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Molecules, Volume 6, Issue 2 (February 2001), Pages 67-141

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial RACI Natural Products Group Symposium
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 67-69; doi:10.3390/60100067
Received: 5 December 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
PDF Full-text (10 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Indole Derivatives from the Egg Masses of Muricid Molluscs
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 70-78; doi:10.3390/60100070
Received: 26 July 2000 / Accepted: 1 October 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 33 | PDF Full-text (48 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A range of brominated indole derivatives were found in the egg masses of six species of muricid molluscs. Several non-brominated indoles were also present in the eggs of two Mediterranean Muricidae, although these were not found in the Australian species. Tyrindoleninone (3), [...] Read more.
A range of brominated indole derivatives were found in the egg masses of six species of muricid molluscs. Several non-brominated indoles were also present in the eggs of two Mediterranean Muricidae, although these were not found in the Australian species. Tyrindoleninone (3), was the only compound found in all six species and is likely to be responsible for the observed antimicrobial activity of these muricid egg masses [1,2]. These bioactive indoles appear to be characteristic of muricid egg masses and were not found in the egg masses from 17 species in different families of marine molluscs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)
Open AccessArticle The Effect of Mechanical Wounding on the Composition of Essential Oil from Ocimum Minimum L. Leaves
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 79-86; doi:10.3390/60100079
Received: 10 September 2000 / Accepted: 30 November 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (57 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of mechanical damage on the composition of the essential oil obtained from eugenol-rich Ocimum minimum leaves was determined over 48 hours. Changes in the levels of five oil-constituents were detected in the first post-wounding day but only one of those [...] Read more.
The effect of mechanical damage on the composition of the essential oil obtained from eugenol-rich Ocimum minimum leaves was determined over 48 hours. Changes in the levels of five oil-constituents were detected in the first post-wounding day but only one of those components (camphor) exhibited the same behaviour the day after. The levels of eugenol (-4.8%) and linalool (+2.5%) were affected the most by the wounding process. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed the post-wounding response to be independent from the pre-wounding levels of the particular compounds expressing the response and from the overall leaf oil-composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)
Open AccessArticle Determining the Antimicrobial Actions of Tea Tree Oil
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 87-91; doi:10.3390/60100087
Received: 17 August 2000 / Accepted: 20 October 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 78 | PDF Full-text (28 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Research into the mode of action of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea tree oil) is briefly reviewed. Its mode of action is interpreted in terms of the membrane-toxicity of its monoterpenoid components and different approaches for determining cell membrane damage [...] Read more.
Research into the mode of action of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea tree oil) is briefly reviewed. Its mode of action is interpreted in terms of the membrane-toxicity of its monoterpenoid components and different approaches for determining cell membrane damage are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)
Open AccessArticle Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) of Monoterpenes from the Leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree)
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 92-103; doi:10.3390/60100092
Received: 23 November 2000 / Accepted: 30 November 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (104 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The technique of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was applied to various sample matrices under a range of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) densities and chamber temperatures. The purpose was to develop an effective extraction condition for the removal of eight target [...] Read more.
The technique of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) was applied to various sample matrices under a range of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) densities and chamber temperatures. The purpose was to develop an effective extraction condition for the removal of eight target monoterpenes from Australian tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia Cheel) leaves. The optimum conditions for extraction were found to be 0.25 g/mL scCO2 density at a chamber temperature of 110oC. These condition were most effective when applied to whole fresh and rehydrated whole dried leaves, where it yielded maximum recovery of target analytes with minimum change in oil composition for the extractor system employed. This study demonstrates the importance of the type of sample matrix used in SFE work, and that a different extraction protocol would need to be developed for each matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)
Open AccessArticle Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 117-129; doi:10.3390/60100117
Received: 12 May 2000 / Accepted: 1 October 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (68 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively [...] Read more.
Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on structural elucidation of some of the alkaloids is reported briefly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)
Open AccessArticle Natural Products From Sponges of the Genus Agelas - on the Trail of a [2+2]-Photoaddition Enzyme
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 130-141; doi:10.3390/60100130
Received: 4 July 2000 / Accepted: 10 January 2001 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
By specifically targeting sponges likely to contain oroidin derivatives, we have, for the first time, identified Australian sponges that contain sceptrin (2) and related compounds. Using a simple extraction technique and HPLC (with a photodiode array detector) in combination with LC-MS and [...] Read more.
By specifically targeting sponges likely to contain oroidin derivatives, we have, for the first time, identified Australian sponges that contain sceptrin (2) and related compounds. Using a simple extraction technique and HPLC (with a photodiode array detector) in combination with LC-MS and MS-MS we have been able to quickly identify known compounds and flag the presence of some new compounds in the extracts. Further work will entail isolation and structure elucidation of the new compounds and collection of fresh Agelas sp.1 with the aim of isolating the enzyme that catalyses the [2 + 2] dimerisation or oroidin to sceptrin Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessReview The Odour, the Animal and the Plant
Molecules 2001, 6(2), 104-116; doi:10.3390/60100104
Received: 30 August 2000 / Accepted: 1 October 2000 / Published: 16 January 2001
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (100 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A review of the literature is presented that gives a background to the human sense of smell, then the importance of learnt and innate olfactory cues in animal behaviour. Some possible roles for natural products chemists interested in the interaction between animals [...] Read more.
A review of the literature is presented that gives a background to the human sense of smell, then the importance of learnt and innate olfactory cues in animal behaviour. Some possible roles for natural products chemists interested in the interaction between animals and plants are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RACI Natural Products Group Symposium)

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