E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Luigi Fusco Girard

Department of Conservation of Architectural and Environmental Heritage, University of Naples Federico II, Via Roma, 402, 80132, Napoli, Italy
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter Nijkamp

Department of Spatial Economics, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Free University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Guest Editor
Drs. Karima Kourtit

Department of Spatial Economics, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Free University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The grandfather of modern economics, Adam Smith, referred already to seashores and riverbanks as poles of economic wealth, as their openness allowed them to establish trade relationships with the rest of the world. In the course of time, ports have developed as major logistic magnets inducing trade and transport connections all over the world. And consequently, many port areas laid the foundation for a rise in welfare, not only for the direct areas concerned, but also for the hinterlands connected with these areas and for all other places served by these ports. Port areas were always hotspots of economic activity.
In the past decades, many port areas have gone through a phase of decline, as they became outdated or were replaced by modern facilities elsewhere. This has left many cities with large harbour front areas that were dilapidated and showed clear signs of environmental decay and even poverty. Such brownfields have increasingly become a source of policy concern and have stimulated the emergence of various land use initiatives in order to exploit the hitherto unused economic, social, logistic, cultural and environmental opportunities of such areas. As a result, many cities have in the past years developed new policy mechanisms for upgrading their port brownfields through harbour front and seafront development (e.g. the London Dockyards, the Kop van Zuid in Rotterdam, Cape Town, New York, Yokohama, Singapore, Helsinki etc.). The two keywords in this drastic land use conversion are: sustainable development and creative sector stimulation.
Nowadays, port areas can constitute the entry point and core place for sustainable development for the entire urban system. To understand and exploit this potential, it will be necessary to design an analytical framework which would link the new opportunities provided by traditional port areas to creative and sustainable urban development. From that perspective, there is a need to develop fit-for-purpose, dedicated policy tools and initiatives, on the basis of general planning principles for harbour front and sea front development. This task would have to be undertaken against the background of the challenge to improve the socio-economic and ecological resilience of a port area – in relation to the city system – and to activate many initiatives that would convert historico-cultural urban port landscapes into sustainable and creative hotspots, starting from re-using, recovering and regenerating such places. This would also call for a new analytical apparatus in which integrated assessment of novel initiatives would have to be ensured in order to balance also conflicts between interests and values of a multiplicity of stakeholders. A simultaneous improvement of policy goals associated with port development – such as job creation, foreign direct investment, creative sector development, environmentally-benign mobility, and sustainable land use – would thus be a major task for a modern city.
Clearly, cities are not only engines of economic progress, but they are also the places where cultural heritage is prominently present. This also holds for port cities, which house a wealth of remainings from the past: warehouses, silos, wharfs, lighthouses, industrial archaeology, and so forth. It seems therefore plausible to seek the anchor points of urban rehabilitation of port areas in their undervalued land use related to past activities from the past. The general condition is that cities should be able to develop highly innovative strategic approaches of planning, conservation and management that really integrate harbour development into urban development. Indeed, organizational and economic innovation is key to improve the resilience of a city/port system, and thus the overall sustainability.
Good practices can be found in various urban economies, and good practices exist also in the conservation of cultural heritage and historic landscape port areas. They should be carefully assessed in their capacity to combine and balance intangible values and economic potentials. The main focus of this special issue of Sustainability would be on the barriers and opportunities of historical waterfront development projects in various cities. Thus, pre-eminent goals of this special issue is to bring together a collection of original and operational contributions that address:
• appropriate indicators and research tools for mapping out the performance of new port area/city development initiatives
• principles that would reconcile the different objectives and initiatives of a multiplicity of distinct stakeholders
• necessary conditions for the design of the creative sector and sustainable developments in port areas/cities
• learning modes based on good practices or experiences in various parts of the world

Prof. Dr. Luigi Fusco Girard
Prof. Dr. Peter Nijkamp
Drs. Karima Kourtit
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Published Papers (13 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-13
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Waterfront Areas as Hotspots of Sustainable and Creative Development of Cities
Sustainability 2014, 6(7), 4580-4586; doi:10.3390/su6074580
Received: 4 September 2013 / Revised: 2 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 July 2014 / Published: 22 July 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (512 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This special issue of Sustainability is devoted to a very important sustainability topic, viz. cities and waterfront infrastructure. The presence of—and access to—water has been a critical factor in the long history of settlement patterns of humankind. Water is not only a necessary
[...] Read more.
