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Special Issue "Eco-design and Green Chemistry"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Engineering and Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Luis M. Gandía

Institute for Advanced Materials (INAMAT), Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; structured catalytic reactors engineering; natural gas conversion; fuel processors; biofuels; hydrogen energy; chemical kinetics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applied to chemical reactors
Guest Editor
Dr. Alberto Navajas

Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute for Advanced Materials (InaMat), Public University of Navarre, Arrosadía Campus s/n, E-31006 Pamplona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable chemical engineering; heterogeneous catalysis; photo-catalysis; eco-design; life cycle assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

For many years, the chemical industry has been the engine of economic and societal development as it has served as the backbone of many industrial processes, and has helped, directly or indirectly, to fabricate most of the products that have provided a high quality of life for people. Because of this, the chemical community does have a large responsibility to assist society to move towards a significantly more-sustainable lifestyle. Eco-design, applied to chemical process industries and products, is regarded as a powerful tool in minimizing the environmental impacts of the chemical industry sector, as it allows putting into practice most of the principles of Green Chemistry and Green Chemical Process Engineering. This Special Issue aims at encouraging and highlighting research focused on redesigning chemical synthesis and processes in order to significantly improve their sustainability through the incorporation of Green Chemistry and Green Engineering principles. Papers focused on the eco-design of petrochemicals, energy conversion, and agrochemical processes are particularly welcome. Research papers devoted to the valorization of wastes, including CO2, in several ways (fuels production, chemicals synthesis, reintegration in the value chain, etc.) are also of great interest for the purposes of this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Luis M. Gandía
Dr. Alberto Navajas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Catalysis

  • CO2 utilization

  • Eco-design

  • Energy production

  • Environmental Engineering

  • Environmental Impact Minimization

  • Green Chemistry

  • Life Cycle Assessment

  • Sustainable Chemical Process Engineering

  • Wastes valorization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Application of Eco-Design and Life Cycle Assessment Standards for Environmental Impact Reduction of an Industrial Product
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1724; doi:10.3390/su9101724
Received: 5 August 2017 / Revised: 11 September 2017 / Accepted: 19 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
PDF Full-text (3224 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Eco-design is included within the framework of the standard for “Environmental management systems—Guidelines for incorporating Eco-design” (ISO 14006:2011). Eco-design process, as defined in standard, has six steps: (i) Specify product functions; (ii) Environmental assessment of products; (iii) Strategies of improvement; (iv) Environmental objectives;
[...] Read more.
Eco-design is included within the framework of the standard for “Environmental management systems—Guidelines for incorporating Eco-design” (ISO 14006:2011). Eco-design process, as defined in standard, has six steps: (i) Specify product functions; (ii) Environmental assessment of products; (iii) Strategies of improvement; (iv) Environmental objectives; (v) Product specification; and (vi) Technical solutions. Step (ii), determination of the stage or process of the product life cycle that has the highest environmental impact; this is perhaps the most controversial step because the standard does not specify which tool should be used. This lack of specification has generated some distrust with regard to eco-design, hindering its development. In order to make a trustworthy eco-design, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be applied as a tool for environmental impact quantification. The main objective of this work is to apply standardised eco-design methodology for the reduction of the environmental impact of an industrial product in Spain using LCA as a tool for the environmental product assessment. LCA standardised process (ISO 14040,14044:2006) is included in the eco-design process. A glass container intended for cough syrup delivery has been selected as an industrial product to be eco-designed. Following the methodology described, the overall normalised impact decreased 35.1% when a PET container substituted a glass container. Environmental impacts have been reduced following standardised eco-design and LCA methodologies, serving as an example to industry and administration regarding how to eco-design with the confidence of obtaining reliable results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-design and Green Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Design: A Case of Environmental and Cost Life Cycle Assessment of a Kitchen Designed for Seniors and Disabled People
Sustainability 2017, 9(8), 1329; doi:10.3390/su9081329
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 25 July 2017 / Accepted: 27 July 2017 / Published: 29 July 2017
PDF Full-text (1891 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Sustainable production and consumption patterns require a change in approach at the early conceptual stages, i.e., when planning and designing products and services. This article presents an example of sustainable kitchen design aimed at the needs of seniors and people with physical disabilities,
[...] Read more.
Sustainable production and consumption patterns require a change in approach at the early conceptual stages, i.e., when planning and designing products and services. This article presents an example of sustainable kitchen design aimed at the needs of seniors and people with physical disabilities, which takes into account social, economic, and environmental aspects. The interdisciplinary project team used a variety of traditional design methods such as the identification of requirements using QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and FMEA (Failure Mode Effects Analysis), the development and verification of the technical concepts of the designed objects and their use, the development of construction and technological documentation, assembly drawings of the product architecture and its parts, function cost analysis, virtual and real prototyping, and tools based on the concept of a life cycle such as environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The analysis of the design solutions from the point of view of several criteria and several life cycle stages shows the complexity of the decision-making process and the difficulties in selecting a clearly favourable solution. Environmentally preferred materials may be difficult for users to accept due to their costs. On the other hand, materials that have a high environmental impact at the production stage may show great potential for final disposal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-design and Green Chemistry)
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