Special Issue "Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection: African Thought, Critical Theory, and Liberation Theology in Dialogue"

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Justin Sands

School of Philosophy, North-West University Potchefstroom, Potchefstroom, South Africa
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Interests: continental philosophy of religion; fundamental theology; metaphysics; cultural studies
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anné Hendrik Verhoef

School of Philosophy, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Philosophy of Religion; Metaphysics; Transcendence; Paul Ricoeur; Happiness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The special issue of Religions, entitled “Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection: African Thought, Critical Theory, and Liberation Theology in Dialogue”, aims to provide a platform for scholars to engage questions regarding the relationship between colonialism, capitalism, and culture through both a philosophical and theological lens. The impetus for this special issue was born out of an international conference held by the Transforming Encounters research group at North West University in South Africa, where scholars from various fields joined in conversation to explore the complex relationship between the West’s pervasive (capitalistic) culture and epistemologies, and the current postcolonial context of Southern Africa as its people attempt to wrestle with emerging through colonialism.

A key theme that has arisen from within current academic and cultural debates within Southern African societies involve an intersection of (1) decolonial and postmodern critique, (2) the impact of the global, capitalist economy on Southern Africans, and (3) the appropriation of ideas and concepts within Western modernity and its subsequent metaphysical tradition in order to open a space for heretofore silenced voices to speak. This special issue’s motivation is to further this discovery by bringing together international experts on these issues who will collectively deepen our understanding of this intersectionality.

We hereby invite papers regarding these aforementioned issues of intersectionality, particularly in accord with African philosophy and decolonial critique, critical theory, and liberation theology. To have your paper considered, please submit a title an abstract of 500 words maximum, along with a short CV, to anne.verhoef@nwu.ac.za or justin.sands@nwu.ac.za before December 1, 2017. Although this is an open call, preference will be given to those who attended the initial conference.

This special issue was made possible by a “Knowledge, Interchange, and Collaboration” grant given by the National Research Foundation of South Africa, which funded the “Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection” conference. Disclaimer: Any opinion, finding and conclusion or recommendation expressed in this material is that of the author(s) and the National Research Foundation does not accept any liability in this regard.

Thanks

Dr. Justin Sands
Prof. Dr. Anné Hendrik Verhoef
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • African Thought
  • African Philosophy
  • Critical Theory
  • Liberation Theology
  • Contextual Theology
  • Decolonization
  • Postcolonial Studies
  • Transformation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Encountering Transcendence: Žižek, Liberation Theology and African Thought in Dialogue
Religions 2017, 8(12), 271; doi:10.3390/rel8120271
Received: 21 October 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
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Abstract
The concept of transcendence has been described by various academic disciplines like philosophy, theology, art and literature, but also by various religions and cultures. This has also been the case with the three traditions that are brought into dialogue in this special issue,
[...] Read more.
The concept of transcendence has been described by various academic disciplines like philosophy, theology, art and literature, but also by various religions and cultures. This has also been the case with the three traditions that are brought into dialogue in this special issue, namely critical theory, African thought and Liberation theology. In this article I will focus on transcendence as it is ‘encountered’ by the philosopher Slavoj Žižek as a postmetaphysical thinker and as a voice from critical theory. Žižek’s emphasis on the ‘gap in immanence’ and its implications for freedom will then be brought into dialogue with African thought and Liberation theology. Transcendence as an entry point in this dialogue has the potential not only to give more insight into these traditions, but also to advance the concept of freedom, which is central in all these traditions. Full article
Open AccessArticle From Contextual Theology to African Christianity: The Consideration of Adiaphora from a South African Perspective
Religions 2017, 8(12), 266; doi:10.3390/rel8120266
Received: 7 November 2017 / Revised: 4 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 8 December 2017
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Abstract
The move towards contextual Christianity in Africa is an essential venture if Christianity is to communicate with the African cultural heritage. As a universal religion, Christianity has to find an expression within the cultural context. However, the contextualization of Christianity in Africa appears
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The move towards contextual Christianity in Africa is an essential venture if Christianity is to communicate with the African cultural heritage. As a universal religion, Christianity has to find an expression within the cultural context. However, the contextualization of Christianity in Africa appears to have permitted the practice of syncretism. It has resulted in the emergence of African Christianity, which is the amalgamation of Christianity and African Traditional Religion. The amalgamation of Christianity and African Traditional Religion appears to overlook the essence of both religions as there is currently no clarity on how Christianity can best be expressed within the African cultural and religious heritage. This paper employs the document review method to explore the things that fall in between—“adiaphora”, which the proponents of contextual Christianity may have overlooked with regard to the African cultural and religious heritage. These include the pragmatic nature of the African cultural and religious heritage, and the African traditional methods of healing. Full article
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