This special issue of Sustainability is devoted to a very important sustainability topic, viz. cities and waterfront infrastructure. The presence of—and access to—water has been a critical factor in the long history of settlement patterns of humankind. Water is not only a necessary consumption good for survival, but has also an important production potential in an economic sense. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle New Futures for Older Ports: Synergistic Development in a Global Urban System
Sustainability 2013, 5(12), 5100-5118; doi:10.3390/su5125100
Received: 12 November 2013 / Accepted: 18 November 2013 / Published: 29 November 2013
PDF Full-text (1499 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Port cities are on the front-line of a changing global urban system. There are problems from restructuring of trade, logistics and ship-building, creating economic dependency, social exclusion and cultural destruction. Meanwhile, there exists new opportunities in heritage tourism, cultural industries and ecological restoration,
[...] Read more.
Port cities are on the front-line of a changing global urban system. There are problems from restructuring of trade, logistics and ship-building, creating economic dependency, social exclusion and cultural destruction. Meanwhile, there exists new opportunities in heritage tourism, cultural industries and ecological restoration, but these opportunities often have negative impacts. This paper addresses the question of how port cities can steer from negative to positive development paths and outcomes. It sets out a way of working with inter-connected economic, social, political and technological factors—a ‘synergistic’ approach to mapping of problems and design of policy responses. Looking at three contrasting examples of port cities—Liverpool, Dubai and Mauritius—we can compare the inter-connected dynamics of growth and decline. Then we can understand the inter-connected factors of successful regeneration and sustainable prosperity, not as linear ‘policy fixes’, but more like synergistic processes of learning, innovation and capacity building. These call for new models for creative innovation in social and community enterprise: cultural heritage both old and new; new social finance and investment; socio-ecological restoration with participative governance, etc. Such pathways and opportunities are now emerging in many different locations; this paper provides methods and tools to understand them and promote them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Figures

Open AccessArticle On the Revitalized Waterfront: Creative Milieu for Creative Tourism
Sustainability 2013, 5(11), 4578-4593; doi:10.3390/su5114578
Received: 12 September 2013 / Accepted: 13 September 2013 / Published: 25 October 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1366 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of revitalized historic urban waterfronts as potential creative milieus attracting creative tourists. Waterfront redevelopment raises issues concerning an extensive range of urban planning and management perspectives, extending from space design to economic, environmental,
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of revitalized historic urban waterfronts as potential creative milieus attracting creative tourists. Waterfront redevelopment raises issues concerning an extensive range of urban planning and management perspectives, extending from space design to economic, environmental, cultural, and tourism considerations. The paper first reviews the ways in which the relationship between waterfronts and urban functions of port-cities has evolved over time, before turning to the examination of historic waterfronts’ redevelopment as creative milieus to host creative industries. The agglomeration of creative industries, cultural organizations and venues, and recreational facilities in urban spaces is widely recognized to generate a dynamic urban culture attracting a new wave of “creative tourists”, which do not fit to the mainstream cultural tourism behavior, and prefer to visit lively creative spaces based, not only on heritage, but also on contemporary culture. In this paper, the analysis focuses on how historic revitalized waterfronts can act as creative milieus, based on port-cities’ genius loci as cosmopolitan places of intercultural communication, offering a new alternative approach to urban cultural tourism and hopefully functioning as a spin wheel for the regeneration of the urban economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle The Use of Visual Decision Support Tools in an Interactive Stakeholder Analysis—Old Ports as New Magnets for Creative Urban Development
Sustainability 2013, 5(10), 4379-4405; doi:10.3390/su5104379
Received: 5 September 2013 / Accepted: 30 September 2013 / Published: 17 October 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1582 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Port cities are historically important breeding places of civilization and wealth, and act as attractive high-quality and sustainable places to live and work. They are core places for sustainable development for the entire spatial system as a result of their dynamism, which has
[...] Read more.
