Special Issue "Telemedicine, Telehealth and e-Health: New Frontiers in Medical Practice"

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A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ronald S. Weinstein

Department of Pathology, Arizona Health Sciences Center, The University of Arizona, 1501 N. Campbell Avenue, Room 1156, PO Box 245105, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: telemedicine; telepathology; medical education; cancer research; genitourinary pathology; diagnostic accuracy; medical errors; health literacy
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Elizabeth A. Krupinski

Department of Medical Imaging, Arizona Health Sciences Center, The University of Arizona, 1609 N. Warren Bldg 211, Rm 112, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: telemedicine; teleradiology; medical image perception; medical decision making; human factors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Healthcare will feature invited papers, by experts, on important topics in the fields of telemedicine, telehealth and mHealth (i.e., mobile Health). After a gestation period of a half a century, since the first multi-specialty telemedicine service was created in Boston at the Massachusetts General Hospital in the late 1960s, telemedicine is now reaching its stride as an important and practical way to deliver a broad spectrum of healthcare services to patients. Over 60 subspecialties of medicine and nursing are involved with telemedicine and telehealth. For example, teleradiology has become a standard-of-care for night time coverage in rural and urban hospitals. Telestroke networks may become the next essential “urgent care” service. Telepsychiatry is commonplace in many practice environments. The “smart phone” is being shown to be well suited for use in many mobile telehealth applications. Today, thousands of healthcare apps are being developed, tested and marketed to healthcare providers as well as patients. This special issue of Healthcare will feature original papers by leaders in telemedicine whose work is at the leading edge of this rapidly advancing field.

Prof. Dr. Ronald S. Weinstein
Prof. Dr. Elizabeth A. Krupinski
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • telemedicine
  • telehealth
  • mHealth
  • e-Health
  • telepathology
  • teleradiology
  • telestroke
  • telepsychiatry
  • treatment
  • quality of care
  • robotic surgery
  • home-health monitoring
  • telecommunications

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Telemedicine, Telehealth and m-Health: New Frontiers in Medical Practice
Healthcare 2014, 2(2), 250-252; doi:10.3390/healthcare2020250
Received: 24 April 2014 / Revised: 6 June 2014 / Accepted: 6 June 2014 / Published: 13 June 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (53 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Telemedicine is changing the practice of medicine. It is part of the ever-growing use of communications technology in health care being used in prevention, disease management, home health care, long-term (chronic) care, emergency medicine, remote medical imaging, and many other applications. The pace
[...] Read more.
Telemedicine is changing the practice of medicine. It is part of the ever-growing use of communications technology in health care being used in prevention, disease management, home health care, long-term (chronic) care, emergency medicine, remote medical imaging, and many other applications. The pace at which telemedicine is being adopted and integrated into the healthcare enterprise is exponential and, for many (even those in the field!), it is often difficult to keep up with all of the changes occurring. Thus, it is useful periodically to stand back and summarize recent advances, to take stock, analyze where we have been, and project where we are headed. [...] Full article

