Special Issue "Membrane Bioprocesses and Bioreactors"

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A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375). This special issue belongs to the section "Membrane Processes (Applications)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. José Sanchez-Marcano

Membranes European Institute, University of Montpellier 2, CC047 Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier-Cedex 5, France
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 33 467 14 91 19
Fax: 33 467 14 91 49
Interests: bio-catalytic and catalytic membrane reactors; modeling and simulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioprocess or bioconversion is certainly the most significant industrial area where the concept of membrane reactors is actually being applied. There is a vast variety of possible applications, including the treatment of contaminated air and water streams or other less known applications, e.g., the microbial transformations or enzymatic reactions for the production of a broad spectrum of products such as liquid fuels (e.g., ethanol), plant metabolites, fine chemicals, aroma compounds, etc. These membrane bioprocesses are also important in pharmaceutical and medical industries, as they allow the production of complex molecules, e.g., hormones and monoclonal antibodies, or can be designed as artificial organs.

Membrane bioprocesses can be carried out in two different configurations. In the first, the coupling of the separation and the bioreaction in a single process is carried out by simply connecting two physically distinct units: the reactor and membrane separator. The second configuration allows the process intensification through the combination of both processes into a single unit: the membrane bioreactor. The modeling and simulation of such complex processes aims to determine the limiting parameters; coupling the mass transfers with biological kinetics is essential for the process optimization.

This Special Issue offers a perfect site to document the latest developments and innovations regarding membrane bioprocesses. Authors are therefore invited to submit their latest findings.

