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Special Issue "Fluorescent Sensors for Selective Detection"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Hisashi Satoh

Division of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sensor development; wastewater treatments; environmental water quality management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reliable detection of organic and inorganic matter and microorganisms is an important task for environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, food safety, industrial quality control, agriculture and security. At present, we are using traditional analytical techniques, such as a gas or liquid chromatography, atomic absorption or emission spectroscopy (AAS/AES), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), mass spectroscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), for their detection. These techniques are highly accurate and sensitive to specific analytes of interest, but they are costly, available only in large centralized laboratories and require extensive sample pre-treatment, making it difficult for on-site, real-time, or in situ detection. In light of these drawbacks, development of novel analytical methods, which have higher sensitivity and selectivity, a shorter response time, and lower costs, have attracted recent attention. Among the currently developed sensors, one based on fluorescence detection is one of the most common analytical tools due to simplicity, low cost, high sensitivity and fast response. In this Special Issue, we will welcome submissions on articles addressing the sensor technology based on fluorescence measurements.

Assoc. Prof. Hisashi Satoh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fluorescent sensor
  • Simple detection
  • On-site analysis
  • Sensitivity
  • Selectivity
  • Response time
  • Cost
  • Organic matter
  • Inorganic matter
  • Microorganisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Extreme Ultraviolet to Visible Dispersed Single Photon Detection for Highly Sensitive Sensing of Fundamental Processes in Diverse Samples
Materials 2018, 11(6), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11060869
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
PDF Full-text (929 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The detection of a single photon is the most sensitive method for sensing of photon emission. A common technique for single photon detection uses microchannel plate arrays combined with photocathodes and position sensitive anodes. Here, we report on the combination of such detectors
[...] Read more.
The detection of a single photon is the most sensitive method for sensing of photon emission. A common technique for single photon detection uses microchannel plate arrays combined with photocathodes and position sensitive anodes. Here, we report on the combination of such detectors with grating diffraction spectrometers, constituting a low-noise wavelength resolving photon spectroscopy apparatus with versatile applicability. We recapitulate the operation principle of such detectors and present the details of the experimental set-up, which we use to investigate fundamental mechanisms in atomic and molecular systems after excitation with tuneable synchrotron radiation. Extensions for time and polarization resolved measurements are described and examples of recent applications in current research are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Sensors for Selective Detection)
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Open AccessArticle 3-[Bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-BODIPY as Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensor for Cu2+
Materials 2018, 11(5), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050814
Received: 8 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
PDF Full-text (2861 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We developed an asymmetric fluorescent sensor 1 for Cu2+, based on 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY), by introducing 4-carboxyphenyl and bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine groups at the 5- and 3-positions, respectively, of the BODIPY core. We then investigated the photophysical and cation-sensing properties of the
[...] Read more.
We developed an asymmetric fluorescent sensor 1 for Cu2+, based on 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY), by introducing 4-carboxyphenyl and bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine groups at the 5- and 3-positions, respectively, of the BODIPY core. We then investigated the photophysical and cation-sensing properties of the sensor. BODIPY 1 showed large absorption and fluorescence spectral shifts on binding to Cu2+. The fluorescence peak at 580 nm red-shifted to 620 nm. The binding stoichiometry of BODIPY 1 and Cu2+ was 1:3. The ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 620 nm to that at 580 nm (F620/F580) increased with increasing concentration of Cu2+ (3–10 equiv); this enabled ratiometric determination of Cu2+. Although BODIPY 1 showed good selectivity for Cu2+, there was an interfering effect of Fe3+. BODIPY 1 could be used for the naked-eye detection of Cu2+ in a water-containing sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Sensors for Selective Detection)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper:Article

Title:Single-photon detection for highly sensitive sensing of fundamental processes in all aggregate phases

Author(s) Andreas Hans, Philipp Schmidt, Christian Ozga, Arno Ehresmann, and André Knie 

Affiliation(s): Institute of Physics, University of Kassel, 34132 Kassel, Germany 

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