Review

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessReview Mobile Tele-Mental Health: Increasing Applications and a Move to Hybrid Models of Care
Healthcare 2014, 2(2), 220-233; doi:10.3390/healthcare2020220
Received: 7 February 2014 / Revised: 22 March 2014 / Accepted: 17 April 2014 / Published: 6 May 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (107 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mobile telemental health is defined as the use of mobile phones and other wireless devices as applied to psychiatric and mental health practice. Applications of such include treatment monitoring and adherence, health promotion, ecological momentary assessment, and decision support systems. Advantages of mobile
[...] Read more.
Mobile telemental health is defined as the use of mobile phones and other wireless devices as applied to psychiatric and mental health practice. Applications of such include treatment monitoring and adherence, health promotion, ecological momentary assessment, and decision support systems. Advantages of mobile telemental health are underscored by its interactivity, just-in-time interventions, and low resource requirements and portability. Challenges in realizing this potential of mobile telemental health include the low penetration rates of health applications on mobile devices in part due to health literacy, the delay in current published research in evaluating newer technologies, and outdated research methodologies. Despite such challenges, one immediate opportunity for mobile telemental health is utilizing mobile devices as videoconferencing mediums for psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions enhanced by novel sensor based monitoring and behavior-prediction algorithms. This paper provides an overview of mobile telemental health and its current trends, as well as future opportunities as applied to patient care in both academic research and commercial ventures. Full article
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Open AccessReview University-Based Teleradiology in the United States
Healthcare 2014, 2(2), 192-206; doi:10.3390/healthcare2020192
Received: 18 November 2013 / Revised: 21 March 2014 / Accepted: 24 March 2014 / Published: 15 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (108 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article reviews the University of Arizona’s more than 15 years of experience with teleradiology and provides an overview of university-based teleradiology practice in the United States (U.S.). In the U.S., teleradiology is a major economic enterprise with many private for-profit companies offering
[...] Read more.
This article reviews the University of Arizona’s more than 15 years of experience with teleradiology and provides an overview of university-based teleradiology practice in the United States (U.S.). In the U.S., teleradiology is a major economic enterprise with many private for-profit companies offering national teleradiology services (i.e., professional interpretation of radiologic studies of all types by American Board of Radiology certified radiologists). The initial thrust for teleradiology was for after-hours coverage of radiologic studies, but teleradiology has expanded its venue to include routine full-time or partial coverage for small hospitals, clinics, specialty medical practices, and urgent care centers. It also provides subspecialty radiologic coverage not available at smaller medical centers and clinics. Many U.S. university-based academic departments of radiology provide teleradiology services usually as an additional for-profit business to supplement departmental income. Since academic-based teleradiology providers have to compete in a very demanding marketplace, their success is not guaranteed. They must provide timely, high-quality professional services for a competitive price. Academic practices have the advantage of house officers and fellows who can help with the coverage, and they have excellent subspecialty expertise. The marketplace is constantly shifting, and university-based teleradiology practices have to be nimble and adjust to ever-changing situations. Full article
Open AccessReview Telemedicine Workplace Environments: Designing for Success
Healthcare 2014, 2(1), 115-122; doi:10.3390/healthcare2010115
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 13 February 2014 / Accepted: 17 February 2014 / Published: 24 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (85 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
When designing a facility for telemedicine, there are several things to consider from a human factors point of view, as well as from a practicality point of view. Although the future practice of telemedicine is likely to be more of a mobile-based practice
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When designing a facility for telemedicine, there are several things to consider from a human factors point of view, as well as from a practicality point of view. Although the future practice of telemedicine is likely to be more of a mobile-based practice and centered more in the home than it is now, it is still very important to consider ways to optimize the design of clinic-based telemedicine facilities. This is true on both ends of a consultation—where the patient is and where the consultant is. On the patient side, the first thing to realize is that most telemedicine clinics are not going to be newly designed and built. In all likelihood they will be existing rooms converted to telemedicine clinic rooms. Quite often the former room will not even have been used for clinical purposes, but may have simply been a storage area cleared out for telemedicine use. Therefore, design is often a challenge but there are a few basic principles that can be followed to create a workable clinical space. This paper will review some of the basic human factors principles to take into account when designing a working telemedicine environment. Full article
Open AccessReview Human Factors and Human-Computer Considerations in Teleradiology and Telepathology
Healthcare 2014, 2(1), 94-114; doi:10.3390/healthcare2010094
Received: 6 January 2014 / Revised: 31 January 2014 / Accepted: 7 February 2014 / Published: 19 February 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (287 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Radiology and pathology are unique among other clinical specialties that incorporate telemedicine technologies into clinical practice, as, for the most part in traditional practice, there are few or no direct patient encounters. The majority of teleradiology and telepathology involves viewing images, which is
[...] Read more.
Radiology and pathology are unique among other clinical specialties that incorporate telemedicine technologies into clinical practice, as, for the most part in traditional practice, there are few or no direct patient encounters. The majority of teleradiology and telepathology involves viewing images, which is exactly what occurs without the “tele” component. The images used are generally quite large, require dedicated displays and software for viewing, and present challenges to the clinician who must navigate through the presented data to render a diagnostic decision or interpretation. This digital viewing environment is very different from the more traditional reading environment (i.e., film and microscopy), necessitating a new look at how to optimize reading environments and address human factors issues. This paper will review some of the key components that need to be optimized for effective and efficient practice of teleradiology and telepathology using traditional workstations as well as some of the newer mobile viewing applications. Full article
Open AccessReview Standards and Guidelines in Telemedicine and Telehealth
Healthcare 2014, 2(1), 74-93; doi:10.3390/healthcare2010074
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 14 January 2014 / Accepted: 7 February 2014 / Published: 12 February 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (261 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development of guidelines and standards for telemedicine is an important and valuable process to help insure effective and safe delivery of quality healthcare. Some organizations, such as the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), have made the development of standards and guidelines a priority.
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The development of guidelines and standards for telemedicine is an important and valuable process to help insure effective and safe delivery of quality healthcare. Some organizations, such as the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), have made the development of standards and guidelines a priority. The practice guidelines developed so far have been well received by the telemedicine community and are being adopted in numerous practices, as well as being used in research to support the practice and growth of telemedicine. Studies that utilize published guidelines not only help bring them into greater public awareness, but they also provide evidence needed to validate existing guidelines and guide the revision of future versions. Telemedicine will continue to grow and be adopted by more healthcare practitioners and patients in a wide variety of forms not just in the traditional clinical environments, and practice guidelines will be a key factor in fostering this growth. Creation of guidelines is important to payers and regulators as well as increasingly they are adopting and integrating them into regulations and policies. This paper will review some of the recent ATA efforts in developing telemedicine practice guidelines, review the role of research in guidelines development, review data regarding their use, and discuss some of areas where guidelines are still needed. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


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