Special Issue "Bringing Personalized Medicine into Clinical Practice"

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A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Lori A. Orlando
Duke Center for Personalized Medicine & Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, 3475 Erwin Road, Wallace Clinic Ste 204, Durham, NC 27705, USA
Website: http://www.genome.duke.edu/directory/faculty/orlando/
E-Mail: lorlando@duke.edu
Interests: implementation research; primary care; decision modeling; cost-effectiveness; family health history; family history; health services research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concepts of personalized medicine have been around for decades, but in the 10 years following the full sequencing of the human genome there has been an explosion of research into methods and tools to further personalize patient care. Some of these, particularly in the field of oncology, have been readily adopted into clinical practice; but most have yet to be integrated into mainstream clinical care. This issue of the Journal of Personalized Medicine will highlight research that is leading the way in bringing Personalized Medicine tools, including risk stratification, family health history, genetics, or genomics, into the clinic. These studies should present data related to important concepts such as adoption barriers and solutions, education, and/or implementation to promote dissemination and broad uptake of these tools.

Dr. Lori A. Orlando
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • risk stratification
  • family health history
  • implementation
  • genetics
  • genomics
  • education
  • barriers
  • clinic
  • providers

Published Papers (9 papers)

J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 176-199; doi:10.3390/jpm4020176
Received: 11 December 2013; in revised form: 22 February 2014 / Accepted: 14 March 2014 / Published: 4 April 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 163-175; doi:10.3390/jpm4020163
Received: 25 November 2013; in revised form: 8 March 2014 / Accepted: 26 March 2014 / Published: 4 April 2014
Show/Hide Abstract | Download PDF Full-text (735 KB) | View HTML Full-text | Download XML Full-text |  Supplementary Files

J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 147-162; doi:10.3390/jpm4020147
Received: 19 December 2013; in revised form: 4 March 2014 / Accepted: 17 March 2014 / Published: 27 March 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 137-146; doi:10.3390/jpm4020137
Received: 2 December 2013; in revised form: 17 February 2014 / Accepted: 21 February 2014 / Published: 27 March 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 115-136; doi:10.3390/jpm4020115
Received: 10 December 2013; in revised form: 1 March 2014 / Accepted: 3 March 2014 / Published: 26 March 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(1), 79-87; doi:10.3390/jpm4010079
Received: 13 December 2013; in revised form: 6 March 2014 / Accepted: 7 March 2014 / Published: 18 March 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(1), 35-49; doi:10.3390/jpm4010035
Received: 11 December 2013; in revised form: 31 January 2014 / Accepted: 12 February 2014 / Published: 27 February 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(1), 20-34; doi:10.3390/jpm4010020
Received: 27 November 2013; in revised form: 5 January 2014 / Accepted: 7 January 2014 / Published: 18 February 2014
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J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(1), 1-19; doi:10.3390/jpm4010001
Received: 8 December 2013; in revised form: 19 December 2013 / Accepted: 20 December 2013 / Published: 8 January 2014
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Barriers and motivators for physician referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer genetic services: A qualitative study
Authors: Yen Y Tan and Lisa F Fitzgerald
Affiliation: The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Abstract:
Identification and referral of individuals at risk for Lynch syndrome is crucial since surveillance programs effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. Data have, however, shown that Lynch syndrome is under-diagnosed, even when patients have clear criteria unrelated to family history. In this paper, we explored variables, which may impact a physician’s referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome for cancer genetic services.
Methods
: Using a purposive maximum variation sampling strategy, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 28 physicians in care of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome between March and August 2011. General practitioners and medical specialists were recruited in a major metropolitan area in Australia. Interview transcripts were reviewed by two independent researchers, and thematic analysis was performed using NVivo10 data analysis software.
Results
: The main barriers and motivators identified were: (1) physician-related (e.g. familiarity with Lynch syndrome and family history knowledge); (2) patient-related (e.g. patient interests and personal experience with cancer); and (3) organizational-related (e.g. access to services, guidelines and referral pathway).
Conclusions
: Physician referral of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome to cancer s services is motivated and hindered by a range of individual, interpersonal and organizational factors. In order to improve the care and quality of life of patients and family with suspected Lynch syndrome, further research is needed to develop supportive needs for physicians.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Knowledge, attitude and referral patterns of Lynch syndrome: A survey of clinicians in Australia
Authors: Yen Y Tan, Amanda B Spurdle and Andreas Obermair
Affiliation: The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Abstract:
To elicit trends in referral across specialty by surveying clinicians’ about Lynch-associated cancer risks, and tumour analysis in the identification of Lynch syndrome; their attitudes towards genetic services; and their referral preferences, perceived role, and needs for delivering genetic services in routine clinical practice.
Methods
: Members of the Medical Association and Clinical Oncology Society in Australia who are likely to diagnose, treat and assess Lynch families in Australia were invited via email to participate in an online survey.
Results
: A total of 144 respondents, including 59 oncologists, 27 surgeons, 24 gynaecologists, 18 general practitioners and 11 gastroenterologists, completed the online survey. Most respondents demonstrated suboptimal knowledge of Lynch syndrome. Male general practitioners who have been practicing for ≥10 years were less likely to offer genetic referral than specialists, and many medical practitioners did not clearly recognize that IHC testing is not a germline test. General practitioners did not feel that their role is to identify patients for genetic referral or to order tumour testing. A majority of clinicians considered everyone is responsible for making the initial referral to genetic services, but a small preference was given to oncologists (15%) and general practitioners (13%). A majority of respondents preferred patient information brochure, continuing genetic education programs and referral guidelines as support for practice.
Conclusion
: Targeted educational interventions for general practitioners and specialists should be considered to increase knowledge and improve referral. An online family history assessment tool with built-in decision support would be helpful in triaging high-risk individuals for pathology analysis and/or genetic assessment in general practice.

Last update: 19 November 2013

J. Pers. Med. EISSN 2075-4426 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert