. We justify the importance and motivation of security in the migration of legacy systems and we carry out an analysis of different approaches related to security in migration processes to cloud with the aim of finding the needs, concerns, requirements, aspects, opportunities and benefits of security in the migration process of legacy systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Web Services)
Open AccessArticle Distributed Performance Measurement and Usability Assessment of the Tor Anonymization Network
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 488-513; doi:10.3390/fi4020488
Received: 1 November 2011 / Revised: 2 March 2012 / Accepted: 8 May 2012 / Published: 15 May 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1671 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While the Internet increasingly permeates everyday life of individuals around the world, it becomes crucial to prevent unauthorized collection and abuse of personalized information. Internet anonymization software such as Tor is an important instrument to protect online privacy. However, due to the [...] Read more.
While the Internet increasingly permeates everyday life of individuals around the world, it becomes crucial to prevent unauthorized collection and abuse of personalized information. Internet anonymization software such as Tor is an important instrument to protect online privacy. However, due to the performance overhead caused by Tor, many Internet users refrain from using it. This causes a negative impact on the overall privacy provided by Tor, since it depends on the size of the user community and availability of shared resources. Detailed measurements about the performance of Tor are crucial for solving this issue. This paper presents comparative experiments on Tor latency and throughput for surfing to 500 popular websites from several locations around the world during the period of 28 days. Furthermore, we compare these measurements to critical latency thresholds gathered from web usability research, including our own user studies. Our results indicate that without massive future optimizations of Tor performance, it is unlikely that a larger part of Internet users would adopt it for everyday usage. This leads to fewer resources available to the Tor community than theoretically possible, and increases the exposure of privacy-concerned individuals. Furthermore, this could lead to an adoption barrier of similar privacy-enhancing technologies for a Future Internet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Privacy in the Future Internet)
Open AccessArticle Young Patients’ Views on the Open Web 2.0 Childhood Diabetes Patient Portal: A Qualitative Study
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 514-527; doi:10.3390/fi4020514
Received: 11 April 2012 / Revised: 3 May 2012 / Accepted: 9 May 2012 / Published: 18 May 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (632 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Little is known about the views of young patients themselves on interactive Web portal services provided by pediatric practitioners. We aimed to explore their perceptions of a real-world diabetes portal that offers facts and contact with peers and practitioners; e.g., discussion forums, [...] Read more.
Little is known about the views of young patients themselves on interactive Web portal services provided by pediatric practitioners. We aimed to explore their perceptions of a real-world diabetes portal that offers facts and contact with peers and practitioners; e.g., discussion forums, blog tools, self-care and treatment information, research updates and news from local practitioners. Twelve young patients (ages 12–21, median 15 years), one boyfriend, 7 mothers and one father each wrote an essay on their experience from use of the portal. Their essays underwent qualitative content analysis. A major theme was “Helping and facilitating daily life with diabetes”, the portal was perceived as a place where contents are interesting, inspiring and may trigger users’ curiosity. There were three subthemes; “Ease of use in my everyday life,” which includes the perception that the portal was perceived as smooth and easy to enter and navigate whenever needed; that information was easy to understand for different groups of users. “Support via an exchange of experience,” includes the ability to contact peers being regarded advantageous. Some said that just reading others’ experiences can be helpful in terms of persevering; children could find peers in the same age group. “Evidence based information,” includes the perception of the portal being a useful and trustworthy source of facts on e.g., physical activity, blood glucose, medical devices, emotional wellbeing, food and nutrition, and other aspects that impact living with diabetes. Young users expressed positive perceptions towards the interactive web portal. Such services seem to have great potential for supporting young patients and significant others - intergrading for confidence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future e-Health)
Open AccessArticle Assessing the Adoption of e-Government Services by Teachers in Greece
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 528-544; doi:10.3390/fi4020528
Received: 26 March 2012 / Revised: 27 April 2012 / Accepted: 10 May 2012 / Published: 21 May 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Technological developments and governments’ understanding of what citizens need usually determine the design of public online services. For successful implementation of e-Government services, governments have to place the user in the center of future developments, understand what citizens need and measure what [...] Read more.
Technological developments and governments’ understanding of what citizens need usually determine the design of public online services. For successful implementation of e-Government services, governments have to place the user in the center of future developments, understand what citizens need and measure what increases citizens’ willingness to adopt e-government services. The paper uses the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), the extended TAM, the Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory and the important determinants of user acceptance perceived risk and trust, in order to describe teachers’ behavioral intensions to adopt e-Government services. A model containing trust and risk, along with cognitive, social and intrinsic factors is used to study the intentions of e-Government use by Greek primary and secondary education teachers. Two hundred and thirty teachers responded to an online survey. Findings reveal that cognitive and intrinsic factors have significant effects on intentions to use e-Government websites. Full article
Open AccessArticle Crowd Sourcing for Conservation: Web 2.0 a Powerful Tool for Biologists
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 551-562; doi:10.3390/fi4020551
Received: 1 February 2012 / Revised: 7 May 2012 / Accepted: 10 May 2012 / Published: 24 May 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (463 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The advent and adoption of Web 2.0 technologies offers a powerful approach to enhancing the capture of information in natural resource ecology, notably community knowledge of species distributions. Such information has previously been collected using, for example, postal surveys; these are typically [...] Read more.
