Special Issue "Medication Adherence"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Debi Bhattacharya

School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norfolk, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: development and validation of medication adherence interventions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medication non-adherence is described by the World Health Organisation as a “worldwide problem of striking magnitude”.  Adhering to prescribed medication directions is a complex health behaviour potentially presenting numerous challenges to the patient.  The research challenges include generating evidence to support practitioners in accurately identifying patients who are non-adherent, determining the reason(s) for the non-adherence and then working with the patient to develop appropriate solution(s).

We invite you to share your research regarding medication adherence, which may be from any point along the process of intervention development ranging from theory and evidence base generation through to feasibility/piloting, evaluation and implementation.

Dr. Debi Bhattacharya
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • Complex interventions
  • Process evaluation
  • Evidence syntheses
  • Trials
  • Brief interventions
  • Disease focused adherence interventions
  • Adherence measurement
  • Outcome measures
  • Medication review

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Validation and Feasibility of the Medication Acceptability Questionnaire to Investigate Tablet and Liquid Alendronic Acid with Older Hospital Patients
Received: 17 May 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 9 August 2018 / Published: 11 August 2018
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Abstract
The effects of formulation characteristics on acceptability are poorly understood. This study evaluated the validity and feasibility of using the Medication Acceptability Questionnaire (MAQ) to investigate factors influencing acceptability of tablet compared with liquid alendronic acid. Written consent was obtained from eligible patients
[...] Read more.
The effects of formulation characteristics on acceptability are poorly understood. This study evaluated the validity and feasibility of using the Medication Acceptability Questionnaire (MAQ) to investigate factors influencing acceptability of tablet compared with liquid alendronic acid. Written consent was obtained from eligible patients on Older People’s Medicine wards. MAQ face and content validity were evaluated through cognitive interviews while internal consistency and criterion validity were investigated by calculating Cronbach’s alpha and correlation of MAQ items with visual analogue scale (VAS) responses. MAQ data were obtained from 33 and 25 participants for tablet and liquid formulations respectively. Cognitive interviews indicated MAQ face and content validity. The domains of appearance, efficacy, and tolerability demonstrated adequate internal consistency and suitable refinements were identified for the domains of convenience and taste with Cronbach’s alpha <0.7. Significant positive correlations were identified between all MAQ domains and VAS. The liquid trended towards performing better for taste, appearance and tolerability and the tablet for convenience and efficacy. It is feasible to capture patient acceptability of a medication by questionnaire. Interpatient variation in acceptability for two formulations indicates that medication characteristics should be considered during prescribing and medication reviews to match patient preference with the appropriate formulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Adherence)
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Open AccessArticle Young Muslim Women Living with Asthma in Denmark: A Link between Religion and Self-Efficacy
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that can be controlled with appropriate medicinal treatment. Adherence to pharmacological treatment is therefore critical. Self-efficacy plays a key role in adherence to medicine in chronic diseases, including asthma. Additionally, ethnic minorities have poor adherence to medicines.
[...] Read more.
Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that can be controlled with appropriate medicinal treatment. Adherence to pharmacological treatment is therefore critical. Self-efficacy plays a key role in adherence to medicine in chronic diseases, including asthma. Additionally, ethnic minorities have poor adherence to medicines. However, the impact of religion on self-efficacy and adherence is understudied. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the role of self-efficacy in adherence to asthma medicine treatment and the influence of religion on self-efficacy among young, Muslim minority women. A focus group and individual interviews with 10 Muslim minority women (14–24 years of age) living in Denmark were conducted. Data analysis was deductive using Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy and modes of agency. Overall, religion was shown to affect self-efficacy. The women reported changes in self-perceived self-efficacy during the holy month of Ramadan. In addition, praying was used as an alternative to medicine for controlling asthma symptoms. However, the women did not perceive religion and treating asthma with medicine as mutually exclusive, but rather as coexisting for the shared goal of controlling asthma symptoms. It is important for healthcare professionals (HCPs) to be aware of the link between self-efficacy, religion and adherence to asthma medicine treatment. This awareness can aid HCPs in giving advice regarding adherence to asthma treatment, and when monitoring treatment to improve the quality of asthma care for young Muslim minority women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Adherence)
Open AccessArticle Managing Complexity: Exploring Decision Making on Medication by Young Adults with ADHD
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 16 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 19 April 2018
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Abstract
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) causes difficulties with hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. Treatment of ADHD includes both medication and non-pharmacological options. Knowledge of treatment preferences by young adults with ADHD is sparse. The objective of this study was to explore the beliefs and experiences
[...] Read more.
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) causes difficulties with hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. Treatment of ADHD includes both medication and non-pharmacological options. Knowledge of treatment preferences by young adults with ADHD is sparse. The objective of this study was to explore the beliefs and experiences of young adults with ADHD related to their medication treatment decisions. Data were collected in Denmark in 2016 through a focus group and individual in-depth interviews. Conventional content analysis was used. Ten young adults with ADHD (22-to 29-year-old) participated. Three major themes were identified: (1) the patient’s right to choose concerning ADHD medicine; (2) the patient’s decision of whether or not to treat ADHD with medication; and (3) factors affecting the patient’s decision on whether to take ADHD medication or not. The latter theme contained 15 factors, which were distributed across three levels: individual, between-individuals, and societal. The dominant factors were increasing quality of life and improving oneself e.g., improving social skills. For counselling at the pharmacy and by prescribers, it is important to be aware of the different factors that affect young adult patients’ decisions on whether to take ADHD medication or not. This knowledge will aid to understand reasons for non-adherence and to determine appropriate treatment for the individual patient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Adherence)
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