Special Issue "Medical Robotics and Systems"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Robotics (ISSN 2218-6581).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Abhilash Pandya (Website)

Computer Assisted Robot Enhances Systems Lab, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 3129 Engineering Building, 5050 Anthony Wayne Dr., Detroit, MI 48202, USA
Interests: medical robotics; rehabilitation robotics; biomedical signal processing; learning and classification algorithms; robot vision: augmented and virtual reality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We predict that technology assisted medicine (and robotics in particular) will have a significant impact over the next few decades. While already utilized in areas such as Cardiac surgery, Urology, Fetal Surgery, Pediatrics, Neurosurgery, Orthopedics and many other medical disciplines, robots will augment the surgeon’s senses (e.g., with haptics (feel), augmented reality (sight), ultrasound (sensing), etc.), motor performance and diagnosis capability.

Even with enormous technological gains, robotic surgery is still at its infancy. There are some major areas of technological improvement needed for this technology to reach its ultimate potential which include better visualization, tactile sensing, diagnostic sensing, human robot interfaces, and miniaturization among others.

Prof. Dr. Abhilash Pandya
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (N.B. Conference papers may only be submitted if the paper was not originally copyrighted and if it has been extended substantially and completely re-written). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Robotics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

This special issue will focus on the latest advancements in robotic surgery and its associated leveraging areas. The main topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Training/Simulation
    • Design/validation/efficacy
    • Simulation of procedures
    • Physical modeling
  • Human factors
    • Robot-computer interfaces
    • Capturing Surgeon intentions
  • Visualization
    • Augmented and Virtual reality
    • Image Guidance/Virtual rails
    • Imaging devices image
    • data fusion
  • Robotic/Sensor Integration
    • Haptics
    • Abnormality (e.g., Cancer) detection sensors
    • Multi-modal sensor fusion
  • Novel robotic designs/procedures
    • Surgical Automation
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Micro/Nano technologies
    • Clinical applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Open AccessReview A Review of Camera Viewpoint Automation in Robotic and Laparoscopic Surgery
Robotics 2014, 3(3), 310-329; doi:10.3390/robotics3030310
Received: 1 May 2014 / Revised: 18 July 2014 / Accepted: 19 July 2014 / Published: 14 August 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (342 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Complex teleoperative tasks, such as surgery, generally require human control. However, teleoperating a robot using indirect visual information poses many technical challenges because the user is expected to control the movement(s) of the camera(s) in addition to the robot’s arms and other [...] Read more.
Complex teleoperative tasks, such as surgery, generally require human control. However, teleoperating a robot using indirect visual information poses many technical challenges because the user is expected to control the movement(s) of the camera(s) in addition to the robot’s arms and other elements. For humans, camera positioning is difficult, error-prone, and a drain on the user’s available resources and attention. This paper reviews the state of the art of autonomous camera control with a focus on surgical applications. We also propose potential avenues of research in this field that will support the transition from direct slaved control to truly autonomous robotic camera systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Robotics and Systems)
Open AccessReview The Role of Indocyanine Green for Robotic Partial Nephrectomy: Early Results, Limitations and Future Directions
Robotics 2014, 3(3), 281-288; doi:10.3390/robotics3030281
Received: 27 February 2014 / Revised: 30 June 2014 / Accepted: 9 July 2014 / Published: 16 July 2014
PDF Full-text (281 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The surgical management of small renal masses has continued to evolve, particularly with the advent of the robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN). Recent studies at high volume institutions utilizing near infrared imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent dye to delineate renal tumor anatomy [...] Read more.
The surgical management of small renal masses has continued to evolve, particularly with the advent of the robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN). Recent studies at high volume institutions utilizing near infrared imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent dye to delineate renal tumor anatomy has generated interest among robotic surgeons for improving warm ischemia times and positive margin rate for RPN. To date, early studies suggest positive margin rate using ICG is comparable to traditional RPN, however this technology improves visualization of the renal vasculature allowing selective clamping or zero ischemia. The precise combination of fluorescent compound, dose, and optimal tumor anatomy for ICG RPN has yet to be elucidated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Robotics and Systems)
Open AccessReview Recent Trends in Lower-Limb Robotic Rehabilitation Orthosis: Control Scheme and Strategy for Pneumatic Muscle Actuated Gait Trainers
Robotics 2014, 3(2), 120-148; doi:10.3390/robotics3020120
Received: 10 January 2014 / Revised: 17 March 2014 / Accepted: 21 March 2014 / Published: 14 April 2014
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (932 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is a general assumption that pneumatic muscle-type actuators will play an important role in the development of an assistive rehabilitation robotics system. In the last decade, the development of a pneumatic muscle actuated lower-limb leg orthosis has been rather slow compared [...] Read more.
It is a general assumption that pneumatic muscle-type actuators will play an important role in the development of an assistive rehabilitation robotics system. In the last decade, the development of a pneumatic muscle actuated lower-limb leg orthosis has been rather slow compared to other types of actuated leg orthoses that use AC motors, DC motors, pneumatic cylinders, linear actuators, series elastic actuators (SEA) and brushless servomotors. However, recent years have shown that the interest in this field has grown exponentially, mainly due to the demand for a more compliant and interactive human-robotics system. This paper presents a survey of existing lower-limb leg orthoses for rehabilitation, which implement pneumatic muscle-type actuators, such as McKibben artificial muscles, rubbertuators, air muscles, pneumatic artificial muscles (PAM) or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMA). It reviews all the currently existing lower-limb rehabilitation orthosis systems in terms of comparison and evaluation of the design, as well as the control scheme and strategy, with the aim of clarifying the current and on-going research in the lower-limb robotic rehabilitation field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Robotics and Systems)
Open AccessReview Robots in Health and Social Care: A Complementary Technology to Home Care and Telehealthcare?
Robotics 2014, 3(1), 1-21; doi:10.3390/robotics3010001
Received: 1 November 2013 / Revised: 17 December 2013 / Accepted: 18 December 2013 / Published: 30 December 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (489 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article offers a brief overview of most current and potential uses and applications of robotics in health/care and social care, whether commercially ready and available on the market or still at the various stages of research and prototyping. We provide carefully [...] Read more.
This article offers a brief overview of most current and potential uses and applications of robotics in health/care and social care, whether commercially ready and available on the market or still at the various stages of research and prototyping. We provide carefully hand-picked examples and pointers to on-going research for each set of identified robotics applications and then discuss the main ingredients for the success of these applications, as well as the main issues surrounding their adoption for everyday use, including sustainability in non-technical environments, patient/user safety and acceptance, ethical considerations such as patient/user privacy, and cost effectiveness. We examine how robotics could (partially) fill in some of the identified gaps in current telehealthcare and home care/self-care provisions. The article concludes with a brief glimpse at a couple of emerging developments and promising applications in the field (soft robots and robots for disaster response) that are expected to play important roles in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Robotics and Systems)
Open AccessReview Robotics in Endometrial Cancer Care
Robotics 2013, 2(4), 198-202; doi:10.3390/robotics2040198
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 4 November 2013 / Accepted: 6 November 2013 / Published: 12 November 2013
PDF Full-text (150 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in women in most of the developed world. The majority of these women with endometrial cancer will be unaffected by their disease. The challenge therefore is for surgical treatment not to be worse than [...] Read more.
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer in women in most of the developed world. The majority of these women with endometrial cancer will be unaffected by their disease. The challenge therefore is for surgical treatment not to be worse than the disease. Robotics has changed the way that we care for women living with endometrial cancer by making low-impact surgical treatment available to more women than was previously possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medical Robotics and Systems)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Robotics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
robotics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Robotics
Back to Top