E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alkiviadis Paipetis

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, 45110, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Composite Materials; Composite Interfaces; Micromechanics; Mechanical behaviour; Non-destructive evaluation; Hybrid-Nano Composites; Self healing Materials; Structural Health Monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stress wave propagation in advanced materials and structures has been in the forefront of research for several decades. However, the complexity of propagation phenomena, together with the multiplicity of propagated modes and their interaction with the propagation medium, always provides a fertile ground for new developments, particularly in relation with novel materials, which often possess designed architecture. These developments may range from first principle modeling to advanced technological and diagnostic tools for life cycle assessment and structural health monitoring of materials and structures.

Within the scope of this special issue is the compilation of key contributions related but not limited to: Linear and non Linear Ultrasonics and Imaging, Acoustic Emission, Acoustic Microscopy, Surface and Guided Waves, Non Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring, Wave Propagation Modelling and Inverse Problems in Wave Propagation, Signal Processing. Contributions should be related to advanced materials, such as materials with microstructure, controlled architecture and anisotropy, composites and laminar structures, phononic metamaterials, etc.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit original research papers within the scope of this Special Issue. Short communication and authoritative reviews will also be considered for publication.

Alkiviadis S. Paipetis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Identification of Material Parameters for the Simulation of Acoustic Absorption of Fouled Sintered Fiber Felts
Materials 2016, 9(8), 709; doi:10.3390/ma9080709
Received: 30 May 2016 / Revised: 25 July 2016 / Accepted: 5 August 2016 / Published: 22 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As a reaction to the increasing noise pollution, caused by the expansion of airports close to residential areas, porous trailing edges are investigated to reduce the aeroacoustic noise produced by flow around the airframe. Besides mechanical and acoustical investigations of porous materials, the
[...] Read more.
As a reaction to the increasing noise pollution, caused by the expansion of airports close to residential areas, porous trailing edges are investigated to reduce the aeroacoustic noise produced by flow around the airframe. Besides mechanical and acoustical investigations of porous materials, the fouling behavior of promising materials is an important aspect to estimate the performance in long-term use. For this study, two sintered fiber felts were selected for a long-term fouling experiment where the development of the flow resistivity and accumulation of dirt was observed. Based on 3D structural characterizations obtained from X-ray tomography of the initial materials, acoustic models (Biot and Johnson–Champoux–Allard) in the frame of the transfer matrix method were applied to the sintered fiber felts. Flow resistivity measurements and the measurements of the absorption coefficient in an impedance tube are the basis for a fouling model for sintered fiber felts. The contribution will conclude with recommendations concerning the modeling of pollution processes of porous materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Transverse Crack Detection in 3D Angle Interlock Glass Fibre Composites Using Acoustic Emission
Materials 2016, 9(8), 699; doi:10.3390/ma9080699
Received: 31 May 2016 / Revised: 4 August 2016 / Accepted: 12 August 2016 / Published: 16 August 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (6056 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In addition to manufacturing cost and production rates, damage resistance has become a major issue for the composites industry. Three-dimensional (3D) woven composites have superior through-thickness properties compared to two-dimensional (2D) laminates, for example, improved impact damage resistance, high interlaminar fracture toughness and
[...] Read more.
In addition to manufacturing cost and production rates, damage resistance has become a major issue for the composites industry. Three-dimensional (3D) woven composites have superior through-thickness properties compared to two-dimensional (2D) laminates, for example, improved impact damage resistance, high interlaminar fracture toughness and reduced notch sensitivity. The performance of 3D woven preforms is dependent on the fabric architecture, which is determined by the binding pattern. For this study, angle interlock (AI) structures with through-thickness binding were manufactured. The AI cracking simulation shows that the transverse component is the one that leads to transverse matrix cracking in the weft yarn under tensile loading. Monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) during mechanical loading is an effective tool in the study of damage processes in glass fiber-reinforced composites. Tests were performed with piezoelectric sensors bonded on a tensile specimen acting as passive receivers of AE signals. An experimental data has been generated which was useful to validate the multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), providing insight into the damage behaviour of novel 3D AI glass fibre composites. MP-FEM and experimental data showed that transverse crack generated a predominant flexural mode A0 and also a less energetic extensional mode S0. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Acoustic Emission of Deformation Twinning in Magnesium
