Special Issue "Serious Games and Applications for Health (SeGAH 2017)"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information and Communications Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Nuno Dias

Digital Games Research Center, Polytechnic Institute of Cávado and Ave, Barcelos, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: neuroengineering; EEG; brain–machine interface
Guest Editor
Prof. Sara de Freitas

Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: technology enhanced learning; educational leadership; learning analytics; online learning; educational games
Guest Editor
Prof. Nuno Rodrigues

Digital Games Research Center, Polytechnic Institute of Cávado and Ave, Barcelos, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: software architecture; serious games; applications for health
Guest Editor
Prof. João L. Vilaça

Biomedical Engineering Solutions Research Group, Polytechnic Institute of Cávado and Ave, Barcelos, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: medical imaging; serious games; guided surgery; robotics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The overall objectives of SeGAH 2017 are the discussion and sharing of knowledge, experiences and scientific and technical results, related to state-of-the-art solutions, technologies and applications of serious games in health and healthcare, as well as the demonstration of advanced products and technologies for health. We believe that SeGAH which will be held in Perth, Australia, from 2–4 April, 2017, will further enlighten the audience of this conference which will effectively promote submission of more stimulating articles. Authors of SeGAH 2017 proceedings papers are therefore invited to submit extended versions of their papers with new input/angles to the Special Issue “Serious Games and Applications for Health” of the journal Information—Open Access Information Science Journal (I-OAISJ). However, authors interested in extending their conference papers must be aware that the final submitted manuscript must provide a minimum of 50% new content and not exceed 30% copy/paste from the proceedings paper. Each manuscript will be blind reviewed by I-OAISJ academic editors.

Prof. Nuno Dias
Prof. Sara de Freitas
Prof. Nuno Rodrigues
Prof. João L. Vilaça
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Serious games
  • Applications for health
  • Virtual reality
  • Wearable technology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Mobile Mixed Reality for Experiential Learning and Simulation in Medical and Health Sciences Education
Information 2018, 9(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9020031
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 8 January 2018 / Accepted: 27 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
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Abstract
New accessible learning methods delivered through mobile mixed reality are becoming possible in education, shifting pedagogy from the use of two dimensional images and videos to facilitating learning via interactive mobile environments. This is especially important in medical and health education, where the
[...] Read more.
New accessible learning methods delivered through mobile mixed reality are becoming possible in education, shifting pedagogy from the use of two dimensional images and videos to facilitating learning via interactive mobile environments. This is especially important in medical and health education, where the required knowledge acquisition is typically much more experiential, self-directed, and hands-on than in many other disciplines. Presented are insights obtained from the implementation and testing of two mobile mixed reality interventions across two Australian higher education classrooms in medicine and health sciences, concentrating on student perceptions of mobile mixed reality for learning physiology and anatomy in a face-to-face medical and health science classroom and skills acquisition in airways management focusing on direct laryngoscopy with foreign body removal in a distance paramedic science classroom. This is unique because most studies focus on a single discipline, focusing on either skills or the learner experience and a single delivery modality rather than linking cross-discipline knowledge acquisition and the development of a student’s tangible skills across multimodal classrooms. Outcomes are presented from post-intervention student interviews and discipline academic observation, which highlight improvements in learner motivation and skills, but also demonstrated pedagogical challenges to overcome with mobile mixed reality learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Serious Games and Applications for Health (SeGAH 2017))
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Open AccessArticle Pedagogy before Technology: A Design-Based Research Approach to Enhancing Skills Development in Paramedic Science Using Mixed Reality
Information 2018, 9(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9020029
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 19 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
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Abstract
In health sciences education, there is growing evidence that simulation improves learners’ safety, competence, and skills, especially when compared to traditional didactic methods or no simulation training. However, this approach to simulation becomes difficult when students are studying at a distance, leading to
[...] Read more.
In health sciences education, there is growing evidence that simulation improves learners’ safety, competence, and skills, especially when compared to traditional didactic methods or no simulation training. However, this approach to simulation becomes difficult when students are studying at a distance, leading to the need to develop simulations that suit this pedagogical problem and the logistics of this intervention method. This paper describes the use of a design-based research (DBR) methodology, combined with a new model for putting ‘pedagogy before technology’ when approaching these types of education problems, to develop a mixed reality education solution. This combined model is used to analyse a classroom learning problem in paramedic health sciences with respect to student evidence, assisting the educational designer to identify a solution, and subsequently develop a technology-based mixed reality simulation via a mobile phone application and three-dimensional (3D) printed tools to provide an analogue approximation for an on-campus simulation experience. The developed intervention was tested with students and refined through a repeat of the process, showing that a DBR process, supported by a model that puts ‘pedagogy before technology’, can produce over several iterations a much-improved simulation that results in a simulation that satisfies student pedagogical needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Serious Games and Applications for Health (SeGAH 2017))
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