Special Issue "Graphite, Graphene, Advanced Carbon Materials and Nanostructured Carbon-Based Composites and Selected Papers from Carbon 2018"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Isabel Suelves

Grupo de Conversión de Combustibles/Fuels Conversion Group, Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: production of H2 and nanocarbons by catalytic decomposition (CD) of hydrocarbons; search for applications of the nanocarbons: CNF/MWCNTs from CD, synthetic graphite obtained by their heat treatment, graphene materials obtained by CNF/MWCNT unzipping and inorganic/nanocarbon hybrid materials; the applications include their use as additive in composites, as anode in Li and Na-ion batteries and as catalytic supports for advanced heavy oil upgrading and bio-oils hydrotreating
Guest Editor
Dr. Marcos Granda

Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: materials chemistry; materials; nanomaterials; composites; material characteristics; graphene; preparation and characterization of carbon precursors from coal and petroleum derivatives; design of carbon materials (e.g. fibers, composites, graphene, etc.) for structural and energy storage applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The World Conference on Carbon (Carbon 2018) will take place in Madrid (Spain), July 1–6, 2018. The conference aims to provide an innovative and comprehensive overview of the latest research developments on carbon science and applications. This Special Issue will contain accepted papers presented during Carbon 2018, related to graphene and graphite, advanced carbon materials: Nanotubes, fullerenes, carbon fibers and carbon-based composites. The selected papers could include, not only the carbon materials preparation, modification, characterization and properties, but also relevant applications in the fields of energy conversion and storage, catalysis, medicine and biology, among others.

Dr. Isabel Suelves
Dr. Marcos Granda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Graphite
  • Graphene
  • Advanced Carbon Materials
  • Nanotubes
  • Fullerenes
  • Carbon fibres
  • Carbon based composites

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Palm Kernel Shell Activated Carbon as an Inorganic Framework for Shape-Stabilized Phase Change Material
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(9), 689; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8090689
Received: 26 July 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 30 August 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
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Abstract
The preparation of activated carbon using palm kernel shells as the precursor (PKSAC) was successfully accomplished after the parametric optimization of the carbonization temperature, carbonization holding time, and the ratio of the activator (H3PO4) to the precursor. Optimization at
[...] Read more.
The preparation of activated carbon using palm kernel shells as the precursor (PKSAC) was successfully accomplished after the parametric optimization of the carbonization temperature, carbonization holding time, and the ratio of the activator (H3PO4) to the precursor. Optimization at 500 °C for 2 h of carbonization with 20% H3PO4 resulted in the highest surface area of the activated carbon (C20) of 1169 m2 g−1 and, with an average pore size of 27 Å. Subsequently, the preparation of shape-stabilized phase change material (SSPCM-C20) was done by the encapsulation of n-octadecane into the pores of the PKSAC, C20. The field emission scanning electron microscope images and the nitrogen gas adsorption-desorption isotherms show that n-octadecane was successfully encapsulated into the pores of C20. The resulting SSPCM-C20 nano-composite shows good thermal reliability which is chemically and thermally stable and can stand up to 500 melting and freezing cycles. This research work provided a new strategy for the preparation of SSPCM material for thermal energy storage application generated from oil palm waste. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Basic Medium Heterogeneous Solution Synthesis of α-MnO2 Nanoflakes as an Anode or Cathode in Half Cell Configuration (vs. Lithium) of Li-Ion Batteries
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 608; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080608
Received: 18 July 2018 / Revised: 4 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
Nano α-MnO2 is usually synthesized under hydrothermal conditions in acidic medium, which results in materials easily undergoing thermal reduction and offers single crystals often over 100 nm in size. In this study, α-MnO2 built up of inter-grown ultra-small nanoflakes with 10
[...] Read more.
Nano α-MnO2 is usually synthesized under hydrothermal conditions in acidic medium, which results in materials easily undergoing thermal reduction and offers single crystals often over 100 nm in size. In this study, α-MnO2 built up of inter-grown ultra-small nanoflakes with 10 nm thickness was produced in a rapid two-step procedure starting via partial reduction in solution in basic medium subsequently followed by co-proportionation in thermal treatment. This approach offers phase-pure α-MnO2 doped with potassium (cryptomelane type K0.25Mn8O16 structure) demonstrating considerable chemical and thermal stability. The reaction pathways leading to this new morphology and structure have been discussed. The MnO2 electrodes produced from obtained nanostructures were tested as electrodes of lithium ion batteries delivering initial discharge capacities of 968 mAh g−1 for anode (0 to 2.0 V) and 317 mAh g−1 for cathode (1.5 to 3.5 V) at 20 mA g−1 current density. At constant current of 100 mA g−1, stable cycling of anode achieving 660 mAh g−1 and 145 mAh g−1 for cathode after 200 cycles is recorded. Post diagnostic analysis of cycled electrodes confirmed the electrode materials stability and structural properties. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Fabrication and Characterization of Graphene Microcrystal Prepared from Lignin Refined from Sugarcane Bagasse
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(8), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8080565
Received: 23 June 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
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Abstract
Graphene microcrystal (GMC) is a type of glassy carbon fabricated from lignin, in which the microcrystals of graphene are chemically bonded by sp3 carbon atoms, forming a glass-like microcrystal structure. The lignin is refined from sugarcane bagasse using an ethanol-based organosolv technique
[...] Read more.
Graphene microcrystal (GMC) is a type of glassy carbon fabricated from lignin, in which the microcrystals of graphene are chemically bonded by sp3 carbon atoms, forming a glass-like microcrystal structure. The lignin is refined from sugarcane bagasse using an ethanol-based organosolv technique which is used for the fabrication of GMC by two technical schemes: The pyrolysis reaction of lignin in a tubular furnace at atmospheric pressure; and the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of lignin at lower temperature, followed by pyrolysis at higher temperature. The existence of graphene nanofragments in GMC is proven by Raman spectra and XRD patterns; the ratio of sp2 carbon atoms to sp3 carbon atoms is demonstrated by XPS spectra; and the microcrystal structure is observed in the high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images. Temperature and pressure have an important impact on the quality of GMC samples. With the elevation of temperature, the fraction of carbon increases, while the fraction of oxygen decreases, and the ratio of sp2 to sp3 carbon atoms increases. In contrast to the pyrolysis techniques, the HTC technique needs lower temperatures because of the high vapor pressure of water. In general, with the help of biorefinery, the biomass material, lignin, is found to be qualified and sustainable material for the manufacture of GMC. Lignin acts as a renewable substitute for the traditional raw materials of glassy carbon, copolymer resins of phenol formaldehyde, and furfuryl alcohol-phenol. Full article
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Graphical abstract

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