Port cities are historically important breeding places of civilization and wealth, and act as attractive high-quality and sustainable places to live and work. They are core places for sustainable development for the entire spatial system as a result of their dynamism, which has in recent years reinforced their position as magnets in a spatial-economic force field. To understand and exploit this potential, the present study presents an analytical framework that links the opportunities provided by traditional port areas/cities to creative, resilient and sustainable urban development. Using evidence-based research, findings are presented from a case study by employing a stakeholder-based model—with interactive visual support tools as novel analysis methods—in a backcasting and forecasting exercise for sustainable development. The empirical study is carried out in and around the NDSM-area, a former dockyard in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Various future images were used—in an interactive assessment incorporating classes of important stakeholders—as strategic vehicles to identify important policy challenges, and to evaluate options for converting historical-cultural urban port landscapes into sustainable and creative hotspots, starting by reusing, recovering, and regenerating such areas. This approach helps to identify successful policy strategies, and to bring together different forms of expertise in order to resolve conflicts between the interests (or values) of a multiplicity of stakeholders, with a view to stimulating economic vitality in combination with meeting social needs and ensuring the conservation of eco-systems in redesigning old port areas. The results indicate that the interactive policy support tools developed for the case study are fit for purpose, and are instrumental in designing sustainable urban port areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle Toward a Smart Sustainable Development of Port Cities/Areas: The Role of the “Historic Urban Landscape” Approach
Sustainability 2013, 5(10), 4329-4348; doi:10.3390/su5104329
Received: 30 August 2013 / Accepted: 24 September 2013 / Published: 2 October 2013
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1192 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After the 2008 crisis, smart sustainable development of port areas/cities should be developed on the basis of specific principles: the synergy principle (between different actors/systems, in particular the socio-cultural and economic system), the creativity principle and the circularization principle. The Historic Urban landscape
[...] Read more.
After the 2008 crisis, smart sustainable development of port areas/cities should be developed on the basis of specific principles: the synergy principle (between different actors/systems, in particular the socio-cultural and economic system), the creativity principle and the circularization principle. The Historic Urban landscape (HUL) approach becomes the guarantee that the transition toward the smart city development model is based on specific local cultural resources, and not only on technological innovations. In other words, the eco-town/eco-city strategy becomes culture-led. It stimulates places as spatial “loci” for implementing synergies and circularization processes. Without new evaluation tools and a widespread “evaluation culture” the risks in implementing HUL are very high. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle Historic Urban Landscape Approach and Port Cities Regeneration: Naples between Identity and Outlook
Sustainability 2013, 5(10), 4268-4287; doi:10.3390/su5104268
Received: 2 September 2013 / Revised: 2 September 2013 / Accepted: 23 September 2013 / Published: 30 September 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2124 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to highlight some perspectives for the sustainable development of Naples, to direct future policies for the city. The proposed approach is based on the Historic Urban Landscape, which, being structurally integrated/systemic, allows the relationship between the historic
[...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to highlight some perspectives for the sustainable development of Naples, to direct future policies for the city. The proposed approach is based on the Historic Urban Landscape, which, being structurally integrated/systemic, allows the relationship between the historic center and the waterfront, as well as many contradictions, to be overcome, which in the city of Naples, have become particularly acute. The notion of Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) is the latest contribution to the international debate concerning the identification, preservation and valorization of cultural heritage. This new category, in fact, refers to the notion of context to emphasize the systemic interrelation between economic, social, environmental and cultural factors and the complexity of the framework within which conservation policies are inserted. It is in this perspective that the experiences of planning taking place in Naples are read, as a starting point for an innovative approach to the issue of an integrated conservation of the Historic Urban Landscape and, more generally, of the regeneration of the city. The starting point is the study of the experiences of urban transformation in some European port cities in order to “learn from comparison” to develop a theoretic approach based on the understanding of reality. The comparative analysis of case studies, through the synthesis of the most significant aspects of each port city, allows the relationship that exists between a phenomenon and its context to be understood and the critical success factors to be identified, in order to transfer the knowledge gained from good practices in the processes of regeneration of the city of Naples. Naples, for its stratified urban fabric, rich in tangible and intangible cultural values, and for its particular nodal position within the Mediterranean basin, lends itself effectively to a different approach to urban regeneration, which focuses on the relationship between the historic city and the sea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle The Sustainability of Mediterranean Port Areas: Environmental Management for Local Regeneration in Valencia
Sustainability 2013, 5(10), 4288-4311; doi:10.3390/su5104288
Received: 5 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 30 September 2013
PDF Full-text (1484 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urban renovation projects, which have led to the conversion of port areas through a new vision of waterfronts as elements of the potential development of the urban system in its entirety, have spread since the early 1950s and now some port cities are
[...] Read more.
