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Special Issue "BioMEMS"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2008)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammed Zourob

Director of Biosensors division, Biophage Pharma, 6100 Royalmount, Montreal (QC), Canada H4P 2R2
E-Mail
Editorial Advisor
Dr. Vamsy Chodavarapu

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A2A7, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sensor microsystems; electrochemical sensors; optical sensors; magnetic sensors; wireless sensors; conductance/impedance/capacitance sensors; CMOS Lab-on-Chip; integrated CMOS-MEMS platforms; zero cost sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors and bioanalytical devices that are able to provide accurate detection of target analytes have always been important in the fields of medical diagnostics, food testing and environmental monitoring. Many of the available diagnostic and detection platform technologies require the operation of bulky instruments by well-trained staff and it often takes days to complete a single testing. Over the years, there are increasing needs for the development of portable, integrated biosensors that can be operated outside the laboratory by untrained personnel. These devices, once developed, will have a major impact on the applications of personal care, health, food, and environment monitoring.

Until now, other than glucose sensors and pregnancy testing strips, very few biosensors have demonstrated their success in large scale and long term operations. Encouragingly, in recent years, because of the improved understanding in genomics and proteomics and the advances in techniques of microfabrication and instrumentation, many interesting and innovative concepts and prototypes for integrated and automated bioanalytical systems have been reported.

This special issue entitled "Biosensors for Point of Care Applications" is intended to be a timely and comprehensive report on new emerging technologies that are currently being developed by research laboratories world-wide on biosensors and biomicrodevices (e.g. DNA sensor, protein sensor, glucose sensor, immunosensor, biochip, bioMEMS) with emphasis on, but limited to, point of care and point of use applications. Research papers, short communications and reviews are all welcome. In case the author is interested in submitting a review, it would be helpful to discuss with the guest-editor before your submission.

Dr. Mohammed Zourob
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • biomicrosystem
  • biochip
  • biodetection
  • Point of Care
  • DNA
  • protein

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Performance of a Diaphragmed Microlens for a Packaged Microspectrometer
Sensors 2009, 9(2), 859-868; doi:10.3390/s90200859
Received: 4 November 2008 / Revised: 9 January 2009 / Accepted: 4 February 2009 / Published: 6 February 2009
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Abstract
This paper describes the design, fabrication, packaging and testing of a microlens integrated in a multi-layered MEMS microspectrometer. The microlens was fabricated using modified PDMS molding to form a suspended lens diaphragm. Gaussian beam propagation model was used to measure the focal length
[...] Read more.
This paper describes the design, fabrication, packaging and testing of a microlens integrated in a multi-layered MEMS microspectrometer. The microlens was fabricated using modified PDMS molding to form a suspended lens diaphragm. Gaussian beam propagation model was used to measure the focal length and quantify M2 value of the microlens. A tunable calibration source was set up to measure the response of the packaged device. Dual wavelength separation by the packaged device was demonstrated by CCD imaging and beam profiling of the spectroscopic output. We demonstrated specific techniques to measure critical parameters of microoptics systems for future optimization of spectroscopic devices Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS)
Open AccessArticle A Study on Increasing Sensitivity of Rectangular Microcantilevers Used in Biosensors
Sensors 2008, 8(11), 7530-7544; doi:10.3390/s8117530
Received: 27 October 2008 / Revised: 10 November 2008 / Accepted: 10 November 2008 / Published: 25 November 2008
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (628 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study proposes a new microcantilever design with a rectangular hole at the fixed end of the cantilever that is more sensitive than conventional ones. A commercial finite element analysis software ANSYS is used to analyze it. The Stoney equation is first used
[...] Read more.
This study proposes a new microcantilever design with a rectangular hole at the fixed end of the cantilever that is more sensitive than conventional ones. A commercial finite element analysis software ANSYS is used to analyze it. The Stoney equation is first used to calculate the surface stress induced moment, and then applied to the microcantilever free end to produce deflection. The stress analysis of the proposed and conventional designs is performed, followed by dynamic analysis of the proposed design. We found that the Sader equation is more accurate than Stoney in predicting cantilever deflections, and that for increasing the sensitivity of a microcantilever biosensor increasing the cantilever thickness is more practical. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS)
Open AccessArticle Implantable Biosensors for Real-time Strain and Pressure Monitoring
Sensors 2008, 8(10), 6396-6406; doi:10.3390/s8106396
Received: 15 August 2008 / Revised: 7 October 2008 / Accepted: 10 October 2008 / Published: 15 October 2008
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (150 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Implantable biosensors were developed for real-time monitoring of pressure and strain in the human body. The sensors, which are wireless and passive, consisted of a soft magnetic material and a permanent magnet. When exposed to a low frequency AC magnetic field, the soft
[...] Read more.
Implantable biosensors were developed for real-time monitoring of pressure and strain in the human body. The sensors, which are wireless and passive, consisted of a soft magnetic material and a permanent magnet. When exposed to a low frequency AC magnetic field, the soft magnetic material generated secondary magnetic fields that also included the higher-order harmonic modes. Parameters of interest were determined by measuring the changes in the pattern of these higher-order harmonic fields, which was achieved by changing the intensity of a DC magnetic field generated by a permanent magnet. The DC magnetic field, or the biasing field, was altered by changing the separation distance between the soft magnetic material and the permanent magnet. For pressure monitoring, the permanent magnet was placed on the membrane of an airtight chamber. Changes in the ambient pressure deflected the membrane, altering the separation distance between the two magnetic elements and thus the higher-order harmonic fields. Similarly, the soft magnetic material and the permanent magnet were separated by a flexible substrate in the stress/strain sensor. Compressive and tensile forces flexed the substrate, changing the separation distance between the two elements and the higher-order harmonic fields. In the current study, both stress/strain and pressure sensors were fabricated and characterized. Good stability, linearity and repeatability of the sensors were demonstrated. This passive and wireless sensor technology may be useful for long term detection of physical quantities within the human body as a part of treatment assessment, disease diagnosis, or detection of biomedical implant failures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS)
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Review

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Open AccessReview NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies
Sensors 2008, 8(10), 6704-6726; doi:10.3390/s8106704
Received: 2 July 2008 / Revised: 27 September 2008 / Accepted: 21 October 2008 / Published: 25 October 2008
Cited by 91 | PDF Full-text (2316 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain.
[...] Read more.
Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultralong multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS)
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Open AccessReview BioMEMS –Advancing the Frontiers of Medicine
Sensors 2008, 8(9), 6077-6107; doi:10.3390/s8096077
Received: 28 August 2008 / Revised: 16 September 2008 / Accepted: 24 September 2008 / Published: 26 September 2008
Cited by 28 | PDF Full-text (549 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biological and medical application of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) is currently seen as an area of high potential impact. Integration of biology and microtechnology has resulted in the development of a number of platforms for improving biomedical and pharmaceutical technologies. This review provides a general
[...] Read more.
Biological and medical application of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) is currently seen as an area of high potential impact. Integration of biology and microtechnology has resulted in the development of a number of platforms for improving biomedical and pharmaceutical technologies. This review provides a general overview of the applications and the opportunities presented by MEMS in medicine by classifying these platforms according to their applications in the medical field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS)

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