Special Issue "Igneous Rocks: Minerals, Geochemistry and Ore Potential"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alexey V. Ivanov

Institute of the Earth’s Crust, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk, 664033, Russia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: large igneous provinces; igneous petrology; geochemistry; geochronology; geology of Siberia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Igneous rocks are primary rocks. They are highly variable in mineral and chemical composition. For example, in a seminal book by Le Matre et al. (1989) ‘A classification of igneous rocks and glossary of terms: Recommendations of the International Union of Geological Sciences Subcommission on the Systematics of Igneous Rocks’ more than 1500 rock names were listed, though most of them were abandoned as outdated and the entire igneous rock classification was compacted to a hundred rock names. Igneous rocks were formed by all geological times and are being formed today in continents and oceans. They are primary rocks on Mars, Venus, and Mercury, Moon, Io and large asteroids; though samples from these planetary bodies are incomparably less abundant to what geologists have in their collections for Earth. Therefore, it is not surprised that many geological journals are focusing on study of igneous rocks in principle or produced special issues devoted to them. This Special Issue of Minerals finds its niche in the scope of the journal’s primary aims by focusing on igneous rocks mineral composition and chemical characterization (including isotopes). In addition to these, papers exploring association of igneous rocks with ore deposits are particularly welcomed.

Dr. Alexey V. Ivanov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Igneous rocks
  • minerals
  • geochemistry
  • isotopes
  • geochronology
  • ore deposits

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Paleoproterozoic Multiple Tectonothermal Events in the Longshoushan Area, Western North China Craton and Their Geological Implication: Evidence from Geochemistry, Zircon U–Pb Geochronology and Hf Isotopes
Minerals 2018, 8(9), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8090361
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 5 August 2018 / Accepted: 9 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
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Abstract
The Alxa block is located in the southwestern margin of the North China Craton. The Paleoproterozoic tectonic evolution, crustal growth and tectonic affinity of the block remain unknown or controversial. The Longshoushan (LS) area is one of the few areas that outcrop Paleoproterozoic
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The Alxa block is located in the southwestern margin of the North China Craton. The Paleoproterozoic tectonic evolution, crustal growth and tectonic affinity of the block remain unknown or controversial. The Longshoushan (LS) area is one of the few areas that outcrop Paleoproterozoic to crystalline basement rocks in the Alxa Block. In this study, we preset whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U–Pb geochronology and Lu–Hf isotope data from metagabbro, metadiorite, quartz syenite, granitic leucosome and pegmatoid leucosome in the LS area. These rocks all are enriched in LREE and LILE, and depleted in HREE and HFSE. Eight new LA-ICP-MS zircon U–Pb ages yielded three magmatic ages of 2044 Ma, 2029 Ma and 1940 Ma, and three metamorphic ages of 1891 Ma, 1848 Ma and 1812 Ma. Lu–Hf analyses reveal that the magmatic zircons and anatectic/metamorphic zircons from all the rock types are characterized by positive εHf(t) (−0.16 to 10.89) and variable εHf(t) (−11.21 to 6.24), respectively. Based on the previous studies and our new data, we conclude that the LS area experienced three magmatic events (2.5–2.45 Ga, ~2.1–2.0 Ga and ~1.95–1.91 Ga) and three regional metamorphism/anataxis events (~1.93–1.89 Ga, ~1.86–1.84 Ga and ~1.81 Ga) in Paleoproterozoic. The age–Hf isotope data establishes two main crustal growth events at ~2.9–2.5 Ga and ~2.2–2.0 Ga in the LS area. These data indicate that the LS area experienced intraplate extensional setting in the middle Paleoproterozoic, and continental subduction, collision and exhumation in the late Paleoproterozoic. Combining the geochronological framework and tectonic evolution, we suggest that the Alxa Block is part of the Khondalite Belt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Igneous Rocks: Minerals, Geochemistry and Ore Potential)
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Open AccessArticle Mineralogical, Rock-Magnetic and Palaeomagnetic Properties of Metadolerites from Central Western Svalbard
Minerals 2018, 8(7), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8070279
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 21 June 2018 / Accepted: 26 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
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Abstract
A combination of mineralogical, rock-magnetic and palaeomagnetic methods were employed in an attempt to shed a new light on the tectonism and paleogeography of Central Western Svalbard. The focus is on six metadolerite sites from the metamorphic Proterozoic–Lower Palaeozoic complex of south-western Oscar
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A combination of mineralogical, rock-magnetic and palaeomagnetic methods were employed in an attempt to shed a new light on the tectonism and paleogeography of Central Western Svalbard. The focus is on six metadolerite sites from the metamorphic Proterozoic–Lower Palaeozoic complex of south-western Oscar II Land (Western Spitsbergen). The primary mineral compositions of the metadolerites were strongly remineralized during Caledonian (sensu lato) greenschist-facies metamorphism although some younger tectonothermal modification is also apparent from the rock-magnetic studies. Rock-magnetic experiments supported by thin-section mineral identification and separation of Fe-containing fractions indicate that the main ferromagnetic carriers of the Natural Remanent Magnetization are represented by low-coercivity pyrrhotite and magnetite/maghemite. The investigated metadolerites are characterized by complex pattern of magnetization. The low-temperature palaeomagnetic components which demagnetized up to 250 °C, are characterized by high inclinations (~70–80°) potentially representing Mesozoic–Cenozoic remagnetization. The most stable middle-high temperature directions which demagnetized from 250 °C, were obtained from only two of six sites. Two Virtual Geomagnetic Poles calculated from two of the middle-high temperature site means do not correlate with the Laurussia reference path for syn- to post-Caledonian time. Two possible explanations of observed inconsistency are discussed. These are a modification of the Oscar II Land Caledonian basement geometry by listric faulting and/or tectonic rotations related to Daudmannsdalen–Protectorbreen high-strain (shear) zone. The results presented here suggest that post-Caledonian tectonic modification of the palaeomagnetic directions may be more a widespread feature of Western Svalbard. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Igneous Rocks: Minerals, Geochemistry and Ore Potential)
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