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Special Issue "BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Cristina E. Davis

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: BioMEMS, miniature chemical sensors, chemometrics, metabolomics
Guest Editor
Dr. Reza Ehsani

Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Citrus Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, Visible-near infrared spectroscopy, Mid-infrared spectroscopy (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), Fluorescence spectroscopy, Chemometrics, Pattern recognition and classification, Fluorescence imaging, Multispectral imaging, Thermal imaging (All in agricultural production and processing)
Guest Editor
Dr. Alexander Aksenov

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
E-Mail
Interests: Mass spectrometry, MS instrumentation and applications in chemistry and biochemistry, ion mobility methods development and applications, instrumental analytical chemistry
Guest Editor
Dr. Mike Schivo

Internal Medicine: Pulmonary, Critical Care, & Sleep Medicine, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
E-Mail
Interests: noninvasive diagnostics, metabolomic analysis, biomarker discovery, airway disorders including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and airway host cell responses to infection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The “Sensors” journal calls for papers for a special issue of “BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications”. We invite papers that study novel applications of portable MEMS-based sensors in areas such as analytical chemistry, biology, agriculture and medicine. We also invite papers that generate new theoretical and empirical insights in the area of BioMEMS sensor design and manufacturing. We invite scholars from multiple disciplines, both natural sciences and engineering to this special issue. All submission will be subject to the peer-review process. We expect this special issue to contribute to significant cross-discipline idea exchange and to develop research trends in bioinstrumentation design and applications.

Prof. Dr. Cristina E. Davis
Dr. Alexander Aksenov
Dr. Mike Schivo
Dr. Reza Ehsani
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • bioMEMS;
  • MEMS manufacturing;
  • biosensors;
  • point-of-care diagnostics;
  • bioinstrumentation;
  • portable sensors;
  • analytical method development;
  • agricultural diagnostics;
  • analytical sensors

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Displaying articles 1-7
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Research