Materials 2016, 9(8), 662; doi:10.3390/ma9080662
Received: 16 June 2016 / Revised: 27 July 2016 / Accepted: 28 July 2016 / Published: 6 August 2016
PDF Full-text (9631 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Acoustic Emission of deformation twinning in Magnesium is investigated in this article. Single crystal testing with combined full field deformation measurements, as well as polycrystalline testing inside the scanning electron microscope with simultaneous monitoring of texture evolution and twin nucleation were compared
[...] Read more.
The Acoustic Emission of deformation twinning in Magnesium is investigated in this article. Single crystal testing with combined full field deformation measurements, as well as polycrystalline testing inside the scanning electron microscope with simultaneous monitoring of texture evolution and twin nucleation were compared to testing at the laboratory scale with respect to recordings of Acoustic Emission activity. Single crystal testing revealed the formation of layered twin boundaries in areas of strain localization which was accompanied by distinct changes in the acoustic data. Testing inside the microscope directly showed twin nucleation, proliferation and growth as well as associated crystallographic reorientations. A post processing approach of the Acoustic Emission activity revealed the existence of a class of signals that appears in a strain range in which twinning is profuse, as validated by the in situ and ex situ microscopy observations. Features extracted from such activity were cross-correlated both with the available mechanical and microscopy data, as well as with the Acoustic Emission activity recorded at the laboratory scale for similarly prepared specimens. The overall approach demonstrates that the method of Acoustic Emission could provide real time volumetric information related to the activation of deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys, in spite of the complexity of the propagation phenomena, the possible activation of several deformation modes and the challenges posed by the sensing approach itself when applied in this type of materials evaluation approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Calibration Methods of Acoustic Emission Sensors
Materials 2016, 9(7), 508; doi:10.3390/ma9070508
Received: 30 May 2016 / Revised: 16 June 2016 / Accepted: 20 June 2016 / Published: 24 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (24047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
This study examined outstanding issues of sensitivity calibration methods for ultrasonic and acoustic emission transducers and provides workable solutions based on physically measureable quantities, laser-based displacement measurement in particular. This leads to mutually consistent determination of transmitting and receiving sensitivities of sensors and
[...] Read more.
This study examined outstanding issues of sensitivity calibration methods for ultrasonic and acoustic emission transducers and provides workable solutions based on physically measureable quantities, laser-based displacement measurement in particular. This leads to mutually consistent determination of transmitting and receiving sensitivities of sensors and transducers. Methods of circumventing problems of extraneous vibrations on free transmitters are used, giving the foundation for face-to-face calibration methods. Working on many ultrasonic and acoustic emission transducers, their receiving and transmitting sensitivities are found to be always different, while their ratios exhibit unexpected similarity. This behavior is attributed to monopolar pulse generation and bipolar received signals due to electrical charge transfer during elastic wave motion and reflection on the back face. This is verified through a quantitative piezoelectric sensing experiment. Displacement vs. velocity calibration terminology is clarified, redefining the “V/µbar” reference for contact sensor calibration. With demonstrated differences in the transmitting and receiving sensitivities of transducers, the requirement of the Hill-Adams equation invalidates the basic premise of the currently formulated reciprocity calibration methods for acoustic emission transducers. In addition, the measured reciprocity parameter for the case of through-transmission significantly deviates from the approximate theoretical prediction. It is demonstrated that three methods provide reliable sensor calibration results that are complimentary among them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Figures

