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Special Issue "Family Violence"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Catrin Finkenauer

Universiteit Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 1, Room H234A, 3584 CS UTRECHT, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31 30 253 2384
Interests: interpersonal dynamics and relationships, including parent-child relationships, intimate relationships, and friendships; secrecy, disclosure, privacy invasion, trust, self-control, family violence, divorce, and child abuse
Guest Editor
Ms. Yayouk E. Willems

Universiteit Utrecht, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31 20 59 84 382
Interests: child development and gene environment interaction, self-control, family conflict, domestic violence, high-conflict divorce

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Millions of people worldwide experience family violence in all its forms (interpersonal violence, child maltreatment, elder abuse, sexual violence). About 275 million children experience child abuse and witness interparental violence every year. One in 3 women in relationships throughout the world experiences interpersonal violence during their lifetime. Beyond the immediate mental and physical harm, exposure to family violence is one of the most important risk factors for physical disease, psychopathology, professional and academic failure, delinquency, substance use, suicide and other adverse outcomes across the life course. Also, exposure to family violence during childhood and adolescence predicts people’s use of violence themselves. Given the high prevalence of family violence and striking figures on associated risks for health and wellbeing, family violence poses a large economic burden and challenge to society and health care.

Despite significant advances, mechanisms explaining associations between family violence and psychosocial problems remain largely unknown, which hinders explaining and predicting family violence and, importantly, hampers the development of effective interventions. Therefore, this special issue is intended to highlight new directions in the study of family violence that set an agenda for research. In this special issue, we are interested in original research, case studies, and review articles examining the mechanisms, interpersonal dynamics, and influence of larger social contexts (neighbourhood violence, war) that give rise to family conflict and violence. We also welcome work that moves family violence to the realm of public health. Topics may include but are not limited to: interparental violence, child maltreatment, parent-child conflict, sibling interactions, intimate partner conflict, high-conflict divorce, and elder abuse. We welcome research from various perspectives and disciplines and will give priority to innovative contributions to any aspect of family violence. The goal of this Special Issue is to form a repository of current and diverse work investigating a diversity of mechanisms and processes giving rise to family violence.

This open access journal is a peer-reviewed and PubMed listed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Prof. Dr. Catrin Finkenauer
Ms. Yayouk E. Willems
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Family violence
  • Relational escalations
  • Intimate partner conflict
  • Parent-child conflict
  • Relationship
  • Mechanisms
  • Intervention
  • Mental health
  • Interpersonal dynamics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Sexual Violence against Women in Germany: Prevalence and Risk Markers
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1613; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081613
Received: 8 June 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 30 July 2018
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Abstract
Previous research has repeatedly shown that gender-based violence affects a considerable proportion of women in any given population. Apart from providing current estimates of the prevalence of sexual violence against women in Germany, we identified specific risk markers applying an advanced statistical method.
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Previous research has repeatedly shown that gender-based violence affects a considerable proportion of women in any given population. Apart from providing current estimates of the prevalence of sexual violence against women in Germany, we identified specific risk markers applying an advanced statistical method. We analyzed data from a survey of N = 4450 women representative of the German population, conducted by the Criminological Research Institute of Lower Saxony in 2011. Lifetime prevalence for experiencing sexual violence was 5.4% for women aged 21–40 years (five-year prevalence: 2.5%). Non-parametric conditional inference tree (C-Tree) analyses revealed that physical and sexual abuse during childhood as well as being divorced, separated, or widowed was the most informative constellation of risk markers, increasing the five-year prevalence rate of experienced sexual violence victimizations up to 17.0%. Furthermore, knowing about the official penalization of marital rape was related to a lower victimization risk for women without a history of parental violence. Possible explanations for these findings as well as implications for future research are critically discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Family Violence)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Mothers and Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: A Review of Treatment Interventions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1955; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091955
Received: 4 June 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
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Abstract
Although a growing field, much is still unknown about how different clinical and social care services might improve outcomes for female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) and their children who are indirectly exposed to it. This review sought to characterize the structure
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Although a growing field, much is still unknown about how different clinical and social care services might improve outcomes for female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) and their children who are indirectly exposed to it. This review sought to characterize the structure of programs that have been tested and documented in existing literature, and the mechanisms by which change, if any, may occur. Seventeen individual interventions and two follow-ups (n = 19) were included in the review. Findings suggest that a multileveled program of mothers and children working both separately and jointly together across sessions might generate the most successful psychosocial recovery for mothers and children who have experienced violence in the home. The mechanism by which this happens is likely a collaborative one, focused on enhancing the dyadic interaction. This article adds to the growing evidence base on IPV and confirms the positive impact on well-being that programs for IPV victims can have. The evidence-base overall could benefit from testing and replicating a combination of the results found in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Family Violence)
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