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Special Issue "Porous Monolithic Materials for Applications in Separation Science"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Porous Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dermot Brabazon

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +353866094221
Interests: laser processing; material processing; material functionalisation; nanostructured materials; rapid prototyping; chromatography
Guest Editor
Dr. Mercedes Vázquez

School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: separation science; sample extraction; monoliths; microfluidics; rapid prototyping; electrochemical detection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, We have the pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to the forthcoming Special Issue “Porous monolithic materials for applications in separation science” in Materials. In the last two decades, porous monolithic materials have found widespread application in the field of analytical chemistry. Due to their high porosity and hydraulic permeability, as well as high specific surface area and wide range of surface chemistries available, they offer an excellent alternative to conventional particulate materials in flow-through applications such as chromatographic analysis and solid phase extraction (SPE). For instance, faster separations/extractions can be performed at lower back-pressures with monolithic columns as compared to packed columns. Thermal or photoinitiated polymerisation and photografting techniques can be also used for monolith preparation and subsequent functionalisation of monolithic materials in specific areas of a capillary or a microchannel without the need for column frits. In this special issue, the latest developments in preparation, characterisation and application of porous monolithic materials in separation science and technology will be presented. Porous polymer, silica and carbon-based monoliths will be considered along with related gels and hydrogels. New characterisation methods and approaches, such as 3D imaging and reconstruction of monoliths, will be of particular interest. Applications in liquid and gas chromatography, electrochromatography and sample preparation (e.g., preconcentration, purification, extraction) will be covered in various formats, e.g., in bulk, capillary or microfluidic channel format. Monolith-based microfluidic components, such as micro-valves, micro-mixers, micro-pumps and electrospray emitters, employed in microfluidic-based separations/extractions are also relevant for this Special Issue. Should you need any further information about this Special Issue, please do not hesitate to contact us. Dr. Mercedes VázquezProf. Dermot BrabazonGuest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

Porous monoliths Polymer monoliths Silica monoliths Carbon monoliths Chromatographic applications Sample preparation applications Solid phase extraction Microfluidic applications Characterisation techniques 3D reconstruction

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication Synthesis of Porous Carbon Monoliths Using Hard Templates
Materials 2016, 9(3), 214; doi:10.3390/ma9030214
Received: 19 November 2015 / Revised: 15 March 2016 / Accepted: 16 March 2016 / Published: 21 March 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4553 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The preparation of porous carbon monoliths with a defined shape via template-assisted routes is reported. Monoliths made from porous concrete and zeolite were each used as the template. The porous concrete-derived carbon monoliths exhibited high gravimetric specific surface areas up to 2000 m
[...] Read more.
The preparation of porous carbon monoliths with a defined shape via template-assisted routes is reported. Monoliths made from porous concrete and zeolite were each used as the template. The porous concrete-derived carbon monoliths exhibited high gravimetric specific surface areas up to 2000 m2·g−1. The pore system comprised macro-, meso-, and micropores. These pores were hierarchically arranged. The pore system was created by the complex interplay of the actions of both the template and the activating agent as well. On the other hand, zeolite-made template shapes allowed for the preparation of microporous carbon monoliths with a high volumetric specific surface area. This feature could be beneficial if carbon monoliths must be integrated into technical systems under space-limited conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Porous Monolithic Materials for Applications in Separation Science)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Polystyrene-co-Divinylbenzene PolyHIPE Monoliths in 1.0 mm Column Formats for Liquid Chromatography
Materials 2016, 9(3), 212; doi:10.3390/ma9030212
Received: 18 January 2016 / Revised: 26 February 2016 / Accepted: 15 March 2016 / Published: 18 March 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2064 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reversed phase liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation of small molecules using a polystyrene-co-divinylbenzene (PS-co-DVB) polyHIPE stationary phases housed within 1.0 mm i.d. silcosteel columns is presented within this study. A 90% PS-co-DVB polyHIPE was covalently attached to
[...] Read more.
The reversed phase liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation of small molecules using a polystyrene-co-divinylbenzene (PS-co-DVB) polyHIPE stationary phases housed within 1.0 mm i.d. silcosteel columns is presented within this study. A 90% PS-co-DVB polyHIPE was covalently attached to the walls of the column housing by prior wall modification with 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate and could withstand operating backpressures in excess of 200 bar at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min. Permeability studies revealed that the monolith swelled slightly in 100% acetonitrile relative to 100% water but could nevertheless be used to separate five alkylbenzenes using a flow rate of 40 µL/min (linear velocity: 0.57 mm/s). Remarkable column-to-column reproducibility is shown with retention factor variation between 2.6% and 6.1% for two separately prepared columns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Porous Monolithic Materials for Applications in Separation Science)
Open AccessArticle Mechanisms of Competitive Adsorption Organic Pollutants on Hexylene-Bridged Polysilsesquioxane
Materials 2015, 8(9), 5806-5817; doi:10.3390/ma8095275
Received: 15 July 2015 / Revised: 20 August 2015 / Accepted: 21 August 2015 / Published: 31 August 2015
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (816 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hexylene-bridged periodic mesoporous polysilsesquioxanes (HBPMS) are a promising new class of adsorbent for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solutions. These hybrid organic-inorganic materials have a larger BET surface area of 897 m2·g−1 accessible through a cubic, isotropic network of 3.82-nm diameter
[...] Read more.
Hexylene-bridged periodic mesoporous polysilsesquioxanes (HBPMS) are a promising new class of adsorbent for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solutions. These hybrid organic-inorganic materials have a larger BET surface area of 897 m2·g−1 accessible through a cubic, isotropic network of 3.82-nm diameter pores. The hexylene bridging group provides enhanced adsorption of organic molecules while the bridged polysilsesquioxane structure permits sufficient silanols that are hydrophilic to be retained. In this study, adsorption of phenanthrene (PHEN), 2,4-Dichlorophenol (DCP), and nitrobenzene (NBZ) with HBPMS materials was studied to ascertain the relative contributions to adsorption performance from (1) direct competition for sites and (2) pore blockage. A conceptual model was proposed to further explain the phenomena. This study suggests a promising application of cubic mesoporous BPS in wastewater treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Porous Monolithic Materials for Applications in Separation Science)

Review

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Open AccessReview Methacrylate Polymer Monoliths for Separation Applications
Materials 2016, 9(6), 446; doi:10.3390/ma9060446
Received: 8 April 2016 / Revised: 10 May 2016 / Accepted: 20 May 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4507 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review summarizes the development of methacrylate-based polymer monoliths for separation science applications. An introduction to monoliths is presented, followed by the preparation methods and characteristics specific to methacrylate monoliths. Both traditional chemical based syntheses and emerging additive manufacturing methods are presented along
[...] Read more.
This review summarizes the development of methacrylate-based polymer monoliths for separation science applications. An introduction to monoliths is presented, followed by the preparation methods and characteristics specific to methacrylate monoliths. Both traditional chemical based syntheses and emerging additive manufacturing methods are presented along with an analysis of the different types of functional groups, which have been utilized with methacrylate monoliths. The role of methacrylate based porous materials in separation science in industrially important chemical and biological separations are discussed, with particular attention given to the most recent developments and challenges associated with these materials. While these monoliths have been shown to be useful for a wide variety of applications, there is still scope for exerting better control over the porous architectures and chemistries obtained from the different fabrication routes. Conclusions regarding this previous work are drawn and an outlook towards future challenges and potential developments in this vibrant research area are presented. Discussed in particular are the potential of additive manufacturing for the preparation of monolithic structures with pre-defined multi-scale porous morphologies and for the optimization of surface reactive chemistries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Porous Monolithic Materials for Applications in Separation Science)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessFeature PaperTechnical Note Fabrication of a GMA-co-EDMA Monolith in a 2.0 mm i.d. Polypropylene Housing
Materials 2016, 9(4), 263; doi:10.3390/ma9040263
Received: 17 January 2016 / Revised: 8 March 2016 / Accepted: 23 March 2016 / Published: 31 March 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2571 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polymers are interesting housing materials for the fabrication of inexpensive monolithic chromatography and solid phase extraction (SPE) devices. Challenges arise when polymeric monoliths are formed in non-conical, cylindrical tubes of larger diameter due to potential monolith detachment from the housing wall resulting in
[...] Read more.
Polymers are interesting housing materials for the fabrication of inexpensive monolithic chromatography and solid phase extraction (SPE) devices. Challenges arise when polymeric monoliths are formed in non-conical, cylindrical tubes of larger diameter due to potential monolith detachment from the housing wall resulting in loss of separation performance and mechanical stability. Here, a two-step protocol is applied to ensure formation of robust homogeneous methacrylate monolith in polypropylene (PP) tubing with a diameter of 2.0 mm. Detailed Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging confirm the successful pre-modification of the tubing wall with an anchoring layer of cross-linked ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA). Subsequent formation of an EDMA-glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monolith in the PP tube resulted in a homogeneous monolithic polymer with enhanced mechanical stability as compared to non-anchored monoliths. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Porous Monolithic Materials for Applications in Separation Science)

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