Special Issue "Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mary Barton
Division of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia
Website: http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/Staff/Homepage.asp?Name=Mary.Barton
E-Mail: mary.barton@unisa.edu.au
Interests: antibiotic resistance; human foodborne disease; zoonotic disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

World Health Day 2011 highlighted antimicrobial resistance as an issue – “antimicrobial resistance: no action today, no cure tomorrow”.  With some bacterial infections we are almost back to the pre-antibiotic era because of lack of therapeutic options due to antimicrobial resistance.  Currently there is particular concern about multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria such as NDM-metallo-beta lactamase producing organisms and carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.and there are many other highly resistant organisms, both Gram-negative and Gram-positive as well. MRSA has moved from being a health facility infection to a community infection, pan-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis is now a reality. Few new classes of antimicrobials are in the pipe line so what do we need to do to ensure that we will have effective therapies for bacterial infections into the future?  How can we prevent the emergence of new antimicrobial resistance problems and control the ones we already have? This special issue has a focus on antimicrobial resistance, not just the current and ballooning problem but what we can do to rectify the situation.  Papers addressing any issues relevant to antimicrobial resistance are invited and especially those addressing strategies to improve control of use of antimicrobials or prevent and control emergence of resistance.

Prof. Dr. Mary Barton
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • prevention
  • control
  • surveillance
  • monitoring
  • resistance genes

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Displaying article 1-8
p. 6235-6254
by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6235-6254; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126235
Received: 15 September 2013; in revised form: 4 November 2013 / Accepted: 7 November 2013 / Published: 25 November 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
p. 4274-4305
by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(9), 4274-4305; doi:10.3390/ijerph10094274
Received: 5 August 2013; in revised form: 2 September 2013 / Accepted: 3 September 2013 / Published: 12 September 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (723 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
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p. 4245-4260
by  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(9), 4245-4260; doi:10.3390/ijerph10094245
Received: 1 August 2013; in revised form: 29 August 2013 / Accepted: 3 September 2013 / Published: 11 September 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
p. 3453-3464
by  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3453-3464; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083453
Received: 17 May 2013; in revised form: 2 July 2013 / Accepted: 29 July 2013 / Published: 7 August 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
p. 3347-3362
by , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3347-3362; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083347
Received: 13 May 2013; in revised form: 11 July 2013 / Accepted: 29 July 2013 / Published: 6 August 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
p. 2857-2870
by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2857-2870; doi:10.3390/ijerph10072857
Received: 27 May 2013; in revised form: 1 July 2013 / Accepted: 3 July 2013 / Published: 9 July 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
p. 2643-2669
by , , , , , , , , , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2643-2669; doi:10.3390/ijerph10072643
Received: 24 April 2013; in revised form: 14 June 2013 / Accepted: 17 June 2013 / Published: 28 June 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
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p. 808-815
by , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(3), 808-815; doi:10.3390/ijerph10030808
Received: 28 December 2012; in revised form: 18 January 2013 / Accepted: 16 February 2013 / Published: 26 February 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Resistance Prevention and Control)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Escherichia Coli in Europe: Epidemiology, Multidrug-resistance Distribution and Prevention.
Author:
Nerino Allocati
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Sperimentali e Cliniche, Università 'G., d'Annunzio', Via dei Vestini 31, I-66013 Chieti, Italy; E-mail: allocati@unich.it
Abstract:
Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of urinary tract infection, enteritis, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis and sepsis. E. coli is also prominent associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. Multi-resistant E.coli strains are increasing worldwide principally caused by spread of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids.The increase of multidrug-resistance strains of E. coli occurs also Europe wide. Therefore, the spread of resistance in E. coli still remains a public health concern in European Union. This paper describes the behaviour of E.coli strains resistant to antibiotics that cause infections in Europe, emphasizing studies of molecular epidemiology. Furthermore, interventions for therapy and antibiotic strategies to prevent and control infections are presented and discussed. The article also provides an overview of the current knowledge concerning prospective treatment of E. coli diseases.

Last update: 14 January 2013

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert