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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 5th International Conference on "Structural Analysis of Advanced Materials”"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. George Papanicolaou

Composite Materials Group (CMG), Department of Mechanical and Aeronautics Engineering, University of Patras, Patras GR-26500, Greece
Phone: +30 2610 997 238
Interests: Polymer Physics and Engineering; Mechanics of Micro- and Nano-Composite Materials; Sandwich structures; Micromechanical Modelling; Linear and Non-Linear Viscoelastic Behavior; Thermal Analysis; Dynamic-Mechanical Analysis; Impact Behavior; Environmental Effects-Fracture Mechanics; Adhesion; Interfaces and Interphases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Special issue information can be found at http://icsaam2013.upatras.gr/.

Prof. Dr. George Papanicolaou
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Optical Fiber Embedded in Epoxy Glass Unidirectional Fiber Composite System
Materials 2014, 7(1), 44-57; doi:10.3390/ma7010044
Received: 16 September 2013 / Revised: 24 November 2013 / Accepted: 17 December 2013 / Published: 20 December 2013
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Abstract
We aimed to embed silica optical fibers in composites (epoxy vinyl ester matrix reinforced with E-glass unidirectional fibers in mass fraction of 60%) in order to further monitor the robustness of civil engineering structures (such as bridges). A simple system was implemented [...] Read more.
We aimed to embed silica optical fibers in composites (epoxy vinyl ester matrix reinforced with E-glass unidirectional fibers in mass fraction of 60%) in order to further monitor the robustness of civil engineering structures (such as bridges). A simple system was implemented using two different silica optical fibers (F1—double coating of 172 µm diameter and F2—single coating of 101.8 µm diameter respectively). The optical fibers were dynamically tensile tested and Weibull plots were traced. Interfacial adhesion stress was determined using pull-out test and stress values were correlated to fracture mechanisms based on SEM observations. In the case of the optical fiber (OF) (F1)/resin system and OF (F1)/composite system, poor adhesion was reported that may be correlated to interface fracture at silica core level. Relevant applicable results were determined for OF (F2)/composite system. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Ferromagnetic Objects Magnetovision Detection System
Materials 2013, 6(12), 5593-5601; doi:10.3390/ma6125593
Received: 9 August 2013 / Revised: 10 October 2013 / Accepted: 18 November 2013 / Published: 2 December 2013
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Abstract
This paper presents the application of a weak magnetic fields magnetovision scanning system for detection of dangerous ferromagnetic objects. A measurement system was developed and built to study the magnetic field vector distributions. The measurements of the Earth’s field distortions caused by [...] Read more.
This paper presents the application of a weak magnetic fields magnetovision scanning system for detection of dangerous ferromagnetic objects. A measurement system was developed and built to study the magnetic field vector distributions. The measurements of the Earth’s field distortions caused by various ferromagnetic objects were carried out. The ability for passive detection of hidden or buried dangerous objects and the determination of their location was demonstrated. Full article
Open AccessArticle Developing a Sealing Material: Effect of Epoxy Modification on Specific Physical and Mechanical Properties
Materials 2013, 6(12), 5490-5501; doi:10.3390/ma6125490
Received: 30 September 2013 / Revised: 11 November 2013 / Accepted: 21 November 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (912 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To develop a matched sealing material for socket rehabilitation of grey cast iron pipes, an epoxy resin is modified by the addition of different components to improve the flexibility. Three different modifications are made by adding ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber powder, [...] Read more.
To develop a matched sealing material for socket rehabilitation of grey cast iron pipes, an epoxy resin is modified by the addition of different components to improve the flexibility. Three different modifications are made by adding ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber powder, reactive liquid polymer (ATBN) and epoxidized modifier. In this paper the effect of the modification method as well as the influence of absorption of water on the mechanical and physical properties are analyzed in terms of: tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, adhesion performance, pressure resistance, glass transition temperature and water content. A comparison with neat epoxy shows for all materials that the modulus of elasticity and strength decrease. Unlike other tested modification methods, the modification with rubber powder did not enhance the flexibility. All materials absorb water and a plasticization effect arises with further changes of mechanical and physical properties. The application of the sealant on the grey cast iron leads to a reduction of the strain at break (in comparison to the common tensile test of the pure materials) and has to be evaluated. The main requirement of pressure resistance up to 1 MPa was tested on two chosen materials. Both materials fulfill this requirement. Full article
Open AccessArticle Influence of Experimental Parameters on Fatigue Crack Growth and Heat Build-Up in Rubber
Materials 2013, 6(12), 5502-5516; doi:10.3390/ma6125502
Received: 16 September 2013 / Revised: 13 November 2013 / Accepted: 20 November 2013 / Published: 27 November 2013
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Abstract
Loading parameters (frequency, amplitude ratio and waveform) are varied to determine their influence on fatigue crack growth in rubber. Up to three different rubber blends are investigated: one actual engineering material and two model materials. Fatigue crack growth curves and strain distributions [...] Read more.
Loading parameters (frequency, amplitude ratio and waveform) are varied to determine their influence on fatigue crack growth in rubber. Up to three different rubber blends are investigated: one actual engineering material and two model materials. Fatigue crack growth curves and strain distributions of pure shear and faint waist pure shear samples are compared for a model material. Fatigue behavior is studied for three different frequencies (1 Hz, 3 Hz and 5 Hz). Amplitude ratio appears to be another important influence factor concerning fatigue crack growth in rubber. The beneficial effect of positive amplitude ratios (tensional loading conditions) is shown for different materials. However, fatigue crack growth is considerably increased for negative amplitude ratios (tensional-compressional loading conditions). Furthermore, the influence of the waveform is determined for three different waveform shapes. One is sinusoidal, and two have a square shape, including dwell periods and sinusoidal slopes. Special focus lies on heat build-up, which is substantial, especially for large loads, high frequencies and/or highly filled rubber blends. Plateau temperatures are determined for various loading conditions and rubber blends. A very simple linear relationship with dissipated energy per time and unit area is obtained. Results gathered with dynamic mechanical analyses show, likewise, a linear trend, but the heat build-up is very small, due to different sample geometries. Full article

Other

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Open AccessConcept Paper Non-Destructive Thermography Analysis of Impact Damage on Large-Scale CFRP Automotive Parts
Materials 2014, 7(1), 413-429; doi:10.3390/ma7010413
Received: 30 September 2013 / Revised: 28 November 2013 / Accepted: 6 January 2014 / Published: 14 January 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1156 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Laminated composites are increasingly used in aeronautics and the wind energy industry, as well as in the automotive industry. In these applications, the construction and processing need to fulfill the highest requirements regarding weight and mechanical properties. Environmental issues, like fuel consumption [...] Read more.
Laminated composites are increasingly used in aeronautics and the wind energy industry, as well as in the automotive industry. In these applications, the construction and processing need to fulfill the highest requirements regarding weight and mechanical properties. Environmental issues, like fuel consumption and CO2-footprint, set new challenges in producing lightweight parts that meet the highly monitored standards for these branches. In the automotive industry, one main aspect of construction is the impact behavior of structural parts. To verify the quality of parts made from composite materials with little effort, cost and time, non-destructive test methods are increasingly used. A highly recommended non-destructive testing method is thermography analysis. In this work, a prototype for a car’s base plate was produced by using vacuum infusion. For research work, testing specimens were produced with the same multi-layer build up as the prototypes. These specimens were charged with defined loads in impact tests to simulate the effect of stone chips. Afterwards, the impacted specimens were investigated with thermography analysis. The research results in that work will help to understand the possible fields of application and the usage of thermography analysis as the first quick and economic failure detection method for automotive parts. Full article

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