Dr. José Sanchez-Marcano
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • membrane bioprocess
  • membrane bioreactor
  • whole-cell membrane reactor
  • enzymatic membrane reactor
  • enzymatic membrane
  • artificial organs
  • modeling and simulation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water
Membranes 2014, 4(4), 678-691; doi:10.3390/membranes4040678
Received: 27 June 2014 / Revised: 8 September 2014 / Accepted: 18 September 2014 / Published: 6 October 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR). The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) was selected  from
[...] Read more.
This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR). The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP) to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L−1), consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h−1·m−2 at 128 L·h−1·m−2), whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L−1), it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioprocesses and Bioreactors)
Open AccessArticle Biogas Production from Citrus Waste by Membrane Bioreactor
Membranes 2014, 4(3), 596-607; doi:10.3390/membranes4030596
Received: 29 June 2014 / Revised: 28 July 2014 / Accepted: 19 August 2014 / Published: 27 August 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (340 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF) membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in
[...] Read more.
Rapid acidification and inhibition by d-limonene are major challenges of biogas production from citrus waste. As limonene is a hydrophobic chemical, this challenge was encountered using hydrophilic polyvinylidine difluoride (PVDF) membranes in a biogas reactor. The more sensitive methane-producing archaea were encapsulated in the membranes, while freely suspended digesting bacteria were present in the culture as well. In this membrane bioreactor (MBR), the free digesting bacteria digested the citrus wastes and produced soluble compounds, which could pass through the membrane and converted to biogas by the encapsulated cell. As a control experiment, similar digestions were carried out in bioreactors containing the identical amount of just free cells. The experiments were carried out in thermophilic conditions at 55 °C, and hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The organic loading rate (OLR) was started with 0.3 kg VS/m3/day and gradually increased to 3 kg VS/m3/day. The results show that at the highest OLR, MBR was successful to produce methane at 0.33 Nm3/kg VS, while the traditional free cell reactor reduced its methane production to 0.05 Nm3/kg VS. Approximately 73% of the theoretical methane yield was achieved using the membrane bioreactor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioprocesses and Bioreactors)
Open AccessArticle Continuous Ethanol Production with a Membrane Bioreactor at High Acetic Acid Concentrations
Membranes 2014, 4(3), 372-387; doi:10.3390/membranes4030372
Received: 13 April 2014 / Revised: 26 May 2014 / Accepted: 1 July 2014 / Published: 15 July 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (681 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The release of inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid from lignocellulosic raw materials during hydrolysis is one of the main concerns for 2nd generation ethanol production. The undissociated form of acetic acid can enter the cell by diffusion through the plasma membrane and trigger
[...] Read more.
The release of inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid from lignocellulosic raw materials during hydrolysis is one of the main concerns for 2nd generation ethanol production. The undissociated form of acetic acid can enter the cell by diffusion through the plasma membrane and trigger several toxic effects, such as uncoupling and lowered intracellular pH. The effect of acetic acid on the ethanol production was investigated in continuous cultivations by adding medium containing 2.5 to 20.0 g·L−1 acetic acid at pH 5.0, at a dilution rate of 0.5 h−1. The cultivations were performed at both high (~25 g·L−1) and very high (100–200 g·L−1) yeast concentration by retaining the yeast cells inside the reactor by a cross-flow membrane in a membrane bioreactor. The yeast was able to steadily produce ethanol from 25 g·L−1 sucrose, at volumetric rates of 5–6 g·L−1·h−1 at acetic acid concentrations up to 15.0 g·L−1. However, the yeast continued to produce ethanol also at a concentration of 20 g·L−1 acetic acid but at a declining rate. The study thereby demonstrates the great potential of the membrane bioreactor for improving the robustness of the ethanol production based on lignocellulosic raw materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioprocesses and Bioreactors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Filtration Behaviour and Fouling Mechanisms of Polysaccharides
Membranes 2014, 4(3), 319-332; doi:10.3390/membranes4030319
Received: 2 May 2014 / Revised: 24 June 2014 / Accepted: 30 June 2014 / Published: 8 July 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigated filtration behaviors of polysaccharides solutions, both alone and in mixture with proteins, in the short-time constant flux filtration with the focus on factors affecting the transmembrane pressure (TMP) increase rate, the irreversible filtration resistance, and the membrane rejection behavior. The
[...] Read more.
This study investigated filtration behaviors of polysaccharides solutions, both alone and in mixture with proteins, in the short-time constant flux filtration with the focus on factors affecting the transmembrane pressure (TMP) increase rate, the irreversible filtration resistance, and the membrane rejection behavior. The results showed that the TMP increase rates in the short-time constant flux filtration of alginate solutions were significantly affected by the calcium addition, alginate concentration, and flux. Although the addition of calcium resulted in a decrease in the TMP increase rate, it was found that the irreversible fouling developed during the filtration increased with the calcium addition, implying that the double-sided effect of calcium on membrane filtration and that the TMP increase rate observed in the filtration does not always reflect the irreversible membrane fouling development. It was also found that for the filtration of solutions containing mixed alginate and BSA, alginate exerted a dominant effect on the TMP increase rate and the membrane exhibited a reduced rejection to both alginate and BSA molecules compared to that in the filtration of the pure alginate or BSA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioprocesses and Bioreactors)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Membrane Bioprocesses for Pharmaceutical Micropollutant Removal from Waters
Membranes 2014, 4(4), 692-729; doi:10.3390/membranes4040692
Received: 11 July 2014 / Revised: 16 September 2014 / Accepted: 17 September 2014 / Published: 6 October 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1670 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this review work is to give an overview of the research reported on bioprocesses for the treatment of domestic or industrial wastewaters (WW) containing pharmaceuticals. Conventional WW treatment technologies are not efficient enough to completely remove all pharmaceuticals from water.
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this review work is to give an overview of the research reported on bioprocesses for the treatment of domestic or industrial wastewaters (WW) containing pharmaceuticals. Conventional WW treatment technologies are not efficient enough to completely remove all pharmaceuticals from water. Indeed, these compounds are becoming an actual public health problem, because they are more and more present in underground and even in potable waters. Different types of bioprocesses are described in this work: from classical activated sludge systems, which allow the depletion of pharmaceuticals by bio-degradation and adsorption, to enzymatic reactions, which are more focused on the treatment of WW containing a relatively high content of pharmaceuticals and less organic carbon pollution than classical WW. Different aspects concerning the advantages of membrane bioreactors for pharmaceuticals removal are discussed, as well as the more recent studies on enzymatic membrane reactors to the depletion of these recalcitrant compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioprocesses and Bioreactors)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Continuous Ethanol Production with a Membrane Bioreactor at High Acetic Acid Concentrations
Author
s: Päivi Ylitervo 1,2,*, Carl Johan Franzén 2 and Mohammad J. Taherzadeh 1
Affiliation
s: 1 School of Engineering, University of Borås, 501 90 Borås, Sweden; E-Mails: paivi.ylitervo@hb.se (P.Y.), mohammad.taherzadeh@hb.se (M.J.T.)
2
Chemical and Biological Engineering - Industrial Biotechnology, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Göteborg, Sweden; E-Mail: franzen@chalmers.se (C.J.F.)
Abstract:
The release of inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid from lignocellulosic raw materials during hydrolysis is one of the main concerns for ethanol production. It is the undissociated form of acetic acid which can enter the cell by diffusion through the plasma membrane and trigger several toxic effects such as uncoupling and lowered intracellular pH. Acetic acids effect on the ethanol production was studied in this investigated by adding medium containing from 2.5 up to 20.0 g L-1 acetic acid at pH 5.0 at a dilution rate of 0.5 h-1 to a continuous cultivation. The cultivations were performed at high yeast by retaining the yeast cells inside the reactor by a cross-flow membrane in a membrane bioreactor. The long term effect of acetic acid at different concentrations on the ethanol production revealed that the yeast was able to stably produce ethanol up to a concentration of 15.0 g L-1 acetic acid. However, the yeast continued to produce ethanol also at a concentration of 20 g L-1 acetic acid but at a reducing rate. The study thereby demonstrates the great potential of membrane bioreactor for improving the robustness of the ethanol production based on lignocellulosic raw materials.
Keywords:
acetic acid; membrane bioreactor; bioethanol; cell retention; yeast

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water
Authors:
V. Chea, D Paolucci, J Sanchez and MP Belleville*
Affiliation:
IEM (Institut Européen des Membranes), UMR 5635 (CNRS-ENSCM-UM2), Université Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier, France; E-Mail: Marie-Pierre.Belleville@univ-montp2.fr

Type of Paper: Review
Title:
Membrane Bioprocesses for Pharmaceutical Micropollutants Removal from Waters
Authors:
M. De Cazes, R. Abejon, J. Sanchez and MP Belleville*
Affiliation:
IEM (Institut Européen des Membranes), UMR 5635 (CNRS-ENSCM-UM2), Université Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier, France; E-Mail: Marie-Pierre.Belleville@univ-montp2.fr

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