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Special Issue "Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jagdish Narayan

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, EB I, Room 3030, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 919 515 7642
Interests: ion implantation and defects in semiconductors; rapid thermal and transient thermal processing of semiconductors; laser-solid interactions; doping, diffusion and gettering in semiconductors and supersaturated semiconductor alloys for advanced electronic devices; high temperature superconductors; diamond and diamond-like thin films; atomic scale characterization of defects and interfaces; physical and chemical vapor deposition of thin films; pulsed laser deposition; Laser-MBE; atomic-resolution electron microscopy; electrical and optical properties; modeling of thin film growth and defects and interfaces; novel approaches to thin film epitaxy; semiconductor thin film heterostructures and solid-state devices; and nanostructured materials
Guest Editor
Dr. C. Lewis Reynolds Jr.

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, EB I, Room 3002C, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: compound semiconductor materials and devices; electrical and optical properties; thin film epitaxial growth of group III-nitrides and group II-oxides; heteroepitaxy; strain relaxation in misfit systems; defects and interfaces; quantum well structures; electronic and photonic devices; nanostructured materials

Special Issue Information

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • II-oxides
  • nitride-based heterostructures
  • III-V materials
  • III-nitrides
  • thin film epitaxy
  • heteroepitaxy
  • misfit scale
  • nanostructures
  • integration on Si
  • solar cells
  • electronic devices
  • photonic devices

