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Information 2018, 9(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9020031

Mobile Mixed Reality for Experiential Learning and Simulation in Medical and Health Sciences Education

1
Faculty of Society and Design, Bond University, Robina QLD 4226, Australia
2
Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina QLD 4226, Australia
3
School of Engineering & Technology, Central Queensland University, Brisbane QLD 4000, Australia
4
Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina QLD 4226, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 8 January 2018 / Accepted: 27 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Serious Games and Applications for Health (SeGAH 2017))
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Abstract

New accessible learning methods delivered through mobile mixed reality are becoming possible in education, shifting pedagogy from the use of two dimensional images and videos to facilitating learning via interactive mobile environments. This is especially important in medical and health education, where the required knowledge acquisition is typically much more experiential, self-directed, and hands-on than in many other disciplines. Presented are insights obtained from the implementation and testing of two mobile mixed reality interventions across two Australian higher education classrooms in medicine and health sciences, concentrating on student perceptions of mobile mixed reality for learning physiology and anatomy in a face-to-face medical and health science classroom and skills acquisition in airways management focusing on direct laryngoscopy with foreign body removal in a distance paramedic science classroom. This is unique because most studies focus on a single discipline, focusing on either skills or the learner experience and a single delivery modality rather than linking cross-discipline knowledge acquisition and the development of a student’s tangible skills across multimodal classrooms. Outcomes are presented from post-intervention student interviews and discipline academic observation, which highlight improvements in learner motivation and skills, but also demonstrated pedagogical challenges to overcome with mobile mixed reality learning. View Full-Text
Keywords: mixed reality; mobile learning; experiential learning; augmented reality; virtual reality; 3D printing; distance education; paramedic science; simulation; medical education mixed reality; mobile learning; experiential learning; augmented reality; virtual reality; 3D printing; distance education; paramedic science; simulation; medical education
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Birt, J.; Stromberga, Z.; Cowling, M.; Moro, C. Mobile Mixed Reality for Experiential Learning and Simulation in Medical and Health Sciences Education. Information 2018, 9, 31.

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