E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Developments in Organic Dyes and Pigments"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Harold Freeman

College of Textiles, North Carolina State University, NC 27695, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: color and dye chemistry and sciences; energy; environment and sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent open literature is replete with reports pertaining to the design, synthesis and characterization of novel dyes and pigments, making it clear that this field continues to provide fertile ground for interesting and fruitful discoveries. As one would imagine, these reports are scattered across numerous types of journals, books, and patents, requiring most investigators to sort through a wide scope of materials to capture the diversity of available information. With this in mind, a key goal of the present Special Issue of Materials is to begin to bring together research and review papers pertaining to important recent developments in the dyes and pigments domain. It is envisioned that the coverage will involve current developments in the molecular design, synthesis, characterization, and application of organic and inorganic colorants for the visible and near-infrared regions. In this regard, colorants for use in food, drug, cosmetic and hair products, in digital printing and photography, in medical applications such as cancer phototherapy and biomedical assays, in solar energy capture and storage, optical imaging, and color laser marking for document security constitute the focus of this Special Issue. In addition, ongoing risk assessments pertaining to certain synthetic dyes make the environmental properties of dyes an obvious topic to include. While this issue will not be exhaustive in scope, it will provide a beneficial step forward and, therefore, be of interest to academic and industrial researchers, making it an important resource for both settings.

Prof. Dr. Harold Freeman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • synthesis
  • eco/genotoxicology
  • colorants for digital printing
  • functional dyes and pigments
  • medical dyes
  • molecular design
  • natural dyes
  • dyes for photography
  • dyes for solar cells
  • hair dyes
  • textile dyes
  • inorganic colorants

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Photoluminescent Properties of New Cationic Iridium(III) Complexes Using Different Anions and Their Applications in White Light-Emitting Diodes
Materials 2015, 8(9), 6105-6116; doi:10.3390/ma8095296
Received: 19 July 2015 / Revised: 29 August 2015 / Accepted: 6 September 2015 / Published: 14 September 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Three cationic iridium(III) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(phen)][PF6] (C1), [Ir(ppy)2(phen)]2SiF6 (C2) and [Ir(ppy)2(phen)]2TiF6 (C3) (ppy: 2-phenylpyridine, phen: 1, 10-phenanthroline) using different anions were synthesized and characterized by 1H Nuclear magnetic resonance
[...] Read more.
Three cationic iridium(III) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(phen)][PF6] (C1), [Ir(ppy)2(phen)]2SiF6 (C2) and [Ir(ppy)2(phen)]2TiF6 (C3) (ppy: 2-phenylpyridine, phen: 1, 10-phenanthroline) using different anions were synthesized and characterized by 1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR), mass spectra (MS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and element analysis (EA). After the ultraviolet visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, photoluminescent (PL) properties and thermal properties of the complexes were investigated, complex C1 and C3 with good optical properties and high thermal stability were used in white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) as luminescence conversion materials by incorporation with 460 nm-emitting blue GaN chips. The integrative performances of the WLEDs fabricated with complex C1 and C3 are better than those fabricated with the widely used yellow phosphor Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG). The color rendering indexes of the WLEDs with C1 and C3 are 82.0 and 82.6, the color temperatures of them are 5912 K and 3717 K, and the maximum power efficiencies of them are 10.61 Lm·W−1 and 11.41 Lm·W−1, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Organic Dyes and Pigments)
Open AccessArticle Plant Growth Absorption Spectrum Mimicking Light Sources
Materials 2015, 8(8), 5265-5275; doi:10.3390/ma8085240
Received: 11 June 2015 / Revised: 28 July 2015 / Accepted: 10 August 2015 / Published: 13 August 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1363 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Plant factories have attracted increasing attention because they can produce fresh fruits and vegetables free from pesticides in all weather. However, the emission spectra from current light sources significantly mismatch the spectra absorbed by plants. We demonstrate a concept of using multiple broad-band
[...] Read more.
Plant factories have attracted increasing attention because they can produce fresh fruits and vegetables free from pesticides in all weather. However, the emission spectra from current light sources significantly mismatch the spectra absorbed by plants. We demonstrate a concept of using multiple broad-band as well as narrow-band solid-state lighting technologies to design plant-growth light sources. Take an organic light-emitting diode (OLED), for example; the resulting light source shows an 84% resemblance with the photosynthetic action spectrum as a twin-peak blue dye and a diffused mono-peak red dye are employed. This OLED can also show a greater than 90% resemblance as an additional deeper red emitter is added. For a typical LED, the resemblance can be improved to 91% if two additional blue and red LEDs are incorporated. The approach may facilitate either an ideal use of the energy applied for plant growth and/or the design of better light sources for growing different plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Organic Dyes and Pigments)
Figures