Figure 1a

Open AccessCommunication Experimental Ultrasound Transmission through Fluid-Solid and Air-Solid Phononic Plates
Materials 2016, 9(6), 453; doi:10.3390/ma9060453
Received: 22 April 2016 / Revised: 31 May 2016 / Accepted: 3 June 2016 / Published: 7 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4991 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Underwater ultrasonic transmissions for fluid-solid and air-solid phononic brass plates are reported in this work. Although the structure is roughly the same, experimental results show very different behaviour between fluid-solid and air-solid phononic plates, due to most of the properties of the fluid-solid
[...] Read more.
Underwater ultrasonic transmissions for fluid-solid and air-solid phononic brass plates are reported in this work. Although the structure is roughly the same, experimental results show very different behaviour between fluid-solid and air-solid phononic plates, due to most of the properties of the fluid-solid perforated plates rely on Fabry-Perot resonances, Wood anomalies and Lamb modes. In air-solid phononic plates Fabry-Perot resonance is highly attenuated due to impedances difference between air and water, and therefore some transmission modes are now distinguishable due to surface modes coupling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Propagation of Ultrasonic Guided Waves in Composite Multi-Wire Ropes
Materials 2016, 9(6), 451; doi:10.3390/ma9060451
Received: 17 April 2016 / Revised: 24 May 2016 / Accepted: 1 June 2016 / Published: 6 June 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (17715 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Multi-wire ropes are widely used as load-carrying constructional elements in bridges, cranes, elevators, etc. Structural integrity of such ropes can be inspected by using non-destructive ultrasonic techniques. The objective of this work was to investigate propagation of ultrasonic guided waves (UGW) along
[...] Read more.
Multi-wire ropes are widely used as load-carrying constructional elements in bridges, cranes, elevators, etc. Structural integrity of such ropes can be inspected by using non-destructive ultrasonic techniques. The objective of this work was to investigate propagation of ultrasonic guided waves (UGW) along composite multi-wire ropes in the cases of various types of acoustic contacts between neighboring wires and the plastic core. The modes of UGW propagating along the multi-wire ropes were identified using modelling, the dispersion curves were calculated using analytical and semi-analytical finite element (SAFE) techniques. In order to investigate the effects of UGW propagation, the two types of the acoustic contact between neighboring wires were simulated using the 3D finite element method (FE) as well. The key question of investigation was estimation of the actual boundary conditions between neighboring wires (solid or slip) and the real depth of penetration of UGW into the overall cross-section of the rope. Therefore, in order to verify the results of FE modelling, the guided wave penetration into strands of multi-wire rope was investigated experimentally. The performed modelling and experimental investigation enabled us to select optimal parameters of UGW to be used for non-destructive testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Open AccessArticle The Simple Lamb Wave Analysis to Characterize Concrete Wide Beams by the Practical MASW Test
Materials 2016, 9(6), 437; doi:10.3390/ma9060437
Received: 9 April 2016 / Revised: 9 May 2016 / Accepted: 27 May 2016 / Published: 2 June 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6941 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, the Lamb wave analysis by the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) for concrete structures has been an effective nondestructive evaluation, such as the condition assessment and dimension identification by the elastic wave velocities and their reflections from boundaries. This
[...] Read more.
In recent years, the Lamb wave analysis by the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) for concrete structures has been an effective nondestructive evaluation, such as the condition assessment and dimension identification by the elastic wave velocities and their reflections from boundaries. This study proposes an effective Lamb wave analysis by the practical application of MASW to concrete wide beams in an easy and simple manner in order to identify the dimension and elastic wave velocity (R-wave) for the condition assessment (e.g., the estimation of elastic properties). This is done by identifying the zero-order antisymmetric (A0) and first-order symmetric (S1) modes among multimodal Lamb waves. The MASW data were collected on eight concrete wide beams and compared to the actual depth and to the pressure (P-) wave velocities collected for the same specimen. Information is extracted from multimodal Lamb wave dispersion curves to obtain the elastic stiffness parameters and the thickness of the concrete structures. Due to the simple and cost-effective procedure associated with the MASW processing technique, the characteristics of several fundamental modes in the experimental Lamb wave dispersion curves could be measured. Available reference data are in good agreement with the parameters that were determined by our analysis scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Computational Study of the Effect of Cortical Porosity on Ultrasound Wave Propagation in Healthy and Osteoporotic Long Bones
Materials 2016, 9(3), 205; doi:10.3390/ma9030205
Received: 23 January 2016 / Revised: 23 February 2016 / Accepted: 8 March 2016 / Published: 17 March 2016
PDF Full-text (4835 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Computational studies on the evaluation of bone status in cases of pathologies have gained significant interest in recent years. This work presents a parametric and systematic numerical study on ultrasound propagation in cortical bone models to investigate the effect of changes in cortical
[...] Read more.
Computational studies on the evaluation of bone status in cases of pathologies have gained significant interest in recent years. This work presents a parametric and systematic numerical study on ultrasound propagation in cortical bone models to investigate the effect of changes in cortical porosity and the occurrence of large basic multicellular units, simply called non-refilled resorption lacunae (RL), on the velocity of the first arriving signal (FAS). Two-dimensional geometries of cortical bone are established for various microstructural models mimicking normal and pathological tissue states. Emphasis is given on the detection of RL formation which may provoke the thinning of the cortical cortex and the increase of porosity at a later stage of the disease. The central excitation frequencies 0.5 and 1 MHz are examined. The proposed configuration consists of one point source and multiple successive receivers in order to calculate the FAS velocity in small propagation paths (local velocity) and derive a variation profile along the cortical surface. It was shown that: (a) the local FAS velocity can capture porosity changes including the occurrence of RL with different number, size and depth of formation; and (b) the excitation frequency 0.5 MHz is more sensitive for the assessment of cortical microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustic Waves in Advanced Materials)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Materials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Materials Edit a special issue Review for Materials
logo
loading...
Back to Top