Special Issue "Serration and Noise Behavior in Advanced Materials"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter K. Liaw

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996-2100, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mechanical behavior, fatigue and fracture behavior, nondestructive-evaluation, and neutron/synchrotron studies of advanced materials, including bulk-metallic glasses, nano-structural materials, high-entropy alloys, superalloys, steels, and intermetallics
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yong Zhang

High-Entropy Alloys Research Center, State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0086-010-62333073
Interests: high entropy and amorphous alloys, serration and noise in materials, metamaterials
Guest Editor
Dr. Yong Yang

P6412 Academic Building 1, Center for Advanced Structural Materials (CASM), Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Website | E-Mail
Interests: metallic glasses, high entropy alloys, fatigue and fracture, flexible electronics and structural biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Noise” is everywhere in our daily life, such as the crackling noise arising from paper crumpling and fault movement during earthquakes. In materials science, the phenomenon of noise is also ubiquitous, particularly, in the study of the deformation behavior of materials, which usually manifests as serrated plastic flows. Over the past few years, this interesting and universal phenomenon has attracted tremendous research interest, which can be observed among a wide range of advanced materials, from granular matters, single-crystalline metals, AlMg alloys, low carbon and TWIP steels, shape memory alloys, high entropy alloys to metallic glasses. To provide a physical understanding of universal noise behavior, different elastic coupling models have been proposed, with a variety of scaling relations being predicted. However, the source of noise when these advanced materials are deformed is still being debated. To materials scientists, understanding the structural origin of the noise may help avoid catastrophic failure and therefore inform the design of plasticity in these advanced materials. In this Special Issue, we intend to provide comprehensive studies related to the serration and noise behavior of various advanced materials. Topics include theoretical modeling, experimental characterization, and numerical simulations.

Prof. Dr. Peter K. Liaw
Prof. Dr. Yong Zhang
Dr. Yong Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • plastic deformation and serration behavior
  • high entropy and amorphous alloys
  • shape memory alloys and TWIP steel
  • Barkhausen Noise
  • structural units for plastic deformation
  • PLC serrations in AlMg alloys and low carbon steels

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Relaxation Mechanisms, Structure and Properties of Semi-Coherent Interfaces
Metals 2015, 5(4), 1887-1901; doi:10.3390/met5041887
Received: 12 August 2015 / Revised: 9 October 2015 / Accepted: 12 October 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1902 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111) semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE) profile of the interface,
[...] Read more.
In this work, using the Cu–Ni (111) semi-coherent interface as a model system, we combine atomistic simulations and defect theory to reveal the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of semi-coherent interfaces. By calculating the generalized stacking fault energy (GSFE) profile of the interface, two stable structures and a high-energy structure are located. During the relaxation, the regions that possess the stable structures expand and develop into coherent regions; the regions with high-energy structure shrink into the intersection of misfit dislocations (nodes). This process reduces the interface excess potential energy but increases the core energy of the misfit dislocations and nodes. The core width is dependent on the GSFE of the interface. The high-energy structure relaxes by relative rotation and dilatation between the crystals. The relative rotation is responsible for the spiral pattern at nodes. The relative dilatation is responsible for the creation of free volume at nodes, which facilitates the nodes’ structural transformation. Several node structures have been observed and analyzed. The various structures have significant impact on the plastic deformation in terms of lattice dislocation nucleation, as well as the point defect formation energies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Serration and Noise Behavior in Advanced Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle A Computationally-Efficient Numerical Model to Characterize the Noise Behavior of Metal-Framed Walls
Metals 2015, 5(3), 1414-1431; doi:10.3390/met5031414
Received: 12 June 2015 / Accepted: 3 August 2015 / Published: 7 August 2015
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Abstract
Architects, designers, and engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically-efficient metal-framed walls, minimizing acoustic bridging. Therefore, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation complying with ISO 10140 are needed at a design stage. In order to achieve this, a numerical model
[...] Read more.
Architects, designers, and engineers are making great efforts to design acoustically-efficient metal-framed walls, minimizing acoustic bridging. Therefore, efficient simulation models to predict the acoustic insulation complying with ISO 10140 are needed at a design stage. In order to achieve this, a numerical model consisting of two fluid-filled reverberation chambers, partitioned using a metal-framed wall, is to be simulated at one-third-octaves. This produces a large simulation model consisting of several millions of nodes and elements. Therefore, efficient meshing procedures are necessary to obtain better solution times and to effectively utilise computational resources. Such models should also demonstrate effective Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) along with acoustic-fluid coupling to simulate a realistic scenario. In this contribution, the development of a finite element frequency-dependent mesh model that can characterize the sound insulation of metal-framed walls is presented. Preliminary results on the application of the proposed model to study the geometric contribution of stud frames on the overall acoustic performance of metal-framed walls are also presented. It is considered that the presented numerical model can be used to effectively visualize the noise behaviour of advanced materials and multi-material structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Serration and Noise Behavior in Advanced Materials)
Open AccessArticle The Self-Organized Critical Behavior in Pd-based Bulk Metallic Glass
Metals 2015, 5(3), 1188-1196; doi:10.3390/met5031188
Received: 25 May 2015 / Revised: 19 June 2015 / Accepted: 25 June 2015 / Published: 6 July 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (462 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) deform irreversibly through shear banding manifested as serrated-flow behavior during compressive tests. The strain-rate-dependent plasticity under uniaxial compression at the strain rates of 2 × 10−2, 2 × 10−3, and 2 × 10−4·s
[...] Read more.
Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) deform irreversibly through shear banding manifested as serrated-flow behavior during compressive tests. The strain-rate-dependent plasticity under uniaxial compression at the strain rates of 2 × 10−2, 2 × 10−3, and 2 × 10−4·s−1 in a Pd-based BMG is investigated. The serrated flow behavior is not observed in the stress-strain curve at the strain rate of 2 × 10−2·s−1. However, the medial state occurs at the strain rates of 2 × 10−3·s−1, and eventually the self-organized critical (SOC) behavior appears at the strain rate of 2 × 10−4·s−1. The distribution of the elastic energy density shows a power-law distribution with the power-law exponent of −2.76, suggesting that the SOC behavior appears. In addition, the cumulative probability is well approximated by a power-law distribution function with the power-law exponent of 0.22 at the strain rate of 2 × 10−4·s−1. The values of the goodness of fit are 0.95 and 0.99 at the strain rates of 2 × 10−3 and 2 × 10−4·s−1, respectively. The transition of the dynamic serrated flows of BMGs is from non-serrated flow to an intermediate state and finally to the SOC state with decreasing the strain rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Serration and Noise Behavior in Advanced Materials)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

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