Open AccessArticle 1,6- and 1,7-Regioisomers of Highly Soluble Amino-Substituted Perylene Tetracarboxylic Dianhydrides: Synthesis, Optical and Electrochemical Properties
Materials 2015, 8(8), 4943-4960; doi:10.3390/ma8084943
Received: 3 July 2015 / Revised: 29 July 2015 / Accepted: 30 July 2015 / Published: 3 August 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2640 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
1,6- and 1,7-regioisomers of diamino-substituted perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydrides (PTCDs) with different n-alkyl chain lengths (n = 6, 12 or 18) were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. These dyes are highly soluble in most organic solvents and even
[...] Read more.
1,6- and 1,7-regioisomers of diamino-substituted perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydrides (PTCDs) with different n-alkyl chain lengths (n = 6, 12 or 18) were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. These dyes are highly soluble in most organic solvents and even in nonpolar solvents, such as hexane. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the 1,6-diamino-substituted PTCDs (2a2c) have been obtained in pure form. The regioisomers 1a1c (1,7-) and 2a2c (1,6-) exhibit significant differences in their optical characteristics. In addition to the longest wavelength absorption band at around 674 nm, 2a2c exhibit another shoulder band at ca. 600 nm, and consequently, cover a large part of the visible region relative to those of 1a1c. Upon excitation, 2a2c also show larger dipole moment changes than those of 1a1c; the dipole moments of all compounds have been estimated using Lippert–Mataga equation. Moreover, all the dyes show a unique charge transfer emission in the near-infrared region, of which the peak wavelengths exhibit strong solvatochromism. They all exhibit one irreversible one-electron oxidation and two quasi-reversible one-electron reductions in dichloromethane at modest potentials. Complementary density functional theory calculations performed on these chromophores are reported in order to rationalize their electronic structure and optical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Organic Dyes and Pigments)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Kaolinite Nanocomposite Platelets Synthesized by Intercalation and Imidization of Poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)
Materials 2015, 8(7), 4363-4388; doi:10.3390/ma8074363
Received: 7 June 2015 / Revised: 4 July 2015 / Accepted: 9 July 2015 / Published: 16 July 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4522 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A synthesis route is presented for the subsequent intercalation, exfoliation and surface modification of kaolinite (Kln) by an imidization reaction of high-molecular weight poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) or SMA in the presence of ammonium hydroxide. In a first step, the intercalation of ammonolyzed
[...] Read more.
A synthesis route is presented for the subsequent intercalation, exfoliation and surface modification of kaolinite (Kln) by an imidization reaction of high-molecular weight poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) or SMA in the presence of ammonium hydroxide. In a first step, the intercalation of ammonolyzed SMA by guest displacement of intercalated dimethylsulfoxide has been proven. In a second step, the imidization of ammonolyzed SMA at 160 °C results in exfoliation of the kaolinite layers and deposition of poly(styrene-co-maleimide) or SMI nanoparticles onto the kaolinite surfaces. Compared with a physical mixture of Kln/SMI, the chemically reacted Kln/SMI provides more efficient exfoliation and hydrogen bonding between the nanoparticles and the kaolinite. The kaolinite nanocomposite particles are synthesized in aqueous dispersion with solid content of 65 wt %. The intercalation and exfoliation are optimized for a concentration ratio of Kln/SMI = 70:30, resulting in maximum intercalation and interlayer distance in combination with highest imide content. After thermal curing at 135 °C, the imidization proceeds towards a maximum conversion of the intermediate amic acid moieties. The changes in O–H stretching and kaolinite lattice vibrations have been illustrated by infrared and FT-Raman spectroscopy, which allow for a good quantification of concentration and imidization effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Organic Dyes and Pigments)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Photocatalytic Membrane Reactor for the Removal of C.I. Disperse Red 73
Materials 2015, 8(6), 3633-3647; doi:10.3390/ma8063633
Received: 7 April 2015 / Revised: 15 May 2015 / Accepted: 11 June 2015 / Published: 18 June 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (813 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After the dyeing process, part of the dyes used to color textile materials are not fixed into the substrate and are discharged into wastewater as residual dyes. In this study, a heterogeneous photocatalytic process combined with microfiltration has been investigated for the removal
[...] Read more.
After the dyeing process, part of the dyes used to color textile materials are not fixed into the substrate and are discharged into wastewater as residual dyes. In this study, a heterogeneous photocatalytic process combined with microfiltration has been investigated for the removal of C.I. Disperse Red 73 from synthetic textile effluents. The titanium dioxide (TiO2) Aeroxide P25 was selected as photocatalyst. The photocatalytic treatment achieved between 60% and 90% of dye degradation and up to 98% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal. The influence of different parameters on photocatalytic degradation was studied: pH, initial photocatalyst loading, and dye concentration. The best conditions for dye degradation were pH 4, an initial dye concentration of 50 mg·L−1, and a TiO2 loading of 2 g·L1. The photocatalytic membrane treatment provided a high quality permeate, which can be reused. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Organic Dyes and Pigments)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials Edit a special issue Review for Materials
logo
loading...
Back to Top