Special Issue "Attitudes about Inequalities"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Liza G. Steele

State University of New York (SUNY), Purchase, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Social policy preferences (preferences for redistribution), stratification/inequality, global/transnational sociology
Guest Editor
Dr. Nate Breznau

Mannheim Centre for European Social Research (MZES), University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: welfare state, public opinion, social policy, institutions, immigration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, stratification by income and wealth has been increasing in many parts of the world. At the same time, inequalities by race, ethnicity, nationality, immigration status, gender, and sexuality have also been in flux. Research across disciplines suggests that attitudes and public opinion play diverse roles in these processes. Although we expect public opinion to be most salient in democracies, there are cases in democracies and non-democracies alike in which these changes have reflected changes in public opinion, and others in which policy changes have diverged notably from public opinion.

For this purpose, Societies invites manuscripts of original research that examine attitudes or public opinion about inequalities pertaining to socioeconomic status, class, race, ethnicity, nationality, immigration status, gender, or sexuality, particularly as they pertain to social policies or the social welfare state. We welcome submissions using a variety of empirical methods. Regarding geographic scope, studies may be global, or specific to regions, nations, or sub-national areas; and we welcome comparative studies and those looking at changes over time.

Dr. Liza G. Steele
Dr. Nate Breznau
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Policy preferences
  • Social policy preferences
  • Preferences for redistribution
  • Stratification beliefs
  • Stratification/inequalities
  • Public opinion
  • Attitudes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Retirement Expectations in Germany—Towards Rising Social Inequality?
Societies 2018, 8(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8030050
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 9 July 2018 / Published: 10 July 2018
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Abstract
In the last 20 years, German policy makers have reformed the pension system and the labor market with the aim of prolonging working life. As a consequence, older workers’ employment rate and average retirement age rose. In addition to the actual behavior of
[...] Read more.
In the last 20 years, German policy makers have reformed the pension system and the labor market with the aim of prolonging working life. As a consequence, older workers’ employment rate and average retirement age rose. In addition to the actual behavior of today’s retiree cohorts, the reforms also influence the expected retirement age of future pensioners, the development of which will be investigated in this paper, arguing that they have adapted to the reforms and increased their expected retirement age. The analyses are based on data from the SOEP and DEAS survey and results show an increase of the expected retirement age. However, while high-skilled workers both want and expect to retire late, low-skilled workers prefer to retire early but expect that they have to work longer in order to ensure a reasonable pension. This finding hints at rising social inequality in the transition from work to retirement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Attitudes about Inequalities)
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Open AccessArticle Tax Constraints, Social Policy Preferences, and Support for Redistribution
Societies 2018, 8(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8030046
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 27 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this paper is to explore whether support for the welfare state is lower if people are made aware of its costs. Using data from a series of survey experiments in the German Internet Panel, we analyse individual spending preferences for
[...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to explore whether support for the welfare state is lower if people are made aware of its costs. Using data from a series of survey experiments in the German Internet Panel, we analyse individual spending preferences for different areas of the welfare state and support for redistribution. Tax constraints lead to lower support for unemployment benefits and for redistribution. Tax constraints do not affect support for more spending on pensions, healthcare, and long-term care. We consider whether the effect of tax constraints varies with pre-existing political attitudes or with individual material circumstances. We find little evidence that a political ideology makes respondents more responsive to tax constraints. However, we find some support that low income respondents are less responsive to the tax constraint and maintain their high support despite its costs. Attitudes towards the welfare state are not independent of attitudes towards taxation, and we conclude that our understanding of public attitudes might considerably benefit from combining these different strands of the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Attitudes about Inequalities)
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