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Open AccessArticle Hybrid Modeling Method for a DEP Based Particle Manipulation
Sensors 2013, 13(2), 1730-1753; doi:10.3390/s130201730
Received: 11 November 2012 / Revised: 20 December 2012 / Accepted: 9 January 2013 / Published: 30 January 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (8686 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, a new modeling approach for Dielectrophoresis (DEP) based particle manipulation is presented. The proposed method fulfills missing links in finite element modeling between the multiphysic simulation and the biological behavior. This technique is amongst the first steps to develop a
[...] Read more.
In this paper, a new modeling approach for Dielectrophoresis (DEP) based particle manipulation is presented. The proposed method fulfills missing links in finite element modeling between the multiphysic simulation and the biological behavior. This technique is amongst the first steps to develop a more complex platform covering several types of manipulations such as magnetophoresis and optics. The modeling approach is based on a hybrid interface using both ANSYS and MATLAB to link the propagation of the electrical field in the micro-channel to the particle motion. ANSYS is used to simulate the electrical propagation while MATLAB interprets the results to calculate cell displacement and send the new information to ANSYS for another turn. The beta version of the proposed technique takes into account particle shape, weight and its electrical properties. First obtained results are coherent with experimental results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
Open AccessArticle Surface Modification on Acoustic Wave Biosensors for Enhanced Specificity
Sensors 2012, 12(9), 12317-12328; doi:10.3390/s120912317
Received: 2 July 2012 / Revised: 3 September 2012 / Accepted: 4 September 2012 / Published: 10 September 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (618 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Changes in mass loading on the surface of acoustic biosensors result in output frequency shifts which provide precise measurements of analytes. Therefore, to detect a particular biomarker, the sensor delay path must be judiciously designed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. B-cell lymphoma 2
[...] Read more.
Changes in mass loading on the surface of acoustic biosensors result in output frequency shifts which provide precise measurements of analytes. Therefore, to detect a particular biomarker, the sensor delay path must be judiciously designed to maximize sensitivity and specificity. B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (Bcl-2) found in urine is under investigation as a biomarker for non-invasive early detection of ovarian cancer. In this study, surface chemistry and biofunctionalization approaches were evaluated for their effectiveness in presenting antibodies for Bcl-2 capture while minimizing non-specific protein adsorption. The optimal combination of sequentially adsorbing protein A/G, anti-Bcl-2 IgG and Pluronic F127 onto a hydrophobic surface provided the greatest signal-to-noise ratio and enabled the reliable detection of Bcl-2 concentrations below that previously identified for early stage ovarian cancer as characterized by a modified ELISA method. Finally, the optimal surface modification was applied to a prototype acoustic device and the frequency shift for a range of Bcl-2 concentration was quantified to demonstrate the effectiveness in surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based detection applications. The surface functionalization approaches demonstrated here to specifically and sensitively detect Bcl-2 in a working ultrasonic MEMS biosensor prototype can easily be modified to detect additional biomarkers and enhance other acoustic biosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
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Open AccessArticle A Highly Miniaturized, Wireless Inertial Measurement Unit for Characterizing the Dynamics of Pitched Baseballs and Softballs
Sensors 2012, 12(9), 11933-11945; doi:10.3390/s120911933
Received: 13 June 2012 / Revised: 23 August 2012 / Accepted: 24 August 2012 / Published: 29 August 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (835 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Baseball and softball pitch types are distinguished by the path and speed of the ball which, in turn, are determined by the angular velocity of the ball and the velocity of the ball center at the instant of release from the pitcher’s hand.
[...] Read more.
Baseball and softball pitch types are distinguished by the path and speed of the ball which, in turn, are determined by the angular velocity of the ball and the velocity of the ball center at the instant of release from the pitcher’s hand. While radar guns and video-based motion capture (mocap) resolve ball speed, they provide little information about how the angular velocity of the ball and the velocity of the ball center develop and change during the throwing motion. Moreover, mocap requires measurements in a controlled lab environment and by a skilled technician. This study addresses these shortcomings by introducing a highly miniaturized, wireless inertial measurement unit (IMU) that is embedded in both baseballs and softballs. The resulting “ball-embedded” sensor resolves ball dynamics right on the field of play. Experimental results from ten pitches, five thrown by one softball pitcher and five by one baseball pitcher, demonstrate that this sensor technology can deduce the magnitude and direction of the ball’s velocity at release to within 4.6% of measurements made using standard mocap. Moreover, the IMU directly measures the angular velocity of the ball, which further enables the analysis of different pitch types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
Open AccessArticle A Low-Cost, Portable, High-Throughput Wireless Sensor System for Phonocardiography Applications
Sensors 2012, 12(8), 10851-10870; doi:10.3390/s120810851
Received: 2 July 2012 / Revised: 27 July 2012 / Accepted: 30 July 2012 / Published: 7 August 2012
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1006 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents the design and testing of a wireless sensor system developed using a Microchip PICDEM developer kit to acquire and monitor human heart sounds for phonocardiography applications. This system can serve as a cost-effective option to the recent developments in wireless
[...] Read more.
