Special Issue "Nanostructured Surfaces in Metallic Biomaterials"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mieczyslaw Jurczyk

Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, M.Sklodowska-Curie 5 Sq., 60-965 Poznan, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanostructured materials; non-equilibrium processing and properties of advanced materials/nanomaterials; microstructural characterization; powder processing; composites/nanocomposites; porous metallic bionanomaterials/bionanocomposites; hydrogen storage materials/nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past few years, nanomaterials have become very popular in medical applications. The enhancement of bone formation, at the bone–implant interface, has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblast adhesion and spreading, induced by modifications at the nanoscale level of implant surfaces.

Titanium and titanium alloys are preferred materials in the production of implants. Currently, titanium and its alloys are used for dentistry devices, such as implants, crowns, bridges, overdentures, and dental implant prosthesis components (screw and abutment).

Current research focuses on improving the mechanical performance and biocompatibility of Ti-based systems through variations in alloy composition, microstructure and surface treatment. In the case of titanium, significant efforts go into enhancing the strength characteristics of commercial purity grades to avoid potential biotoxicity of alloying elements.

Recent studies have clearly proved that nanostructuring of titanium can considerably improve, not only mechanical properties, but also biocompatibility. This approach also has the benefit of enhancing the biological response of the cp titanium surface. For providing fast osseointegration and long-term usage in the human body, the implant surface should be modified, i.e., it should be rough or porous, oxidized, and covered by a biocompatible coating, including calcium–phosphate compounds. Surfaces showing, micro- and nano-irregularities are useful in biocompatibility improvements.

This Special Issue aims to present the latest research related to nanostructured surfaces in metallic biomaterials. Research reports associated with the manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation, as well as modifications of implant surfaces at the nanometric level are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Mieczyslaw Jurczyk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metallic biomaterials
  • titanium
  • nanotechnologies
  • surfaces
  • roughness
  • cell proliferation
  • differentiation
  • osteogenesis
  • implant

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Preparation of Chitosan/Poly‐γ‐Glutamic Acid Polyelectrolyte Multilayers on Biomedical Metals for Local Antibiotic Delivery
Metals 2017, 7(10), 418; doi:10.3390/met7100418
Received: 14 September 2017 / Revised: 2 October 2017 / Accepted: 5 October 2017 / Published: 7 October 2017
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Abstract
Polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly is one of the most widely applied biomaterial coatings for applications from surface modification, drug delivery, tissue engineering to biomimetic extracellular environment. In this research, we propose a simple layer-wise spin coating technique to prepare chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid (C/PGA) polyelectrolyte multilayers
[...] Read more.
Polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly is one of the most widely applied biomaterial coatings for applications from surface modification, drug delivery, tissue engineering to biomimetic extracellular environment. In this research, we propose a simple layer-wise spin coating technique to prepare chitosan/poly-γ-glutamic acid (C/PGA) polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) on two different biomedical metals, 316L stainless steel (316LSS) and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). The multilayer coating was fabricated using oppositely charged chitosan and poly--glutamic acid to deposit a total of 10, 20, or 30 multilayered films. Afterward, tetracycline was loaded by soaking the coated metals for 12 hours. The microstructure, mechanical properties, biocompatibility and drug release rate were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement, MG63 cell viability and inhibition of Escherichia coli (E. coli) growth. Lastly, MG63 cell attachment was detected by fluorescence microscopy after staining with Hoechst 33258. This coating technique can prepare a layer of 2.2–6.9 m C/PGA PEMs favoring cell attachment and growth. Moreover, tetracycline was released from C/PGA PEMs and inhibited the growth of E. coli. The results suggest that C/PGA PEMs provide a useful platform for modulating the micro-environment for better cell adhesion and antibiotic delivery, which hold great potential for surface modification and drug loading for biomimetic materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Surfaces in Metallic Biomaterials)
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