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle GaN Micromechanical Resonators with Meshed Metal Bottom Electrode
Materials 2015, 8(3), 1204-1212; doi:10.3390/ma8031204
Received: 30 July 2014 / Revised: 13 February 2015 / Accepted: 12 March 2015 / Published: 17 March 2015
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Abstract
This work describes a novel architecture to realize high-performance gallium nitride (GaN) bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators. The method is based on the growth of a thick GaN layer on a metal electrode grid. The fabrication process starts with the growth of a
[...] Read more.
This work describes a novel architecture to realize high-performance gallium nitride (GaN) bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators. The method is based on the growth of a thick GaN layer on a metal electrode grid. The fabrication process starts with the growth of a thin GaN buffer layer on a Si (111) substrate. The GaN buffer layer is patterned and trenches are made and refilled with sputtered tungsten (W)/silicon dioxide (SiO2) forming passivated metal electrode grids. GaN is then regrown, nucleating from the exposed GaN seed layer and coalescing to form a thick GaN device layer. A metal electrode can be deposited and patterned on top of the GaN layer. This method enables vertical piezoelectric actuation of the GaN layer using its largest piezoelectric coefficient (d33) for thickness-mode resonance. Having a bottom electrode also results in a higher coupling coefficient, useful for the implementation of acoustic filters. Growth of GaN on Si enables releasing the device from the frontside using isotropic xenon difluoride (XeF2) etch and therefore eliminating the need for backside lithography and etching. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
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Open AccessArticle Suppression of 3C-Inclusion Formation during Growth of 4H-SiC Si-Face Homoepitaxial Layers with a 1° Off-Angle
Materials 2014, 7(10), 7010-7021; doi:10.3390/ma7107010
Received: 31 July 2014 / Revised: 18 September 2014 / Accepted: 30 September 2014 / Published: 17 October 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1060 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We grew epitaxial layers on 4H-silicon carbide (SiC) Si-face substrates with a 1° off-angle. The suppression of 3C-inclusion formation during growth at a high C/Si ratio was investigated, because a growth technique with a high C/Si ratio is needed
[...] Read more.
We grew epitaxial layers on 4H-silicon carbide (SiC) Si-face substrates with a 1° off-angle. The suppression of 3C-inclusion formation during growth at a high C/Si ratio was investigated, because a growth technique with a high C/Si ratio is needed to decrease residual nitrogen incorporation. 3C inclusions were generated both at the interface between the substrate and epitaxial layer, and during epitaxial growth. 3C-SiC nucleation is proposed to trigger the formation of 3C inclusions. We suppressed 3C-inclusion formation by performing deep in situ etching and using a high C/Si ratio, which removed substrate surface damage and improved the 4H-SiC stability, respectively. The as-grown epitaxial layers had rough surfaces because of step bunching due to the deep in situ etching, but the rough surface became smooth after chemical mechanical polishing treatment. These techniques allow the growth of epitaxial layers with 1° off-angles for a wide range of doping concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
Open AccessArticle A Self-Aligned a-IGZO Thin-Film Transistor Using a New Two-Photo-Mask Process with a Continuous Etching Scheme
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5761-5768; doi:10.3390/ma7085761
Received: 26 June 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 July 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1044 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Minimizing the parasitic capacitance and the number of photo-masks can improve operational speed and reduce fabrication costs. Therefore, in this study, a new two-photo-mask process is proposed that exhibits a self-aligned structure without an etching-stop layer. Combining the backside-ultraviolet (BUV) exposure and backside-lift-off
[...] Read more.
Minimizing the parasitic capacitance and the number of photo-masks can improve operational speed and reduce fabrication costs. Therefore, in this study, a new two-photo-mask process is proposed that exhibits a self-aligned structure without an etching-stop layer. Combining the backside-ultraviolet (BUV) exposure and backside-lift-off (BLO) schemes can not only prevent the damage when etching the source/drain (S/D) electrodes but also reduce the number of photo-masks required during fabrication and minimize the parasitic capacitance with the decreasing of gate overlap length at same time. Compared with traditional fabrication processes, the proposed process yields that thin-film transistors (TFTs) exhibit comparable field-effect mobility (9.5 cm2/V·s), threshold voltage (3.39 V), and subthreshold swing (0.3 V/decade). The delay time of an inverter fabricated using the proposed process was considerably decreased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
Open AccessArticle High Purity and Yield of Boron Nitride Nanotubes Using Amorphous Boron and a Nozzle-Type Reactor
Materials 2014, 7(8), 5789-5801; doi:10.3390/ma7085789
Received: 1 July 2014 / Revised: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 11 August 2014
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Abstract
Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor
[...] Read more.
Enhancement of the production yield of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with high purity was achieved using an amorphous boron-based precursor and a nozzle-type reactor. Use of a mixture of amorphous boron and Fe decreases the milling time for the preparation of the precursor for BNNTs synthesis, as well as the Fe impurity contained in the B/Fe interdiffused precursor nanoparticles by using a simple purification process. We also explored a nozzle-type reactor that increased the production yield of BNNTs compared to a conventional flow-through reactor. By using a nozzle-type reactor with amorphous boron-based precursor, the weight of the BNNTs sample after annealing was increased as much as 2.5-times with much less impurities compared to the case for the flow-through reactor with the crystalline boron-based precursor. Under the same experimental conditions, the yield and quantity of BNNTs were estimated as much as ~70% and ~1.15 g/batch for the former, while they are ~54% and 0.78 g/batch for the latter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Polymer-Derived Boron Nitride: A Review on the Chemistry, Shaping and Ceramic Conversion of Borazine Derivatives
Materials 2014, 7(11), 7436-7459; doi:10.3390/ma7117436
Received: 19 August 2014 / Revised: 16 September 2014 / Accepted: 11 November 2014 / Published: 21 November 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (743 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Boron nitride (BN) is a III-V compound which is the focus of important research since its discovery in the early 19th century. BN is electronic to carbon and thus, in the same way that carbon exists as graphite, BN exists in the hexagonal
[...] Read more.
Boron nitride (BN) is a III-V compound which is the focus of important research since its discovery in the early 19th century. BN is electronic to carbon and thus, in the same way that carbon exists as graphite, BN exists in the hexagonal phase. The latter offers an unusual combination of properties that cannot be found in any other ceramics. However, these properties closely depend on the synthesis processes. This review states the recent developments in the preparation of BN through the chemistry, shaping and ceramic conversion of borazine derivatives. This concept denoted as Polymer-Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route allows tailoring the chemistry of precursors to elaborate complex BN shapes which cannot be obtained by conventional process. The effect of the chemistry of the molecular precursors, i.e., borazine and trichloroborazine, and their polymeric derivatives i.e., polyborazylene and poly[tri(methylamino)borazine], in which the specific functional groups and structural motifs determine the shaping potential by conventional liquid-phase process and plastic-forming techniques is discussed. Nanotubes, nano-fibers, coatings, monoliths and fiber-reinforced matrix composites are especially described. This leads to materials which are of significant engineering interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Compound Semiconductor Materials 2014)
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