E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Christian Psychology: Past, Present, and Future"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Religions (ISSN 2077-1444).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Eric L Johnson

Lawrence and Charlotte Hoover Professor of Pastoral Care, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, PO Box 2381, 2825 Lexington Rd, Louisville, KY 40280, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 502-897-4223
Interests: Christian psychotherapy and developmental psychology; attribution theory; philosophy of the human sciences; transdisciplinary scholarship

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

When most people today think of psychology, they have in mind the version that arose in the late 1800’s, based on the worldview of naturalism and the application of natural science methods to the study of human experience and behavior, which became the dominant approach to psychology in the West in the 20th century. However, every complex culture in human history has developed some version of psychology, considered as a body of knowledge and practice concerned with understanding individual human beings and promoting their wellbeing. In the centuries since its founding, the Christian community has developed a rich and distinctive body of knowledge and practice that warrants the label Christian psychology.
Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1854), for example, described himself as a Christian psychologist, wrote penetrating analyses of the human condition, and developed a number of significant existential/critical psychological models of the emotions, motivation, human flourishing, the unconscious, stage development, abnormality, and remediation, from a distinctly Christian perspective—before Freud was even born—that differ in significant ways from those of modern psychology.
A renewal of interest in Christian psychology began two to three decades ago in Europe and the USA, inspired in some cases by the charismatic movement and in others by the resurgence of Christian philosophy. Contemporary Christian psychology, therefore, is in its infancy. In dialogue with other versions of psychology, the agenda of a Christian psychology is the development of distinctively Christian psychological theory, research programs, and clinical practice, based on a Christian worldview and derived from Christianity’s many intellectual and soul-care traditions, in areas of psychology where worldview assumptions appear to make a difference in the deliverances of scientific activity.

Prof. Dr. Eric L. Johnson
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Religions is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • history of psychology
  • philosophy of science
  • religion
  • spirituality
  • theistic psychology
  • folk psychology
  • worldview

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Redeeming Emotion-Focused Therapy: A Christian Analysis of Its Worldview, Epistemology, and Emphasis
Religions 2014, 5(1), 323-333; doi:10.3390/rel5010323
Received: 7 December 2013 / Revised: 28 February 2014 / Accepted: 3 March 2014 / Published: 10 March 2014
PDF Full-text (74 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While emotion-focused therapy (EFT) offers clinically useful information to Christian practitioners, its underlying worldview, epistemology, and emphasis present challenges for Christian therapists. This article advocates that Christian practitioners can redeem EFT for Christ by evaluating and translating these presuppositions in light of Christian
[...] Read more.
While emotion-focused therapy (EFT) offers clinically useful information to Christian practitioners, its underlying worldview, epistemology, and emphasis present challenges for Christian therapists. This article advocates that Christian practitioners can redeem EFT for Christ by evaluating and translating these presuppositions in light of Christian alternatives. In offering these alternatives, the article encourages the creation of a distinctively Christian emotion-focused therapy (CEFT). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Christian Psychology: Past, Present, and Future)
Open AccessArticle Becoming Ourselves: Anthropological Musings for Christian Psychologists
Religions 2014, 5(1), 268-276; doi:10.3390/rel5010268
Received: 6 December 2013 / Revised: 7 February 2014 / Accepted: 17 February 2014 / Published: 3 March 2014
PDF Full-text (63 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A Christian narrative of the self provides a critique of a contemporary highly ennobled therapeutic and individualistic understanding of the self. Within a Christian anthropological narrative, the self is ennobled not in and of itself, but by virtue of its union with God.
[...] Read more.
A Christian narrative of the self provides a critique of a contemporary highly ennobled therapeutic and individualistic understanding of the self. Within a Christian anthropological narrative, the self is ennobled not in and of itself, but by virtue of its union with God. This leads theologians, both ancient and contemporary, to speak boldly about becoming fully human, and even more, becoming God. Herein, this Christian story of the self is explored, with implications for Christian psychology and its dialogue with other psychological perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Christian Psychology: Past, Present, and Future)
Open AccessArticle Theodramatic Rehearsal: Fighting Self-Deception through the Dramatic Imagination
Religions 2014, 5(1), 304-320; doi:10.3390/rel5010304
Received: 20 December 2013 / Revised: 31 January 2014 / Accepted: 17 February 2014 / Published: 3 March 2014
PDF Full-text (110 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper seeks to appropriate the insights of dramatic theology for Christian psychology and soul care. According to Kevin Vanhoozer, Scripture is the ‘script’ for human beings’ fitting participation in the acts and deeds of God in the world (i.e., ‘theodrama’).
[...] Read more.
This paper seeks to appropriate the insights of dramatic theology for Christian psychology and soul care. According to Kevin Vanhoozer, Scripture is the ‘script’ for human beings’ fitting participation in the acts and deeds of God in the world (i.e., ‘theodrama’). Keeping with this dramatic paradigm, the author will explore what ‘rehearsal’ might entail by drawing from a branch of psychotherapy called ‘psychodrama.’ The main question to be addressed in this appropriation of dramatic theology is, “How might dramatic rehearsal combat self-deception?” The author will only begin to answer this question, but in the attempt it is hoped that further reflection and clarity will be induced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Christian Psychology: Past, Present, and Future)
Open AccessArticle Varieties of Quest and the Religious Openness Hypothesis within Religious Fundamentalist and Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surrounds
Religions 2014, 5(1), 1-20; doi:10.3390/rel5010001
Received: 10 November 2013 / Revised: 11 December 2013 / Accepted: 13 December 2013 / Published: 24 December 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (223 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
According to the Religious Openness Hypothesis, the religious and psychological openness of American Christians is obscured by a defensive ghettoization of thought associated with a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround and can be discovered instead within a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround. A test of
[...] Read more.
According to the Religious Openness Hypothesis, the religious and psychological openness of American Christians is obscured by a defensive ghettoization of thought associated with a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround and can be discovered instead within a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround. A test of this claim examined Religious Fundamentalism, Biblical Foundationalism, Quest, and Multidimensional Quest Scales in 432 undergraduates. Christian Religious Reflection, Religious Schema, and Religious Orientation measures clarified these two ideological surrounds. Partial correlations controlling for Biblical Foundationalism described a Religious Fundamentalist Ideological Surround that more strongly rejected Quest and that more generally displayed a failure to integrate faith with intellect. Partial correlations controlling for Religious Fundamentalism revealed a Biblical Foundationalist Ideological Surround that was more open to Quest and that offered numerous demonstrations of an ability to unite faith with intellect. These data supplemented previous investigations in demonstrating that Christianity and other traditional religions have ideological resources for promoting a faithful intellect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Christian Psychology: Past, Present, and Future)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Religions Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
religions@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Religions
Back to Top