Special Issue "Alloys for High-Temperature Applications"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Giulio Timelli

Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Strad. San Nicola 3, 36100 Vicenza, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: light alloys; foundry; numerical simulation of metallurgical processes; heat treatments; surface engineering; high-temperature alloys; solidification

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High-temperature resistance is essential in many applications. The materials and alloys used for high-temperature components require a tailored combination of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Turbine blades, heat-exchangers, fuel nozzles, newer turbocharged engines are subjected to high tensile loads and pressures, as well as corrosive environments, all of which occurring under thermal fatigue conditions.

Operating at higher efficiency is often a key issue in order to achieve fuel economy, reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and improved vehicle performance too. The requirement of higher operating temperatures is almost mandatory for higher efficiency. This challenge will drive to continuously improve the traditional materials and develop new alloys before brittle non-metallic materials, such as oxide systems, can be thought and applied. Large opportunities are available for designing innovative materials and alloys showing improved ability to be processed, as well as higher performances.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect full papers, communications, and reviews highlighting original and recent innovations about metals, alloys and composite materials for high-temperature applications.

Prof. Dr. Giulio Timelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microstructure and texture
  • high-temperature alloys
  • mechanical properties at elevated temperature
  • physical properties
  • alloy design
  • thermal stability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Initial Microstructures on Hot Deformation Behavior and Workability of Ti2AlNb-Based Alloy
Metals 2018, 8(6), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8060382
Received: 12 May 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
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Abstract
In order to study the effect of initial microstructures on the hot deformation behavior and workability of Ti2AlNb alloy, the isothermal compression experiments of as-rolled and solution-treated Ti–19Al–23Nb–0.5Mo alloys were conducted in the temperature range of 900–1100 °C and strain rate
[...] Read more.
In order to study the effect of initial microstructures on the hot deformation behavior and workability of Ti2AlNb alloy, the isothermal compression experiments of as-rolled and solution-treated Ti–19Al–23Nb–0.5Mo alloys were conducted in the temperature range of 900–1100 °C and strain rate range of 0.001–10 s−1. Subsequently, the processing maps of different state materials were established based on dynamic material model (DMM) and Prasad’s instability criterion. The suitable regions for hot working were determined in the processing maps, which was verified through high-temperature tensile test. The results show that although the solution-treatment could be used to improve the ductility of as-rolled Ti2AlNb alloy at room temperature, the as-rolled microstructure exhibited better hot workability at high temperature compared to the solution-treated microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alloys for High-Temperature Applications)
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Open AccessArticle The Evolution of Cast Microstructures on the HAZ Liquation Cracking of Mar-M004 Weld
Metals 2018, 8(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8010035
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 5 January 2018
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Abstract
The causes of liquation cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a cast Mar-M004 superalloy weld were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were applied to identify the final microconstituents at the solidification boundaries of the
[...] Read more.
The causes of liquation cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a cast Mar-M004 superalloy weld were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were applied to identify the final microconstituents at the solidification boundaries of the cast alloy. Fine borides and lamellar eutectics were present in front of some γ-γ′ colonies, which were expected to be liquefied prematurely during welding. The metal carbide (MC) enriched in Nb, Hf; M3B2 and M5B3 borides enriched in Cr and Mo; and lamellar Ni-Hf intermetallics were mainly responsible for the induced liquation cracking of the Mar-M004 weld, especially the MC carbides. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fractographs showed that the fracture features of those liquation cracks were associated with the interdendritic constituents in the cast superalloy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alloys for High-Temperature Applications)
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