This paper presents the design and testing of a wireless sensor system developed using a Microchip PICDEM developer kit to acquire and monitor human heart sounds for phonocardiography applications. This system can serve as a cost-effective option to the recent developments in wireless phonocardiography sensors that have primarily focused on Bluetooth technology. This wireless sensor system has been designed and developed in-house using off-the-shelf components and open source software for remote and mobile applications. The small form factor (3.75 cm ´ 5 cm ´ 1 cm), high throughput (6,000 Hz data streaming rate), and low cost ($13 per unit for a 1,000 unit batch) of this wireless sensor system make it particularly attractive for phonocardiography and other sensing applications. The experimental results of sensor signal analysis using several signal characterization techniques suggest that this wireless sensor system can capture both fundamental heart sounds (S1 and S2), and is also capable of capturing abnormal heart sounds (S3 and S4) and heart murmurs without aliasing. The results of a denoising application using Wavelet Transform show that the undesirable noises of sensor signals in the surrounding environment can be reduced dramatically. The exercising experiment results also show that this proposed wireless PCG system can capture heart sounds over different heart conditions simulated by varying heart rates of six subjects over a range of 60–180 Hz through exercise testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
Open AccessArticle An Oxidase-Based Electrochemical Fluidic Sensor with High-Sensitivity and Low-Interference by On-Chip Oxygen Manipulation
Sensors 2012, 12(7), 8955-8965; doi:10.3390/s120708955
Received: 28 May 2012 / Revised: 20 June 2012 / Accepted: 21 June 2012 / Published: 29 June 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1227 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a
[...] Read more.
Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a simple mechanical procedure of manipulating bubbles was developed to maximize the oxygen level while minimizing the pH change after electrolysis. The sensors show improved sensitivities based on the oxygen dependency of enzyme reaction. In addition, this oxygen-rich operation minimizes the ratio of electrochemical interference signal by ascorbic acid during sensor operation (i.e., amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide). Although creatinine sensors have been used as the model system in this study, this method is applicable to many other biosensors that can use oxidase enzymes (e.g., glucose, alcohol, phenol, etc.) to implement a viable component for in-line fluidic sensor systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
Open AccessArticle A Urinary Bcl-2 Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor for Early Ovarian Cancer Detection
Sensors 2012, 12(6), 7423-7437; doi:10.3390/s120607423
Received: 31 March 2012 / Revised: 22 May 2012 / Accepted: 28 May 2012 / Published: 31 May 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (1112 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the design, fabrication, surface functionalization and experimental characterization of an ultrasonic MEMS biosensor for urinary anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) detection with sub ng/mL sensitivity is presented. It was previously shown that urinary Bcl-2 levels are reliably elevated during
[...] Read more.
In this study, the design, fabrication, surface functionalization and experimental characterization of an ultrasonic MEMS biosensor for urinary anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) detection with sub ng/mL sensitivity is presented. It was previously shown that urinary Bcl-2 levels are reliably elevated during early and late stages of ovarian cancer. Our biosensor uses shear horizontal (SH) surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on surface functionalized ST-cut Quartz to quantify the mass loading change by protein adhesion to the delay path. SH-SAWs were generated and received by a pair of micro-fabricated interdigital transducers (IDTs) separated by a judiciously designed delay path. The delay path was surface-functionalized with monoclonal antibodies, ODMS, Protein A/G and Pluronic F127 for optimal Bcl-2 capture with minimal non-specific adsorption. Bcl-2 concentrations were quantified by the resulting resonance frequency shift detected by a custom designed resonator circuit. The target sensitivity for diagnosis and identifying the stage of ovarian cancer was successfully achieved with demonstrated Bcl-2 detection capability of 500 pg/mL. It was also shown that resonance frequency shift increases linearly with increasing Bcl-2 concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Bio-Inspired Polarized Skylight-Based Navigation Sensors: A Review
Sensors 2012, 12(11), 14232-14261; doi:10.3390/s121114232
Received: 5 September 2012 / Revised: 15 October 2012 / Accepted: 15 October 2012 / Published: 24 October 2012
Cited by 27 | PDF Full-text (529 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Animal senses cover a broad range of signal types and signal bandwidths and have inspired various sensors and bioinstrumentation devices for biological and medical applications. Insects, such as desert ants and honeybees, for example, utilize polarized skylight pattern-based information in their navigation activities.
[...] Read more.
Animal senses cover a broad range of signal types and signal bandwidths and have inspired various sensors and bioinstrumentation devices for biological and medical applications. Insects, such as desert ants and honeybees, for example, utilize polarized skylight pattern-based information in their navigation activities. They reliably return to their nests and hives from places many kilometers away. The insect navigation system involves the dorsal rim area in their compound eyes and the corresponding polarization sensitive neurons in the brain. The dorsal rim area is equipped with photoreceptors, which have orthogonally arranged small hair-like structures termed microvilli. These are the specialized sensors for the detection of polarized skylight patterns (e-vector orientation). Various research groups have been working on the development of novel navigation systems inspired by polarized skylight-based navigation in animals. Their major contributions are critically reviewed. One focus of current research activities is on imitating the integration path mechanism in desert ants. The potential for simple, high performance miniaturized bioinstrumentation that can assist people in navigation will be explored. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BioMEMS and Advanced Analytical Sensors for Biological Applications)
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