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Special Issue "Clean Coal Technologies"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Adam Smoliński

Central Mining Institute, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +48322592252
Fax: +48322596533
Interests: energy technologies; coal and biomass gasification/co-gasification; combustion/co-combustion; cogeneration; renewable energy; hydrogen technologies; sustainable energy systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coal will remain a major energy resource due to its abundance, wide geographic distribution and price competitiveness according to the forecasts of energy use structure by 2050. The efforts of the world research community involved in clean coal technology development are aimed at the mitigation of the negative environmental impacts of coal extraction, transport and processing, and, in particular, of coal-based energy generation. The latter ones focus to a considerable extent on the development of integrated hydrogen and power generation technologies, based on coal gasification processes, as well as carbon dioxide capture and utilization methods, all contributing to the limitation of anthropogenic factors of worldwide climate change. This Special Issue is, therefore, devoted to the current challenges, and the latest developments; modeling, experimental findings and industrial implementations in all relevant disciplinary areas related to the thermochemical conversion of coal (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, liquefaction) to various products (heat, power, hydrogen, substitute natural gas, methanol, liquid fuels, etc.), co-processing of coal with renewable resources and waste, improvements and optimization of energy systems, carbon capture and utilization technologies, mitigation of contaminants emission from energy systems, as well as hydrogen production, storage and utilization as a new, clean, and environmentally-friendly energy carrier.

Prof. Adam Smoliński
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • clean coal technologies
  • combustion
  • gasification
  • pyrolysis
  • co-gasification
  • polygeneration
  • liquefaction
  • hydrogen
  • underground coal gasification
  • environmental aspects
  • heat
  • power
  • hydrogen
  • substitute natural gas
  • methanol
  • liquid fuels
  • carbon capture and utilization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Some Influences of Underground Coal Gasification on the Environment
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1512; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051512
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 10 May 2018
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Abstract
Increasing energy costs and energy demand have renewed global interest in clean coal technologies. Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is an industrial process that converts coal into product gas. UCG is a promising technology with a lot of health, safety and environmental advantages over
[...] Read more.
Increasing energy costs and energy demand have renewed global interest in clean coal technologies. Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is an industrial process that converts coal into product gas. UCG is a promising technology with a lot of health, safety and environmental advantages over conventional mining techniques. UCG carries risks to human health, agriculture and the environment. This article briefly analyzes the advantages and negative environmental impacts of UCG. It describes experimental objects, mathematical models as tools for simulation cases and it used coal from UCG experiments in Cigel, Barbara and Wieczorek mines to analyze the environmental impacts of UCG. The gasification converts the carbon in the coal to syngas and heat. We carried out a numerical simulation of the two-dimensional unstable heat conduction in the coal and overburden, with the aim of judging the influence of this heat source on the surroundings, including the surface. The results show that the temperature in the surrounding rock first increases and then decreases with time, the peak of the temperature curve decreases gradually, and its position moves inside the surrounding rock from the ignition point. A small amount of potentially dangerous syngas leaks from the UCG cavity and channels into vulnerable areas depending on working pressures. The danger of explosion and poisoning in vulnerable zones was evaluated by the simulation model. The results show that the danger is real but by monitoring and controlling the air in the vulnerable area it is possible to reduce this risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clean Coal Technologies)
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Open AccessArticle Analysis of Biomass Blend Co-Firing for Post Combustion CO2 Capture
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10040923
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 March 2018 / Published: 22 March 2018
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Abstract
The correct conduction of the CO2 capture process in coal-fired power plants with the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) requires constant process parameter monitoring and ensuring a specific flue gas chemical composition. One of the most common problems in these types of installations
[...] Read more.
The correct conduction of the CO2 capture process in coal-fired power plants with the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) requires constant process parameter monitoring and ensuring a specific flue gas chemical composition. One of the most common problems in these types of installations is the progressive corrosion and degradation of the valuable solvent. Despite the established reduction levels of oxygen and impurities entering into irreversible reactions with the absorber, the flue gas composition may change as a daily and annual function of time. The article presents a detailed analysis of the flue gas components that have the greatest influence on carbon dioxide capture installation technical safety, i.e., SOx, NOx, O2, and fly ash. The analysis was based on the results of experiments conducted at the Jaworzno III Tauron Wytwarzanie SA Polish coal power plant. The results show a significant influence of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process on MEA oxidative degradation. The amount of oxygen in flue gas during biomass and coal blend co-firing was nearly twice as low compared to pure coal combustion. Differences were also observed in the amounts of gas impurities with relation to the time of year and time of day of power plant operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clean Coal Technologies)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Assessment of Emission of Selected Gaseous Components from Coal Processing Waste Storage Site
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 744; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030744
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 2 March 2018 / Accepted: 5 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1048 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Coal mine waste dumps are often thermally active objects with exhalation zones emitting exhaust gases, both inorganic and organic, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and BTEX hydrocarbons. The genotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons make the monitoring of their emissions
[...] Read more.
Coal mine waste dumps are often thermally active objects with exhalation zones emitting exhaust gases, both inorganic and organic, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and BTEX hydrocarbons. The genotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons make the monitoring of their emissions of particular importance. In this paper, the emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from exhalation zones of selected mine waste dumps located in Poland are presented. The experimental data set was analyzed with the application of the Hierarchical Clustering Analysis. The compounds of two- and three-cyclic hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene, were quantified in the gaseous samples tested. The compounds with a greater number of aromatic rings, such as fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene were characteristic only for some of the mine waste dumps tested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clean Coal Technologies)
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