The advent and adoption of Web 2.0 technologies offers a powerful approach to enhancing the capture of information in natural resource ecology, notably community knowledge of species distributions. Such information has previously been collected using, for example, postal surveys; these are typically inefficient, with low response rates, high costs, and requiring respondents to be spatially literate. Here we describe an example, using the Google Maps Application Programming Interface, to discuss the opportunities such tools provide to conservation biology. Toad Tracker was created as a prototype to demonstrate the utility of this technology to document the distribution of an invasive vertebrate pest species, the cane toad, within Australia. While the technological aspects of this tool are satisfactory, manager resistance towards its use raises issues around the public nature of the technology, the collaborative (non-expert) role in data collection, and data ownership. We conclude in suggesting that, for such tools to be accepted by non-innovation adopters, work is required on both the technological aspects and, importantly, a cultural change is required to create an environment of acceptance of the shifting relationship between authority, expertise and knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle The U-City Paradigm: Opportunities and Risks for E-Democracy in Collaborative Planning
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 563-574; doi:10.3390/fi4020563
Received: 25 January 2012 / Revised: 5 March 2012 / Accepted: 22 May 2012 / Published: 5 June 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (283 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) tools appear to enhance the possibilities offered by a collaborative approach to planning. The present paper analyzes both the results of experiences of the author and of those available in the literature, highlighting possible advantages and disadvantages. After [...] Read more.
Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) tools appear to enhance the possibilities offered by a collaborative approach to planning. The present paper analyzes both the results of experiences of the author and of those available in the literature, highlighting possible advantages and disadvantages. After a brief introduction to the meaning of e-democracy, the second part focuses on the role of ICT in collaborative planning, proceeding in the third part to an illustration of an initial panorama of knowledge gathered using ICT in such processes, while discussing criticisms and opportunities. The fourth part discusses the U-city paradigm as a driver of change in urban planning participation processes. Research perspectives are then outlined in the final part. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Using Crowdsourced Indoor Geodata for the Creation of a Three-Dimensional Indoor Routing Web Application
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 575-591; doi:10.3390/fi4020575
Received: 5 April 2012 / Revised: 4 May 2012 / Accepted: 29 May 2012 / Published: 6 June 2012
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (1076 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Routing services for outdoor areas are omnipresent and also three-dimensional (3D) visualization is quite common within this area. Recent research efforts are now trying to adapt well known outdoor routing services to complex indoor environments. However, most of the current indoor routing [...] Read more.
Routing services for outdoor areas are omnipresent and also three-dimensional (3D) visualization is quite common within this area. Recent research efforts are now trying to adapt well known outdoor routing services to complex indoor environments. However, most of the current indoor routing systems only focus on two-dimensional visualization, thus only one level can be depicted. Especially multi-level routes therefore lack visualization. Also, most of the (few) existing 3D indoor routing services utilize proprietary software or plugins, thus a widespread accessibility for those services by using common computers or mobile devices is not feasible. Therefore this paper describes the development of a web-based 3D routing system based on a new HTML extension. The visualization of rooms as well as the computed routes is realized with XML3D. Since this emerging technology is based on WebGL and will likely be integrated into the HTML5 standard, the developed system is already compatible with most common browsers such as Google Chrome or Firefox. Another key difference of the approach presented in this paper is that all utilized data is actually crowdsourced geodata from OpenStreetMap (OSM). Such data is collaboratively collected by both amateurs and professionals and can be used at no charge under the Open Data Commons Open Database License (ODbL). Our research combines user-generated geo content of the Web 2.0 with future Internet technology for the provision of a ubiquitously accessible 3D indoor routing application. Full article
Open AccessArticle Focus on Citizens: Public Engagement with Online and Face-to-Face Participation—A Case Study
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 592-606; doi:10.3390/fi4020592
Received: 2 March 2012 / Revised: 3 May 2012 / Accepted: 7 June 2012 / Published: 15 June 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1094 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main objective of this paper is to focus on how an integrated system based on Information Communication Technology (ICT) and face-to-face communication can increase participation in order to have a positive effect on quality of life, plans and decisions, and to [...] Read more.
The main objective of this paper is to focus on how an integrated system based on Information Communication Technology (ICT) and face-to-face communication can increase participation in order to have a positive effect on quality of life, plans and decisions, and to discuss the many benefits which web-based public participation can bring to the planning process through a set of improvements to relations, quality and structure of cities in general and in this case example specifically. With the development of a transparent support system for collaborative decision-making processes, it is possible to identify a strategy for addressing gaps to reach collaborative decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning)
Open AccessArticle Smart Homes for Older People: Positive Aging in a Digital World
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 607-617; doi:10.3390/fi4020607
Received: 18 April 2012 / Revised: 15 June 2012 / Accepted: 18 June 2012 / Published: 19 June 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (197 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Smart homes are homes with technologically advanced systems to enable domestic task automation, easier communication, and higher security. As an enabler of health and well-being enhancement, smart homes have been geared to accommodate people with special needs, especially older people. This paper [...] Read more.
Smart homes are homes with technologically advanced systems to enable domestic task automation, easier communication, and higher security. As an enabler of health and well-being enhancement, smart homes have been geared to accommodate people with special needs, especially older people. This paper examines the concept of “smart home” in a technologically driven society and its multi-functional contribution to the enhancement of older people’s lives. Discussion then focuses on the challenges in the use of smart homes among older people such as accessibility and ethical issues. Finally, some implications and recommendations are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future e-Health)

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