Special Issue "Applications Based on Symmetrical Characteristics of the Human Body"

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Karl Grammer

Department of Anthropology, University of Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +43 1 4277 9547
Interests: geometric morphometrics; computer supported analysis and simulation of human behavior; human ethology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Most organisms are bilaterally symmetric and symmetry is supposed to contribute to biological fitness. Indeed, developmental stability refers to the capacity of an individual to produce a well-developed, symmetrical phenotype in the face of developmental perturbations caused by factors, such as disease, toxins, parasites, etc. The inability of an organism to implement such a developmental program when challenged by developmental stress leads to small random deviations in bilateral symmetry. Such deviations are referred to as fluctuating asymmetry, and may provide a measure of an individual’s exposure to adverse developmental effects and its corresponding ability to resist such stresses.

In humans, there is now considerable evidence that developmental stability relates to numerous biological fitness components. Hence, a symmetrical construction may signal the ability of an individual to cope with challenges in their environment. Numerous studies, for instance, have demonstrated that assessments of attractiveness are sensitive to facial symmetry, and might be linked with reproductive success while physical performance is dependent on symmetrical body construction. However, there are many open questions concerning the mathematical methods uses to assess symmetry and fluctuating asymmetry in 2D and 3D, or which parts of the body are affected by fluctuating asymmetry.

Prof. Dr. Karl Grammer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • The symmetrical human

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Human Bodily Asymmetry Relates to Behavioral Lateralization and May not Reliably Reflect Developmental Instability
Symmetry 2018, 10(4), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10040117
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 7 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
PDF Full-text (1124 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
(1) Background: The link between behavioral lateralization and bodily asymmetry in humans is studied to investigate the reliability of fluctuating asymmetry as a measure of developmental instability; (2) Methods: Morphological asymmetries of arms and legs, obtained from 3D body scans, were correlated with
[...] Read more.
(1) Background: The link between behavioral lateralization and bodily asymmetry in humans is studied to investigate the reliability of fluctuating asymmetry as a measure of developmental instability; (2) Methods: Morphological asymmetries of arms and legs, obtained from 3D body scans, were correlated with different measures of behavioral lateralization; (3) Results: Observed associations were in the directions expected, showing that more asymmetric use of the body increases asymmetry, especially in the arms, and more symmetric body use appears to have a symmetrizing effect; and (4) Conclusions: The results presented here question the suitability of human bodily asymmetry in arms and legs—or at least part of them—as a measure of developmental instability. There is a need for future research that identifies regions of the body that are not affected by behavioral lateralization and can reliably reflect developmental instability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications Based on Symmetrical Characteristics of the Human Body)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

(1)Title: Association Patterns between Fluctuating Asymmetry and Parameters of
Growth and Robustness among Kung San and Kavango People of Namibia
Authors: Sylvia Kirchengast
Affiliation: Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna
Abstract: Fluctuating asymmetry, which describes  small random deviations from
perfect symmetry  in bilaterally-paired structures, is mainly interprted
as an indicator of devlopmental instability. Consequently increased
fluctuating asymmetry is found among people suffering from various
pathological conditions but  also from increased stress during somatic
development. Directional asymmetry, in contrast,  refers to a pattern of
bilateral variation in a group of individuals, but the larger side is
mainly the same side for all individuals. Among humans, a typical
example of dirctional asymmetry is found for upper limb dimesnions due
to handedness. In the present study association patterns between fluctuating as well as directional asymmetry and parameters of somatic growth and robustness
among 236 !Kung San and 248 Kavango people of Namibia between the ages
of 18 and 65 years are analysed. Fluctuating asymmetry was determined by
ear length, ear breadth, foot length and foot breadth, while directional
asymmetry was determined by hand length and hand breadth dimensions. Fluctuating asymmetry correlated negatively with various parameters of robustness and growth in both populations and in both sexes. The results are interpeted as a corroboration of the theory that developmental stress may increase fluctuating assymetry.

(2)Title: Assessment of Pattern and Shape Symmetry of Bilateral Normal-Corneas by Scheimpflug Technology
Authors: F. Cavas-Martínez1,*, D. Piñero2, D.G. Fernández-Pacheco1, J. Mira1, F.J.F. Cañavate1, J. Alió3,4
Affiliations: 1 Department of Graphical Expression, Technical University of Cartagena, C/ Doctor Flemming s/n, Cartagena 30202, Spain
2 Group of Optics and Visual Perception, Department of Optics, Pharmacology and Anatomy, University of Alicante, Spain
3 Keratoconus Unit of Vissum Corporation, C/ Cabañal nº 1, Alicante 03016, Spain
4 Department of Ophtalmology, Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Crta. Nacional 332 s/n, San Juan de Alicante 03550, Spain
*Correspondence: francisco.cavas@upct.es; Tel.: +034-968-338-856; fax: +034-968-326-474
Abstract: Purpose: the aim of this study was to assess bilateral symmetry in normal fellow eyes by using optical and geometrical morphometric parameters.
Methods: All participants underwent complete bi-ocular examinations. Scheimpflug tomography data from 66 eyes (33 OD/ 33 OS) of 33 patients were registered. The interocular symmetry was based on five different patterns: morpho-geometric symmetry, axial symmetry at the corneal vertex, angular-spatial symmetry, direct symmetry (equal octants) and enantiomorph (mirror octants).

Title: Association patterns between fluctuating asymmetry and parameters of growth and robustness among !Kung San and Kavango people of Namibia
Author: Sylvia Kirchengast
Affiliation: Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna
Abstract: In the present study association patterns between fluctuating as well as directional asymmetry and parameters of somatic growth and robustness among 236 !Kung San and 248 Kavango people of Namibia between the ages of 18 and 65 years are analysed. Fluctuating asymmetry was determined by ear length, ear breadth, foot length and foot breadth, while directional asymmetry was determined by hand length and hand breadth dimensions. Fluctuating asymmetry correlated negatively with various parameters of robustness and growth in both populations and in both sexes. The results are interpeted as a corroboration of the theory that developmental stress may increase fluctuating assymetry

 

Title: Assessment of pattern and shape symmetry of bilateral normal-corneas by Scheimpflug Technology
Authors: F. Cavas-Martínez1,*, D. Piñero2, D.G. Fernández-Pacheco1, J. Mira1, F.J.F. Cañavate1, J. Alió3,4
Affiliation:1Department of Graphical Expression, Technical University of Cartagena, C/ Doctor Flemming s/n, Cartagena 30202, Spain
2Group of Optics and Visual Perception, Department of Optics, Pharmacology and Anatomy, University of Alicante, Spain
3Keratoconus Unit of Vissum Corporation, C/ Cabañal nº 1, Alicante 03016, Spain
4Department of Ophtalmology, Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Crta. Nacional 332 s/n, San Juan de Alicante 03550, Spain
Corresponding author: Tel.: +034-968-338-856; fax: +034-968-326-474; E-mail address: Abstract: Purpose: the aim of this study was to assess bilateral symmetry in normal fellow eyes by using optical and geometrical morphometric parameters. Methods: All participants underwent complete bi-ocular examinations. Scheimpflug tomography data from 66 eyes (33 OD/ 33 OS) of 33 patients were registered. The interocular symmetry was based on five different patterns: morpho-geometric symmetry, axial symmetry at the corneal vertex, angular-spatial symmetry, direct symmetry (equal octants) and enantiomorph (mirror octants).

 

Back to Top