Urban renovation projects, which have led to the conversion of port areas through a new vision of waterfronts as elements of the potential development of the urban system in its entirety, have spread since the early 1950s and now some port cities are able to trigger some mechanisms which, even if they are the result of some processes that have been activated for decades and which are still evolving, are able to amplify and to extend over time their generated positive impacts. These impacts also produce a system of relations in the context of the hinterland, attracted also by policies of economic, social, and cultural development. In the case of the city of Valencia, we have seen, in the last 50 years, a progressive spread of the urbanized area to the coasts, simultaneously with a process of renovation of the port area, which has been populated by important architectures, and which has been equipped by efficient infrastructures and subjected to numerous recovery and restoration operations of its historic buildings. However, the environmental conditions near the port area are not well suited to a good quality of life because ports are pollution producers, sites of urban decay, and of social degradation. A good plan can include some instruments to decrease those negative factors, leading to a close merging between the port area and the city hinterland, and generating new economies. The proposal of this research consists in a method of integrating the port planning with an environmental accounting system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle A Differentiation Framework for Maritime Clusters: Comparisons across Europe
Sustainability 2013, 5(9), 4076-4105; doi:10.3390/su5094076
Received: 30 August 2013 / Accepted: 5 September 2013 / Published: 24 September 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1444 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to point out some of the main characteristics and critical factors for success that can substantiate the proposal of a differentiation framework for maritime clusters. We conduct a benchmarking analysis intended to distinguish the most relevant aspects
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to point out some of the main characteristics and critical factors for success that can substantiate the proposal of a differentiation framework for maritime clusters. We conduct a benchmarking analysis intended to distinguish the most relevant aspects which can or should be observed in these types of clusters, applied to the following countries: Spain (Basque Country), Germany (Lander of Schleswig-Holstein), the Netherlands and Norway. The differentiation factors involve agglomeration economies and endogenous conditions derived from geographic proximity, essential for lowering transaction costs, strengthening the leverage of public/private cooperation through centres of maritime excellence, at the same time providing an adequate local environment that favours positive interactions between the different maritime industries and actors. The main results arising from this article are presented through a reconceptualisation of Porter’s Diamond framework for diagnosing the competitiveness of maritime clusters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle A Methodological Framework Based on the Dynamic-Evolutionary View of Heritage
Sustainability 2013, 5(9), 3992-4023; doi:10.3390/su5093992
Received: 6 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 23 September 2013
PDF Full-text (1796 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper describes the shifting perspective from the contemplative view to the dynamic-evolutionary view of heritage and the main characteristics of the resulting multi-criterial decision-aid tool for the evaluation of heritage. With the integration of conservation in planning processes and with opening of
[...] Read more.
The paper describes the shifting perspective from the contemplative view to the dynamic-evolutionary view of heritage and the main characteristics of the resulting multi-criterial decision-aid tool for the evaluation of heritage. With the integration of conservation in planning processes and with opening of the procedures to public participation, there is a need for decision-aid tools that can help increase rationality and transparency in decision-making processes related to planning. By understanding the contemporary view of heritage and the landscape, it is possible to create tools capable of accounting for spatial complexity and the extant cultural, social, historic and economic relations. With this in mind, a specific tool was created that can be used for the analysis, diagnosis, evaluation and monitoring of spatial heritage (registered and under consideration for protection), identifying opportunities, defining strategies for heritage management processes, and in the creation and evaluation of development and management scenarios. The paper illustrates a shift in the consideration of heritage in spatial planning and presents an application of the developed model in a case study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle Locally Based Development—Tools for Identifying Opportunities and Evaluating Port Area Strategies of Rijeka
Sustainability 2013, 5(9), 4024-4056; doi:10.3390/su5094024
Received: 6 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 23 September 2013
PDF Full-text (2291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cities are traditionally considered as centers of prosperity, but after a long process of deindustrialization, the classical opportunities presented by cities as administrative, production, financial and cultural hot spots can no longer be taken for granted without questioning the present organizational and spatial
[...] Read more.
Cities are traditionally considered as centers of prosperity, but after a long process of deindustrialization, the classical opportunities presented by cities as administrative, production, financial and cultural hot spots can no longer be taken for granted without questioning the present organizational and spatial models. After an introduction to the decision-aid tools and processes needed to orient development in a sustainable way, the paper describes the characteristics and an application of the decision-aid tool created for analysis, diagnosis and evaluation of opportunities. The proposal briefly considers the reconnection of the city with its region, urban renewal, creative and productive activities, necessary support institutions, contemporary sustainable economic approaches and infrastructure. This approach is illustrated on the case of the incubator proposal for the City of Rijeka, Croatia, once an important port and industrial city with a long history. The technological modifications in the functioning of the port and abandoning of industrial production in the proximity, but also geological formation and prevalent building typologies, make the case exemplary of the problems faced in contemporary cities. The paper proposes a process and tools for analysis and evaluation and indicators for the sustainability of the proposal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle Assessment of Urban Attractiveness of Port Cities in Southern Italy—A Case Study of Torre Annunziata
Sustainability 2013, 5(9), 3906-3925; doi:10.3390/su5093906
Received: 31 August 2013 / Accepted: 9 September 2013 / Published: 16 September 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (908 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to assess the strength and weakness factors of post-industrial cities located in the Gulf of Naples in order to propose the most effective regeneration strategies towards a sustainable development of the urban coastline. This paper focuses on
[...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to assess the strength and weakness factors of post-industrial cities located in the Gulf of Naples in order to propose the most effective regeneration strategies towards a sustainable development of the urban coastline. This paper focuses on the city of Torre Annunziata and in particular on its industrial port area and waterfront. The analysis suggests that a sustainable development would be possible through the redesign and new functionalization of the waterfront and port area, improving resilience and creativity in order to integrate economic growth, ecological preservation and social opportunities. Thus, this paper is a proposal for a participative approach to the regeneration of the urban waterfront, enhancing the creative potential of the city and developing a new image for the waterfront that could become the strategic vision for a future economic, environmental and cultural development. A comparison between the waterfronts of Torre Annunziata and La Spezia has been carried out in order to assess what are the most effective choices for the future of Torre Annunziata, followed by an applicative process based on interviews. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle Strategic Vision of a Euro-Mediterranean Port City: A Case Study of Palermo
Sustainability 2013, 5(9), 3941-3959; doi:10.3390/su5093941
Received: 1 September 2013 / Accepted: 5 September 2013 / Published: 16 September 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1060 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Italian harbours assume a decisive role in order to develop a Euro-Mediterranean web for maritime transportation. The geostrategic position of the Italian peninsula can be seen as a logistic platform at the centre of the maritime trades in the Mediterranean area, giving to
[...] Read more.
Italian harbours assume a decisive role in order to develop a Euro-Mediterranean web for maritime transportation. The geostrategic position of the Italian peninsula can be seen as a logistic platform at the centre of the maritime trades in the Mediterranean area, giving to its port cities the role of gateway of economic flows. The port poles, meant as hubs, are able to attract investments and create economic growth and territorial development through new operative models of urban usage and management. The management policies have to consider the environmental characteristics and distinctive features, respecting the identity of the places as concrete evidence of history, a source of intellectual development and therefore, cultural richness. In this sense, the current strategic plan “Palermo capital of the Euro-Mediterranean area” imagines the whole city, and not just its harbour, as a “gate city”, a sustainable and cosmopolitan city in the view of a recentralization of the Mediterranean area. The research tests an evaluation method in support of urban planning, which increases the active role of stakeholders in terms of participation and access to the decision-making process of urban renewal strategies for Palermo to the Euro-Mediterranean. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)
Open AccessArticle The Architectural Practice of Regeneration
Sustainability 2013, 5(9), 3895-3905; doi:10.3390/su5093895
Received: 4 September 2013 / Accepted: 9 September 2013 / Published: 12 September 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (666 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In form and in content, cities are the epitome of diversity. This state is the result of the accumulation of layers of history, of construction, of demolition and reconstruction cycles. These tensions are the catalyst for the emergence of new urban forms and
[...] Read more.
In form and in content, cities are the epitome of diversity. This state is the result of the accumulation of layers of history, of construction, of demolition and reconstruction cycles. These tensions are the catalyst for the emergence of new urban forms and participate in the construction of heritage. As such they should be encouraged. As important as the existing fabric of the city is, its evolution to accommodate the ever-changing needs and fashions of its inhabitants is paramount. For regeneration to be successful it must inscribe itself in this process and it must be driven by an understanding of the environment where it occurs. This paper explores, through the lens of an architectural practice, some design processes and architectural proposals that have been generated by working on the Valletta harbours. It also discusses the necessary dynamics required to accommodate stakeholder engagement and planning policy while ensuring design quality and the perpetuation of the creative process inherent to the city. Finally, the paper introduces, as a possible future, the experiments and studies of the practice on the wider Valletta, putting into perspective the benefits of theoretical research combined with formal and aesthetic explorations of the harbour region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cities and Waterfront Infrastructure)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sustainability Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
sustainability@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Sustainability
Back to Top