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Special Issue "Advanced Materials for Transport Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr.-Ing. Dirk Lehmhus

ISIS Sensorial Materials Scientific Centre, University of Bremen, Bremen 28359, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: porous and cellular metals; metal foams; syntactic foams; metal matrix syntactic foams; metal matrix composites; powder metallurgy; powder technology; finite element analysis; integrated computational materials engineering (ICME); smart structures; sensor integration; sensorial materials; structural health monitoring (SHM)
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Joachim Hausmann

The Technical University of Kaiserslautern/Institut für Verbundwerkstoffe GmbH, Kaiserslautern, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: composite materials; material testing; component design; simulation; titanium matrix composites; metal polymer hybrid materials; selective laser melting of titanium aluminides
Guest Editor
Dr.-Ing. Axel von Hehl

Stiftung Institut für Werkstofftechnik (IWT), Bremen 28359, Germany
Website1 | Website2 | E-Mail
Interests: lightweight materials; alloy development for additive manufacturing; multi-material design; hybrid materials; processing; forming; selective laser melting; heat treatment; interface engineering; joining, modeling; testing and characterization; DPS calorimetry; failure mechanisms; survival probability models
Guest Editor
Dr.-Ing. Joerg Hohe

Fraunhofer IWM, Freiburg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: composite materials; cellular materials and solid foams; micromechanics; homogenization; design-of-materials; finite element analysis; integrated computational materials engineering (ICME); material models and implementation; optimization; probabilistic analysis
Guest Editor
Dr. ir. R.C. Alderliesten

TU Delft, Delft, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hybrid materials and structures; structural performance; structural integrity; fatigue; damage resistance; damage tolerance; durability
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Kambiz Kayvantash

Société CADLM, 32 rue Victor Balloche, Wissous 91320, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: numerical analysis; simulation and modeling, optimization, reliability and robustness; data mining; artificial intelligence; manufacturing and process health monitoring; material modeling; passenger safety; biomechanics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present Special Issue is linked to the symposium E6, also entitled;Advanced Materials for Transport Applications, which will take place within the framework of the Euromat 2017 conference, held in Thessaloniki, Greece, 17-22 September, 2017. The Euromat 2017 conference is organized by the Federation of European Materials Societies (FEMS) and is one of the largest events of its kind in Europe, covering the whole field of materials science and technology through a large number of dedicated symposia and attracting roughly 2000 attendees. Within this framework, our own symposium addresses questions related to the use of advanced materials in the transport industry, which includes the aerospace, automotive, railway and maritime sector. The symposium is the fifth of its kind at Euromat and thus continues a series which originated at Euromat 2009 and continued through the events in 2011, 2013, and 2015 until the present year.

To set a thematic focus beyond the area of application, we are specifically looking for contributions on

  • Additive Manufacturing for Transport Applications (Editors: Lehmhus,  von Hehl)

  • Hybrid Engineering Materials and Structures for Multi-Material Designs (von Hehl, Alderliesten, Hausmann)      

  • Light Weight Design and Composite Materials (all)      

  • Intelligent Materials, Structures and Systems (Lehmhus)      

  • Simulation, Modeling, Optimization and Big Data Applications for Process Discovery (Kayvantash, Hohe, Hausmann)

While the core of the Special Issue's contributions is meant to be sourced from the Euromat symposium, submissions are not limited to Euromat 2017 contributors. Instead, we explicitly welcome external submissions. The focal topics listed above are not meant to exclude articles from additional areas, as long as a link to applications in the transport sector is there. Similarly, we do not intend to limit the Special Issue's focus to structural materials only, but will endeavor to also include studies on functional materials with relevance for applications in transportation.

We are looking forward to receiving your submissions and would like to kindly invite you to address any of the Guest Editors in case of further questions.

Dr.-Ing. Dirk Lehmhus
Prof. Joachim Hausmann
Dr.-Ing. Axel von Hehl
Dr.-Ing. Joerg Hohe
Dr.ir. R.C. Alderliesten
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Kambiz Kayvantash
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lightweight design;

  • hybrid materials;

  • hybrid structures;

  • additive manufacturing;

  • smart structures;

  • material modeling;

  • modeling and simulation;

  • optimization;

  • numerical analysis;

  • artificial intelligence and data mining;

  • design-of-materials;

  • aerospace;

  • automotive;

  • railway;

  • maritime industry;

  • crash and safety;

  • structural health monitoring;

  • adaptive structures;

  • composites;

  • multi-material design

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Microstructure and Deformation Response of TRIP-Steel Syntactic Foams to Quasi-Static and Dynamic Compressive Loads
Materials 2018, 11(5), 656; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050656
Received: 20 March 2018 / Revised: 18 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
The implementation of hollow S60HS glass microspheres and Fillite 106 cenospheres in a martensitically transformable AISI 304L stainless steel matrix was realized by means of metal injection molding of feedstock with varying fractions of the filler material. The so-called TRIP-steel syntactic foams were
[...] Read more.
The implementation of hollow S60HS glass microspheres and Fillite 106 cenospheres in a martensitically transformable AISI 304L stainless steel matrix was realized by means of metal injection molding of feedstock with varying fractions of the filler material. The so-called TRIP-steel syntactic foams were studied with respect to their behavior under quasi-static compression and dynamic impact loading. The interplay between matrix material behavior and foam structure was discussed in relation to the findings of micro-structural investigations, electron back scatter diffraction EBSD phase analyses and magnetic measurements. During processing, the cenospheres remained relatively stable retaining their shape while the glass microspheres underwent disintegration associated with the formation of pre-cracked irregular inclusions. Consequently, the AISI 304L/Fillite 106 syntactic foams exhibited a higher compression stress level and energy absorption capability as compared to the S60HS-containing variants. The α -martensite kinetic of the steel matrix was significantly influenced by material composition, strain rate and arising deformation temperature. The highest ferromagnetic α -martensite phase fraction was detected for the AISI 304L/S60HS batches and the lowest for the TRIP-steel bulk material. Quasi-adiabatic sample heating, a gradual decrease in strain rate and an enhanced degree of damage controlled the mechanical deformation response of the studied syntactic foams under dynamic impact loading. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Transport Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Preliminary In-Situ Evaluation of an Innovative, Semi-Flexible Pavement Wearing Course Mixture Using Fast Falling Weight Deflectometer
Materials 2018, 11(4), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040611
Received: 2 February 2018 / Revised: 23 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 16 April 2018
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Abstract
In the last forty, years semi-flexible pavements have been successfully employed, especially in those areas subjected to heavy and slow-moving loads. They usually comprise a wearing course of Grouted Macadam, a composite pavement material that provides significant advantages in comparison to both concrete
[...] Read more.
In the last forty, years semi-flexible pavements have been successfully employed, especially in those areas subjected to heavy and slow-moving loads. They usually comprise a wearing course of Grouted Macadam, a composite pavement material that provides significant advantages in comparison to both concrete and asphalt pavements. On the other hand, the laying process of this material is a two-stage operation, and the realization complexity leads to long realization times and high initial costs. Therefore, the use of semi-flexible pavements has been limited to some fields of application and areas. Recently, an innovative material has been developed to be used as an alternative to Grouted Macadam for semi-flexible pavement wearing course realization. This material should provide similar or even superior characteristics compared to traditional Grouted Macadam. This will reduce semi-flexible pavement construction time and avoid the need for dividing the laying process. This paper presents an experimental program involving the use of FastFWD, as an APT device, to evaluate in-situ properties and performance of this material. The achieved results regarding the validation of this new material by means of FastFWD appear promising both in terms of the material’s properties and resistance to dynamic load repetitions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Transport Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Energy Absorption Capacity in Natural Fiber Reinforcement Composites Structures
Materials 2018, 11(3), 418; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11030418
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 26 February 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters
[...] Read more.
The study of natural fiber reinforcement composite structures has focused the attention of the automobile industry due to the new regulation in relation to the recyclability and the reusability of the materials preserving and/or improving the mechanical characteristics. The influence of different parameters on the material behavior of natural fiber reinforced plastic structures has been investigated, showing the potential for transport application in energy absorbing structures. Two different woven fabrics (twill and hopsack) made of flax fibers as well as a non-woven mat made of a mixture of hemp and kenaf fibers were employed as reinforcing materials. These reinforcing textiles were impregnated with both HD-PE (high-density polyethylen) and PLA (polylactic acid) matrix, using a continuous compression molding press. The impregnated semi-finished laminates (so-called organic sheets) were thermoformed in a second step to half-tubes that were assembled through vibration-welding process to cylindric crash absorbers. The specimens were loaded by compression to determine the specific energy absorption capacity. Quasi-static test results were compared to dynamic test data obtained on a catapult arrangement. The differences on the specific energies absorption (SEA) as a function of different parameters, such as the wall thickness, the weave material type, the reinforced textiles, and the matrix used, depending on the velocity rate application were quantified. In the case of quasi-static analysis it is observed a 20% increment in the SEA value when wove Hopsack fabric reinforcement is employed. No velocity rate influence from the material was observed on the SEA evaluation at higher speeds used to perform the experiments. The influence of the weave configuration (Hopsack) seems to be more stable against buckling effects at low loading rates with 10% higher SEA values. An increase of SEA level of up to 72% for PLA matrix was observed when compared with HD-PE matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Transport Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Modal Identification in an Automotive Multi-Component System Using HS 3D-DIC
Materials 2018, 11(2), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11020241
Received: 20 December 2017 / Revised: 13 January 2018 / Accepted: 2 February 2018 / Published: 5 February 2018
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Abstract
The modal characterization of automotive lighting systems becomes difficult using sensors due to the light weight of the elements which compose the component as well as the intricate access to allocate them. In experimental modal analysis, high speed 3D digital image correlation (HS
[...] Read more.
The modal characterization of automotive lighting systems becomes difficult using sensors due to the light weight of the elements which compose the component as well as the intricate access to allocate them. In experimental modal analysis, high speed 3D digital image correlation (HS 3D-DIC) is attracting the attention since it provides full-field contactless measurements of 3D displacements as main advantage over other techniques. Different methodologies have been published that perform modal identification, i.e., natural frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes using the full-field information. In this work, experimental modal analysis has been performed in a multi-component automotive lighting system using HS 3D-DIC. Base motion excitation was applied to simulate operating conditions. A recently validated methodology has been employed for modal identification using transmissibility functions, i.e., the transfer functions from base motion tests. Results make it possible to identify local and global behavior of the different elements of injected polymeric and metallic materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Transport Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Modal Parameters Evaluation in a Full-Scale Aircraft Demonstrator under Different Environmental Conditions Using HS 3D-DIC
Materials 2018, 11(2), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11020230
Received: 11 December 2017 / Revised: 23 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 2 February 2018
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Abstract
In real aircraft structures the comfort and the occupational performance of crewmembers and passengers are affected by the presence of noise. In this sense, special attention is focused on mechanical and material design for isolation and vibration control. Experimental characterization and, in particular,
[...] Read more.
In real aircraft structures the comfort and the occupational performance of crewmembers and passengers are affected by the presence of noise. In this sense, special attention is focused on mechanical and material design for isolation and vibration control. Experimental characterization and, in particular, experimental modal analysis, provides information for adequate cabin noise control. Traditional sensors employed in the aircraft industry for this purpose are invasive and provide a low spatial resolution. This paper presents a methodology for experimental modal characterization of a front fuselage full-scale demonstrator using high-speed 3D digital image correlation, which is non-invasive, ensuring that the structural response is unperturbed by the instrumentation mass. Specifically, full-field measurements on the passenger window area were conducted when the structure was excited using an electrodynamic shaker. The spectral analysis of the measured time-domain displacements made it possible to identify natural frequencies and full-field operational deflection shapes. Changes in the modal parameters due to cabin pressurization and the behavior of different local structural modifications were assessed using this methodology. The proposed full-field methodology allowed the characterization of relevant dynamic response patterns, complementing the capabilities provided by accelerometers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Transport Applications)
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